Chilli Salmon Delight

str2_amy0210_jg_2-770x4702 servings

2x160g salmon fillet; salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste; a dash of cayenne pepper; olive oil for drizzling; 2 cloves garlic, crushed; some shredded purple cabbage; 1 mini yellow capsicum, halved and sliced; fresh salad leaves like curly endives, etc.

Balsamic dressing
3 tbsp balsamic vinegar; 1 tbsp honey; salt to taste; 1 tbsp olive oil; 1 tsp capers, chopped; 3 green olives, sliced

For the dressing

In a small mixing bowl, combine the balsamic vinegar, honey and salt. Stir to dissolve the salt before drizzling in the olive oil; whisk with a fork or small wire whisk until emulsified. Toss in the capers and green olives. Set aside.

To cook

Preheat a grill pan over medium high heat. Sprinkle salmon with salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and cook for 2-3 minutes each side, or until cooked to your liking. Remove from grill. Add the garlic cloves and grill according to your taste. Remove garlic.

To assemble

Divide the cabbage, capsicum and salad leaves between two serving plates. Place a slice of salmon and a garlic clove on each plate and drizzle the balsamic dressing over the salad. Serve.


Pitting yourself against olive etiquette? Here is the CORRECT way to eat olives with pits

IS THERE a polite way of eating pitted olives without spitting the remains into your hand?



While olive connoisseurs reckon olives with a pit inside are tastier than those without, eating them can prove particularly difficult – especially in front of a crowd.
Most people simply pick the pit out from between their teeth or spit it into their hand, which doesn’t seem too polite. But is this the only way to dispose of it? Or is their a much more glamorous way? Website Olive Central reveals how one should dispose of the pit correctly when eating olives.
Olive Central says there are two scenarios you’ll find yourselves with olives – the first is when they’re served as snacks. The site adds: “To pick them up, use a toothpick if they have been made available, otherwise fingers is fine. Small olives of into your mouth whole, while big olives can be held not he ends with your thumb and forefinger and the flesh bitten off the olive.
“If biting the flesh off the olive, the pit remaining between the two fingers can simply be discarded. When eating the olive whole the pit can be gently spat into your palm or the end of your upright fist.”
Olive-635654“For a slightly more sophisticated version, hold you other handing front of your mouth to hid this spitting activity from view.”
And where should you discard of the pit?
If a bowl has been provided for the pits, they can be put in there, but if not, the side of your own plate is deemed acceptable.Alternatively they can be stored in a paper napkin for later disposal.
The second scenario is when olives form part of a salad. In this scenario, according to Olive Central, table etiquette applies. This means the olive should be put in your mouth using a fork.
The site says: “The easiest way to pick it up is to hold the olive down with your knife and then stab it with your fork. Place the olive in your mouth.
“Tables etiquette suggests that anything thatches out of your mouth should do so the same way it went in. In this case the fork should be used to discard the pit.
“Place one hand in front of your mouth to hide this activity and gently push the pit onto the fork using your tongue.”
But if this forms too much of a challenge for you, you can revert to spitting the pit onto your hand and discarding it.
Again, the other hand should be places in front of your mouth for that added level of sophistication.


Olives and Bone: A Green Osteoporosis Prevention Option

ijerph-logoKok-Yong Chin*  and Soelaiman Ima-Nirwana

Department of Pharmacology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, 56000 Cheras, Malaysia


Skeletal degeneration due to aging, also known as osteoporosis, is a major health problem worldwide. Certain dietary components confer protection to our skeletal system against osteoporosis. Consumption of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols has been shown to improve bone health. This review aims to summarize the current evidence from cellular, animal and human studies on the skeletal protective effects of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols. Animal studies showed that supplementation of olives, olive oil or olive polyphenols could improve skeletal health assessed via bone mineral density, bone biomechanical strength and bone turnover markers in ovariectomized rats, especially those with inflammation. The beneficial effects of olive oil and olive polyphenols could be attributed to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. However, variations in the bone protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects between studies were noted. Cellular studies demonstrated that olive polyphenols enhanced proliferation of pre-osteoblasts, differentiation of osteoblasts and decreased the formation of osteoclast-like cells. However, the exact molecular pathways for its bone health promoting effects are yet to be clearly elucidated. Human studies revealed that daily consumption of olive oil could prevent the decline in bone mineral density and improve bone turnover markers. As a conclusion, olives, olive oil and its polyphenols are potential dietary interventions to prevent osteoporosis among the elderly.

(Download full article: pdf)


Gin Mare Cured Sea Bass with Pickled Cucumber, Black Olives, Chilli & a Scallop Beignet in Tonic Bat

Gin Mare Cured Sea Bass with Pickled Cucumber, Black Olives, Chilli & a Scallop Beignet in Tonic Batter


  • 1 large sea bass fillet, scaled and pinned
  • 80g sea salt
  • 25g caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 lemon zest of
  • 1 orange zest of
  • ¼ bunch mint, chiffonade
  • 70ml gin mare
  1. Mix together the sugar, salt, lemon zest, orange zest, peppercorns and mint then mix in the gin, completely cover all sides of the sea bass with the cure.
  2. Place the fillet in a tray or plate with the cure with another plate on top to press slightly and place in the fridge.
  3. Leave to cure for 24 hours in the fridge. Wash off well under cold running water and pat dry.

For The Dressing:

  • 100ml of the marinade (passed)
  • 1 orange juice of
  • 2 lemon juice of
  • 250ml virgin rapeseed oil
  1. Mix all ingredients together.

To Garnish:

  • 6 medium scallops, cleaned
  • 75g plain flour
  • 50g corn flour
  • 125ml tonic
  • 1 red chilli, de-seeded and sliced fine
  • 10g coriander cress
  • 6 black olives, sliced
  • ¼ cucumber sliced
  • 40g sea salt
  • 100ml white wine vinegar
  • 50g sugar
  • 1tsp mustard seeds
  1. First mix the sliced cucumber with the sea salt and leave for 20 minutes, in the meantime bring to the boil the vinegar, sugar and mustard seeds until the sugar has dissolved, allow to cool.
  2. Wash off the cucumber under plenty of cold running water and pat dry on a clean towel, place in a bowl and pour over the boiled vinegar sugar mixture and put to one side.
  3. Next make the tempura batter, in a bowl mix the plain flour, corn flour, baking powder and tonic together to achieve a very light batter.

To serve:

  1. Slice the sea bass thinly leaving the skin behind, lay out on a cold plate and smother with the dressing.
  2. Place the scallops in the batter and then deep-fry @190c for 1-2 minutes, remove and drain on kitchen paper then place on top of the sliced sea bass plates.
  3. Finish by sprinkling over the pickled cucumber, chilli, olives and coriander cress and serve immediately.

Cooking with Gin Mare at Rocksalt Folkestone Recipes by Mark Sergeant


Lemon and Herb Olives

These are great make ahead appetizers; delicious at room temperature or slightly warm

Greek Volunteers Harvest Olives for Fellow Residents in Need

As olives were harvested this fall to be prepped for the massive olive oil production that takes place throughout Greece, a special harvest took place in the municipality of Glyfada involving a humanitarian effort by the city and volunteers to provide olive oil to people in need.

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.


Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.


O πρώτος διεθνής διαγωνισμός ελαιόλαδου στη χώρα μας είναι γεγονός!

της Κικής Τριανταφύλλη

Την πρωτοβουλία διοργάνωσης του Πρώτου Διεθνούς Διαγωνισμού Ελαιολάδου Αθηνών, «Athena International Olive Oil Competition», που θα διεξαχθεί στις 21 και 22 Μαρτίου 2016 στο ξενοδοχείο  Electra  Palace στην Πλάκα, έχει αναλάβει η Vinetum Event Management, εταιρεία επικοινωνίας με μεγάλη πείρα στην οργάνωση εκθέσεων, συνεδρίων, διαγωνισμών και άλλων εκδηλώσεων υψηλού κύρους και απαιτήσεων.


Δυο επαγγελματίες που διατηρούν στενή σχέση με το κρασί αλλά και με το ελαιόλαδο είναι οι εμπνευστές που ανέλαβαν, σε περίοδο κρίσης, το ρίσκο της διοργάνωσης. Πρόεδρος του διαγωνισμού είναι ο Ντίνος Στεργίδης, ιδιοκτήτης και Διευθύνων Σύμβουλος της Vinetum, και Διευθύντρια η Μαρία Κατσούλη, 1η ελληνίδα οινοχόος, διαπιστευμένη γευσιγνώστρια ελαιολάδου και 1η οινοχόος ελαιολάδου της Ελλάδος, ενώ panel leader όλων των κριτών θα είναι η διεθνώς καταξιωμένη γευσιγνώστρια ελαιόλαδου Αλίκη Γαλή.

Ο διαγωνισμός «Athena International Olive Oil Competition» είναι διεθνής τόσο ως προς τους κριτές όσο και τη συμμετοχή δειγμάτων και αφορά μόνο τυποποιημένα ελαιόλαδα της κατηγορίας εξαιρετικά παρθένα (extra virgin). Οι ξένοι κριτές αποτελούν τα 2/3 του συνολικού αριθμού κριτών ενώ στόχος των οργανωτών είναι τα δείγματα ελαιολάδων από το εξωτερικό να υπερβαίνουν το 30% του συνολικού αριθμού δειγμάτων.Το πρώτο ξένο δείγμα ήρθε ήδη από την Πορτογαλία ενώ αναμένονται επίσης δείγματα από ελαιοπαραγωγούς χώρες όπως το Ισραήλ, η Ιταλία, η Ισπανία, η Κροατία, η Τουρκία, το Μαρόκο, η Τυνησία ακόμη και από το Περού.
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Black olive and lemon paté

A fabulous quartet of flavours – the richness of the cream cheese is cut through with the acidity of lemon and the earthy tang of olives.


Serves 4
100g olives, pitted
250g cream cheese
Juice of 1 lemon
Black pepper

1 Add the pitted olives to a blender and blend until almost smooth.

2 Transfer the olive mix to a fine sieve and sit it over a bowl to drain any excess liquid – around 5 minutes should do it. However, if your olives were in liquid it might take a little longer.

3 Next, add the cream cheese to a mixing bowl with the olives, lemon juice and black pepper. Carefully fold together until incorporated.

4 Place a round pastry cutter in the centre of a serving plate, add the paté and tamp down. Remove the ring and serve with some dressed leaves and hot toast.
Andrew Dargue,


Grilled Whole Mackerel With Lemon, Oregano, and Olives

Grilling a whole fish sounds daunting, but it’s incredibly simple and requires almost no preparation before cooking it.

This recipe is courtesy of Epicurious.

Grilled Mackerel Flickr MainDirections

Whisk together lemon zest, juice, salt, and pepper. Pour in the olive oil in a stream, whisking until combined well. Whisk in olives and chopped oregano.

With a sharp paring knife, make 1-inch long slits at 2-inch intervals down the middle of the fish, on both sides. Brush the fish all over with vegetable oil, and season with salt and pepper. Season fish cavity with salt and pepper, and fill the cavity with 3 lemon slices and 3 oregano sprigs. Arrange remaining lemon slices and oregano sprigs on top of fish and tie fish closed with kitchen string.

Preheat grill to medium-high heat for cooking. If using a charcoal grill, open the vents on the bottom of the grill before lighting the charcoal.

Grill fish on lightly oiled grill rack, covered only if using gas grill, for 15 minutes. Turn fish over using a metal spatula and tongs, and grill for 15 more minutes, until just cooked through.

Transfer fish to a large serving platter, remove kitchen string, and pour lemon-olive sauce over the top before serving.


Decoding the complete genome of the Mediterranean’s most emblematic tree: the olive

• A team of scientists from three Spanish centers has sequenced, for the first time ever, the complete genome of the olive tree.

• The results have been just published this week in the Open Access journal GigaScience. This work will facilitate genetic improvement for production of olives and olive oil, two key products in the Spanish economy and diet.

• The specimen sequenced is an olive tree of the Farga variety, one of the most widespread in eastern Spain, and over 1,300 years old.

dna1The olive was one of the first trees to be domesticated in the history of mankind, probably some 6,000 years ago. A Mediterranean emblem par excellence, it is of vital importance to the Spanish and other regional economies (Italy, Greece and Portugal). In fact, Spain is the leading producer of olive oil in the world. Every year, nearly three million tons of oil are produced, for local consumption and export. Spain produces one third of this total.

Nonetheless, up to now, the genome of the olive tree were unknown. The genome regulate such factors as the differences among varieties, sizes and flavor of the olives, why the trees live so long or the reasons for their adaptation to dryland farming.

Now a team of researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) of Barcelona, the Real Jardin Botánico (CSIC-RJB) and the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG), has brought new insight to the genetic puzzle of the olive tree, by sequencing the complete genome of this species for the first time ever. The results of this work, fully funded by Banco Santander, have been published this week in the groundbreaking Open Access and Open Data journal GigaScience. The article will pave the way to new research work that will help olive trees in their development and protecting them from infections now causing major damage, such as the attacks of bacteria (Xilella fastidiosa) and fungi (Verticillium dhailae).

“Without a doubt, it is an emblematic tree, and it is very difficult to improve plant breeding, as you have to wait at least 12 years to see what morphological characteristics it will have, and whether it is advisable to cross-breed,” says principal author of this paper Toni Gabaldón, ICREA research professor and head of the comparative genomics laboratory at the CRG. “Knowing the genetic information of the olive tree will let us contribute to the improvement of oil and olive production, of major relevance to the Spanish economy,” he adds.

Private funding to support public science

The story of this project begins with a presentation, a coincidence and a challenge. Four years ago, Gabaldón worked with Pablo Vargas, a CSIC researcher at the Real Jardín Botánico, on the presentation of scientific results of projects focused on endangered species, such as the Iberian lynx, that had been financed by Banco Santander.

At that time, Banco Santander had expressed great interest in financing scientific projects in Spain. Over the course of the presentation, Pablo Vargas proposed to Emilio Botín the complete sequencing of the olive tree genome, using the same technology as had been used to sequence the lynx; in other words, the most state-ofthe-art technological strategy to achieve a high-quality genome.

Five months after that meeting, a contract was signed to carry out the first complete sequencing of the olive tree’s DNA, a three-year research effort coordinated by Pablo Vargas.

“There are three phases to genome sequencing: first, isolate all of the genes, which we published two years ago. Second, assemble the genome, which is a matter of ordering those genes one after the other, like linking up loose phrases in a book. Last, identify all of the genes, or binding the book. The latter two phases are what we have done and are now presenting,” says the CSIC Real Jardín Botánico researcher.

To continue with the book analogy, according to Tyler Alioto of the CNAG-CRG “this genome has generated some 1.31 billion letters, and over 1,000 GBytes of data. We are surprised because we have detected over 56,000 genes, significantly more than those detected in sequenced genomes of related plants, and twice that of the human genome.”

Decoding its evolutionary history

In addition to the complete sequencing of the olive tree genome, researchers have also compared the DNA of this thousand-year-old tree with other varieties such as the wild olive. They have also found the transcriptome, the genes expressed to determine what differences exist on the genetic expression level in leaves, roots and fruits at different stages of ripening.

The next step, researchers say, will be to decode the evolutionary history of this tree, which has formed part of old-world civilizations since the Bronze Age. At that time, in the eastern Mediterranean, the process of domesticating wild olive trees that led to today’s trees began. Later, selection processes in different Mediterranean countries gave rise to the nearly 1,000 varieties of trees we have today.

Knowing the evolution of olive trees from different countries will make it possible to know their origins and discover the keys that have allowed it to adapt to very diverse environmental conditions. It will also help discover the reasons behind its extraordinary longevity, as the trees can live for 3,000 to 4,000 years.

“That longevity makes the olive tree we have sequenced practically a living monument,” says Gabaldón. “Up to now, all of the individuals sequenced, from the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) to the first human being analyzed, have lived for a certain time, depending on their life expectancy, but then died or will die. This is the first time that the DNA of an individual over 1,000 years old, and that will probably live another 1,300 years, has been sequenced.” say Gabaldón and Vargas.

Reference: Fernando Cruz, Irene Julca, Jèssica Gómez-Garrido, Damian Loska, Marina MarcetHouben, Emilio Cano, Beatriz Galán, Leonor Frias, Paolo Ribeca, Marta Gut, Manuel Sánchez-Fernández, Jose Luis García, Ivo G. Gut, Pablo Vargas, Tyler S. Alioto, and Toni Gabaldón. “Genome sequence of the olive tree, Olea europaea” GigaScience 2016. DOI: 10.1186/s13742-016-0134-5

Image available at:

For more information and interviews:

Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) Laia Cendrós, press officer Tel. +34 93 316 0237 – Mobile +34 607 611 798 –

Real Jardín Botánico – CSIC Jesús García, head communications officer Tel. +34 91 420 30 17 ext 188 –

Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) Anna Borrell, communication assistant Tel. + 34 93 402 0580 –





  • 10 oil-packed anchovy fillets, finely chopped
  • 1 cup Castelvetrano olives, pitted, crushed
  • 1 cup Cerignola olives, pitted, crushed
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped parsley
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped, drained capers
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated lemon zest
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper


  • Mix anchovies, both olives, parsley, oil, capers, lemon zest, and lemon juice in a large jar or medium bowl; season with salt and pepper.
  • Tapenade can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.


Frisch gebacken: mediterrane Burger mit Radieschen

Den Geschmack des Sommers beschwört Steirerschlössl-Küchenchef Johannes Marterer herauf – mit Oliven-Buns und einer köstlichen gesunden Füllung.

marterer_last_004_1462548622382619_v0_hFür den Teig:
650 g Weizenmehl, 50 g Roggenmehl, 7 g Salz, 30 g Maizena, 450 g zimmerwarmes Wasser, 20 g Germ, 200 g schwarze Oliven ohne Kern.

Für den Belag:
etwas Sauerrahm, Zucchini, Olivenöl und Knoblauch zum Anbraten, Paradeiser, Radieschen, Koriandergrün, Basilikum, Meersalz, Pfeffer.

1. Für den Teig die Oliven klein hacken. Weizenmehl, Maizena, Roggenmehl und Salz mischen. Germ in Wasser auflösen, mit den Oliven in das Mehl einarbeiten, zu einem Teig kneten. Mit einem Geschirrtuch abdecken, 20 Min. an einem warmen Ort gehen lassen.
2. Noch einmal durchkneten, Teig zu einer Rolle formen. Teigstücke von je 65 g abtrennen und zu Kugeln formen. Auf ein mit Backpapier ausgekleidetes Backblech legen – nicht zu eng, besser ein zweites Blech verwenden. Weitere 20 Min. zugedeckt gehen lassen.
3. Im vorgeheizten Herd bei 200 Grad etwa 20 Min. oder etwas länger – je nach Herd –backen.
4. Radieschen und Paradeiser in Scheiben schneiden. Kräuter grob hacken. Zucchini in Scheiben schneiden, mit ein paar ungeschälten Knoblauchzehen in wenig Olivenöl scharf anbraten.
5. Zusammenbauen: Weckerl in der Mitte auseinanderschneiden. Den Brotboden mit 1 TL Sauerrahm bestreichen. Mit Zucchini, Paradeisern, Radieschen, Kräutern belegen, mit Salz und Pfeffer würzen. Olivenweckerldeckel aufsetzen.


Educational Games for Olive and Olive Oil

“In the areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, people have not been living alone. For thousands of years, they have been living together with a different kind of population, a population that constantly grows and expands over the plains, the slopes and the mountains of the hinterland of the Mediterranean countries. This is the population of the olive trees,” as we learn from the back cover of a new book, On the Olive Routes by Nikos Michelakis, Angela Malmou, Anaya Sarpaki, and George Fragiadakis.

OliveGames and Routes

Above there is a series of educational games and digital books created under the Project of Raising Youth Awareness for Olive and Olive Oil from Association of Cretan Olive Municipalities in cooperation with the International Olive Council (