Tipp: So erkennen Sie gefärbte schwarze Oliven

Eisensalze statt Sonnenreife

Schwarze Oliven gelten als reif, aromatisch und mild. Aber Vorsicht: In den meisten Fällen ist die Farbe künstlich. Hier erfahren Sie, wie Sie zuverlässig eingefärbte schwarze Oliven erkennen.

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Schwarze Oliven gelten als kulinarische Verkörperung der typischen, mediterranen Ruhe. Denn Oliven bekommen die dunkle Farbe nur, wenn Sie in den warmen Sonnenstrahlen langsam reifen. Erst sind die Steinfrüchte grün, später violett und schließlich, wenn sie vollkommen sonnenverwöhnt sind, schwarz. Denn tatsächlich ist die Farbe der Oliven nur der Indikator des Reifegrades, die Sorte der Pflanze spielt hierbei keine Rolle. Jede schwarze Olive war einst grün – und mit genügend Zeit verdunkelt sich auch jede grüne Olive am Baum. Ein langsames, unhektisches und entspanntes Reifen, das Sie schmecken: Sind die grünen Oliven noch intensiv, leicht bitter und manchmal etwas scharf, schmecken ihre dunkleren Pendants deutlich milder und komplexer. Gleichzeitig haben schwarze Oliven eine zartere Konsistenz. Kein Wunder also, dass schwarze Oliven als qualitativ hochwertiger gelten.

(Source: http://www.ekitchen.de)

Lesvos to Present the Best of Greek Food

In Agia Paraskevi, the local Museum of Industrial Olive Oil Production will be hosting the olive oil cooking event, combining tradition and modern cooking trends. Olive oil, whole olives and olive paste will have a central role in the recipes, while the dishes will be presented in traditional clay utensils. The event will be accompanied by speeches regarding the pottery art of Lesvos.

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(Source: http://greece.greekreporter.com)

Deviled Eggs with Olives and Rosemary

Upgrade classic deviled eggs with olives, which also give the dish a health boost: they’re loaded with vitamin E  and you get a lot of good, healthy fats and great flavor. 

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Ingredients

12 large eggs | 3 tablespoons crème fraîche, plus more if needed | 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard | 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper | 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil | Juice of 1⁄2 lemon | 1/4 cup fresh rosemary leaves | Coarse sea salt to taste | Chopped Halkidiki olives (pitted) to taste | Paprika to taste

Preparation

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water.
2. Add the eggs and cook for 8 minutes. Drain the eggs and transfer to the ice water. When cool, peel and cut each egg in half lengthwise. Transfer the yolks to the bowl of a food processor; refrigerate the whites.
3. Add the crème fraîche, mustard, cayenne, olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary, and a pinch of salt to the food processor. Process until smooth, scraping the bowl occasionally. The mixture should be soft enough to pipe through a piping bag, but not too loose. If it’s stiff, pulse in another tablespoon of crème fraîche.
4. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag or resealable plastic bag with a hole snipped in one corner.
5. Arrange the egg whites cut-side up in a single layer on a serving platter. Pipe the yolk mixture into the egg white cavities.
6. Top each with chopped Halkidiki olives.
7. Sprinkle with paprika and serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Baked Cod with Crushed Tomatoes and Green Olives

by Nadine Levy Redzepi

baked-cod-crushed-tomatoes_Ditte-Isager_LEDEIngredients

  • Cod, haddock, or scrod fillets – 4 (about 7 ounces/200 g each)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil – 5 tablespoons (75 ml)
  • Plum (Roma) tomatoes – 4
  • Green olives such as Castelventrano – 10
  • Fresh oregano sprigs – 5
  • Fine sea salt
  • Crusty bread such as ciabatta – 2 slices
  • Garlic cloves – 2

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).

2. Pat the fish dry with paper towels. Slice off the thin side flap from each fillet, saving for another use. Coat the bottom of a baking dish large enough to hold the fish in a single layer with 2 tablespoons of the oil. Place the cod in the dish. Drizzle with another 2 tablespoons of the oil.

  • You want only the thick center portion of each fillet so the fish cooks evenly and doesn’t overcook.

3. To core the tomatoes easily, slice each one downward next to but not through the stem. Make two angled cuts into the larger half to release the core and discard.

4. Squeeze each tomato half over the fish, letting the juice and seeds fall mainly on the fish. Arrange the tomatoes around the fish. Smash each of the green olives under the flat side of your knife and discard the pit. Scatter the olives over the tomatoes. Chop the oregano leaves, discarding the stems, and sprinkle over the fish and vegetables. Season very lightly with salt.

  • You can choose from more delicious olive varieties if you are willing to take the pits out yourself.
  • This technique is so easy and much quicker than using an olive pitter!

5. Tear the bread into small pieces and process into coarse crumbs in a food processor. Pour the crumbs into a medium bowl. Crush the garlic cloves with the flat side of your knife and discard the papery skins. With the machine running, drop the garlic through the feed tube of the processor to mince it. Return half of the crumbs to the processor with the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil and pulse to moisten. Add the remaining bread crumbs and pulse to combine everything. Use a spoon to sprinkle the garlic bread crumbs evenly over the fish and tomatoes.

6. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the fish flakes easily when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes. Serve hot, right from the dish.

(Source: https://www.splendidtable.org)

Greek Feta & Olive Spread

This appetizer includes all the classic Greek ingredients, and comes together quickly.

SpicyFetaDipBoardCloseINGREDIENTS

  • 1 package (6 ounce) feta cheese, crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 2 ounces sun-dried tomatoes, softened
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon black olives, drained and chopped
  • In a food processor, place the feta cheese, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, sun-dried tomatoes and oregano. Using the pulse setting, blend the mixture until smooth. Transfer to a medium bowl.
  • Blend in the olives by hand or with a spoon.
  • Refrigerate until serving.

(Source: https://www.epicurious.com)

RECIPE: Do-it-yourself olives

by THE WEEKEND COOK with Maggie Cooper

OLIVES are very much an acquired taste, one that, thankfully, I learned to enjoy quite a few years ago. We grow terrific olives here in Australia. Our country has so many different climates in so many areas that there are few crops we cannot manage here once good farming practices are applied.
I often wonder how we first discovered olives were edible; the raw fruit is not thanks to a bitter compound called oleuropein. Depending on the age and variety of the fruit it can be leached out by splitting the olives and soaking them in water – changed daily – for a length of time (up to a month). Other varieties need to be cured by one of several methods using salt, brine or lye. So it’s quite a process to convert them to the tasty nibble we enjoy with drinks, on pizzas or as an addition to many Mediterranean recipes. I like to buy a good brand of Aussie olive and then marinate them myself. They are delicious served warmed with pre-dinner drinks. Just about any of your favourite herbs and spices can be used. My personal choices are thyme, rosemary, garlic, nigella (black cumin) seeds and a little dried chilli. Feel free to experiment: oregano, sage, marjoram, regular cumin seeds, mustard seeds, mandarin peel, and peppercorns are alternatives.

doityourself
Warm herbed olives
Serves 4

INGREDIENTS: 2 cups cured mixed olives
1/4 cup cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
zest of a small lemon
2 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
3 tsp fresh thyme leaves
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
1 tsp fennel or nigella (black cumin) seeds (optional)
1 tsp dried chilli flakes (optional)

METHOD: Drain brine from olives and discard.
In a small saucepan, combine oil, lemon zest, garlic and herbs, reserving one sprig of rosemary for garnish.
Add fennel or nigella seeds and chilli flakes if using.
Heat oil over a medium heat until garlic just starts to colour; don’t allow it to brown as it will become bitter.
Remove from heat and stir in the olives.
Cover and allow to sit for at least 15 minutes, preferably overnight.
Reheat gently before serving.
Contact Maggie at maggies.column@bigpond.com

(Source: https://www.chinchillanews.com.au)

Summer bath

Marinated Olives

Marinated Olives

INGREDIENTS
1.5 – 2 c olives of choice, something like Kalamata, Nicoise, Liguria, Amfissa (see here)
1 tbsp sweet pepper flakes
2 tsp dry thyme (if fresh use less)
1.5 tsp dry oregano (if fresh use less)
2 – 3 garlic cloves, smashed with the side of your knife
olive oil, enough to mostly cover the olives

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large bowl combine all the ingredients and let sit at room temperature for at least 45 minutes before serving.

(Source: https://recordsintheden.com)

OLIVE YOU

European Table Olives: Showcasing Superior Quality And Taste

olive youThe Panhellenic Association of Table Olives Processors, Packers and Exporters (PEMETE) has presented its ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign in the USA.

The campaign is a three-year promotional programme co-funded by the European Union, which aims to increase the awareness and demand for European table olives of both professionals and consumers as well as to develop exports in the target markets of USA and Canada.

The ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign was launched at the Summer Fancy Food Show, the largest food and beverage trade show in North America, held this year in New York on June 25-27, with more than 40,500 registered participants.

Under the umbrella of the Olive You campaign, PEMETE and seven of its member companies participated in this important international food show, highlighting the superior quality and high standards of European table olives.

Campaign Launch

Over 2,000 distributors and HoReCa sectors visited the ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ booths and were presented with European Table Olives varieties and informed about their superior quality and flavours. They also had the opportunity to taste this healthy product.

olive-you-european-table-olives-showcasing-superior-quality-and-tasteIn addition, 200 participants completed campaign questionnaires aiming to provide insights about the American consumers current perception about this food product.

Following the event, the three-year ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign in the US and Canada will approach journalists, chefs, foodies, retailers and consumers of all ages, through promotional activities, events, sampling, and publicity, in order to familiarise the public with this natural and delicious food product.

PEMETE is a professional association, founded in 1970, that promotes the interests of table olive exporters. The 46 member-companies of PEMETE represent more than 90% of Greece’s exports of table olives to more than 100 countries.

(Source: https://www.esmmagazine.com)

“Have an Olive Day” Launches with EU Support

Have an Olive day

The European Union has teamed up with Spanish Inter-Professional Table Olive Organization, INTERACEITUNA, and Michelin-starred chef José Andrés to launch an olives campaign directed at U.S. consumers. The goal of the campaign—“A tasty message from Europe. Have an Olive Day”—is to raise awareness of the versatility, flavor, nutrition, and rich history of olive production in Europe, especially in Spain, the world leader in production and exports of table olives.

The campaign will run through 2019 and will seek to educate U.S. consumers on the different variations of European olives and their culinary uses. It will focus on U.S. regions with high olive consumption, including New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia.

(Source: https://www.specialtyfood.com)

US-Handelsministerium nimmt sich spanische Oliven vor

Zwei US-Produzenten behaupten in einer Klage, dass spanische Oliven um bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden. Das US-Handelsministerium will den “unfairen Handel” stoppen.

oliven_1500025337079693Nach Holz aus Kanada und Zucker aus Mexiko nimmt die US-Regierung jetzt spanische Oliven ins Visier. Das Handelsministerium in Washington teilte am Donnerstag mit, es habe eine Untersuchung gestartet, ob Olivenimporte aus Spanien “unfair subventioniert” sind. Das Ministerium gehe damit einer Klage von zwei US-Olivenproduzenten nach.

Sie behaupten, dass spanische Oliven in den USA bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden.

Handelsminister Wilbur Ross erklärte, die Regierung werde “rasch handeln, um jeglichen unfairen Handel zu stoppen”. Bis zum 7. August will das Ministerium entscheiden, ob Unternehmen und Beschäftigte in den USA tatsächlich geschädigt werden. Ab September könnte die Regierung vorläufige Strafzölle gegen spanische Oliven verhängen, im November dann endgültige.

Oliven-Exporte in Höhe von 71 Millionen Dollar

Spanien exportierte im vergangenen Jahr Oliven im Wert von knapp 71 Millionen Dollar (62 Mio. Euro) in die USA, wie das Ministerium mitteilte. Es handelte sich um “alle Farben, alle Formen, alle Größen” von reifen, verpackten Oliven. “Spezial-Oliven” etwa für den Martini gehören nicht dazu, auch mit Knoblauch oder Käse gefüllte Oliven nicht.

Die USA streiten sich bereits mit Kanada um den Import von Nadelbaumhölzern und den Export von US-Milchprodukten dorthin. Der Zuckerstreit mit Mexiko ist mittlerweile beigelegt – der Preis für Zucker aus Mexiko, der in die USA geliefert wird, wurde leicht angehoben.

US-Präsident Donald Trump hat auch in der Handelspolitik die Parole “Amerika zuerst” ausgegeben. Die Regierung will mehrere Freihandelsabkommen neu verhandeln. Multilaterale Abkommen mit vielen Mitgliedsländern sieht sie kritisch.

(Source: http://diepresse.com)