OLIVE YOU

European Table Olives: Showcasing Superior Quality And Taste

olive youThe Panhellenic Association of Table Olives Processors, Packers and Exporters (PEMETE) has presented its ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign in the USA.

The campaign is a three-year promotional programme co-funded by the European Union, which aims to increase the awareness and demand for European table olives of both professionals and consumers as well as to develop exports in the target markets of USA and Canada.

The ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign was launched at the Summer Fancy Food Show, the largest food and beverage trade show in North America, held this year in New York on June 25-27, with more than 40,500 registered participants.

Under the umbrella of the Olive You campaign, PEMETE and seven of its member companies participated in this important international food show, highlighting the superior quality and high standards of European table olives.

Campaign Launch

Over 2,000 distributors and HoReCa sectors visited the ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ booths and were presented with European Table Olives varieties and informed about their superior quality and flavours. They also had the opportunity to taste this healthy product.

olive-you-european-table-olives-showcasing-superior-quality-and-tasteIn addition, 200 participants completed campaign questionnaires aiming to provide insights about the American consumers current perception about this food product.

Following the event, the three-year ‘OLIVE YOU, European Table Olives’ campaign in the US and Canada will approach journalists, chefs, foodies, retailers and consumers of all ages, through promotional activities, events, sampling, and publicity, in order to familiarise the public with this natural and delicious food product.

PEMETE is a professional association, founded in 1970, that promotes the interests of table olive exporters. The 46 member-companies of PEMETE represent more than 90% of Greece’s exports of table olives to more than 100 countries.

(Source: https://www.esmmagazine.com)

US-Handelsministerium nimmt sich spanische Oliven vor

Zwei US-Produzenten behaupten in einer Klage, dass spanische Oliven um bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden. Das US-Handelsministerium will den “unfairen Handel” stoppen.

oliven_1500025337079693Nach Holz aus Kanada und Zucker aus Mexiko nimmt die US-Regierung jetzt spanische Oliven ins Visier. Das Handelsministerium in Washington teilte am Donnerstag mit, es habe eine Untersuchung gestartet, ob Olivenimporte aus Spanien “unfair subventioniert” sind. Das Ministerium gehe damit einer Klage von zwei US-Olivenproduzenten nach.

Sie behaupten, dass spanische Oliven in den USA bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden.

Handelsminister Wilbur Ross erklärte, die Regierung werde “rasch handeln, um jeglichen unfairen Handel zu stoppen”. Bis zum 7. August will das Ministerium entscheiden, ob Unternehmen und Beschäftigte in den USA tatsächlich geschädigt werden. Ab September könnte die Regierung vorläufige Strafzölle gegen spanische Oliven verhängen, im November dann endgültige.

Oliven-Exporte in Höhe von 71 Millionen Dollar

Spanien exportierte im vergangenen Jahr Oliven im Wert von knapp 71 Millionen Dollar (62 Mio. Euro) in die USA, wie das Ministerium mitteilte. Es handelte sich um “alle Farben, alle Formen, alle Größen” von reifen, verpackten Oliven. “Spezial-Oliven” etwa für den Martini gehören nicht dazu, auch mit Knoblauch oder Käse gefüllte Oliven nicht.

Die USA streiten sich bereits mit Kanada um den Import von Nadelbaumhölzern und den Export von US-Milchprodukten dorthin. Der Zuckerstreit mit Mexiko ist mittlerweile beigelegt – der Preis für Zucker aus Mexiko, der in die USA geliefert wird, wurde leicht angehoben.

US-Präsident Donald Trump hat auch in der Handelspolitik die Parole “Amerika zuerst” ausgegeben. Die Regierung will mehrere Freihandelsabkommen neu verhandeln. Multilaterale Abkommen mit vielen Mitgliedsländern sieht sie kritisch.

(Source: http://diepresse.com)

Are Spanish olive producers playing dirty on trade? Trump administration investigates

By Jackie Wattles
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — The Trump administration is taking its fight for American trade to the market for Spanish olives.

commodity trading 2The U.S. Department of Commerce said Thursday that it’s launching investigations into whether Spanish olive producers are violating fair trade laws. Investigators are concerned that the foreign producers are “dumping” olives into the U.S. — meaning Spanish olives are selling in the United States for less than they would sell for in Spain. That goes against laws that seek to protect American producers from being unfairly undercut by outside competition. It’s not a big market: About $70.9 million worth of Spanish olives were imported to the United States last year, according to the Commerce Department. Officials are working to determine whether olive dumping is taking place, and whether “olive producers in Spain are receiving alleged unfair subsidies,” the department said.
According to Commerce, the petitioner is the Coalition for Fair Trade in Ripe Olives, whose members are Bell-Carter Foods and Musco Family Olive Co. Bell-Carter CEO Tim Carter said in a June press release that “dumped and subsidized Spanish ripe olives are severely impacting” his business. He added that when the American olive industry was at its peak, there were 20 olive processors and 1,100 growers, but today there’s only two processors and 890 growers. Felix Musco, CEO of Musco Family Olive Co., has called the olive industry’s decline “painful.” “Our ripe olive industry takes great pride in the industry it created, the high quality of its product, and the thousands of workers and families the industry supports. Without import relief, all of this is at risk,” he said in a June statement. If wrongdoing is found, and if the International Trade Commission determines that U.S. producers were harmed, the Commerce Department promised it “will act swiftly to halt any unfair trade practices,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. Specifically, the U.S. government plans to impose taxes on Spanish olive imports “in the amount of dumping and/or unfair subsidization found to exist.” Bell-Carter and Musco have suggested those tariffs should be between 78% and a whopping 223%. The Commerce Department said it plans to have the first round of preliminary investigation results by later this year. commodity trading 1The move marks the 51st fair trade investigation that the administration has launched since President Trump took office in January, the Commerce Department said. One of those probes seeks to uncover illegal steel trading. Trump doubled down Thursday on his threats to slap a hefty tariff on steel, citing “dumping” concerns. As Trump steps up his tough actions to protect U.S. producers, some economists and business people are worried about possible retaliation from other countries. A report earlier this month by the Centre for Economic Policy Research, which is based in London, suggested that America’s biggest trade partners have taken far fewer protectionist measures against U.S. business so far this year.

–CNNMoney’s Ivana Kottasová and Patrick Gillespie contributed to this report

TM & © 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

(Source: http://www.wnem.com)

Olive production down 30%

Production of olives for olive oil in Portugal is expected to have fallen by 30 percent in 2016 to less than 500,000 tonnes, and the autumn/winter grain growing area to have fallen to an “all-time low” according to projections from the National Statistics Institute.

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According to INE, the drop in olive production for oil was the result of “adverse weather and the annual production rotation of traditional olive groves,” and expects total production of about 491,000 tonnes
(-30 percent against 2015), but “good quality” olive oil.
As for autumn/winter grains there was a “general reduction of installed areas,” compared to the previous year due to periods of intense cold and a lack of rain.
INE’s projections point to drops of around 5 percent in rye area, 10 percent in common wheat, triticale and barley and of 15 percent for durum wheat, with a total grain area of around 130,000 hectares, “which is the lowest recorded in the last three decades, in a year in which weather conditions made it possible for planting to go ahead as normal.”

(Source: http://theportugalnews.com)

O πρώτος διεθνής διαγωνισμός ελαιόλαδου στη χώρα μας είναι γεγονός!

της Κικής Τριανταφύλλη

Την πρωτοβουλία διοργάνωσης του Πρώτου Διεθνούς Διαγωνισμού Ελαιολάδου Αθηνών, «Athena International Olive Oil Competition», που θα διεξαχθεί στις 21 και 22 Μαρτίου 2016 στο ξενοδοχείο  Electra  Palace στην Πλάκα, έχει αναλάβει η Vinetum Event Management, εταιρεία επικοινωνίας με μεγάλη πείρα στην οργάνωση εκθέσεων, συνεδρίων, διαγωνισμών και άλλων εκδηλώσεων υψηλού κύρους και απαιτήσεων.

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Δυο επαγγελματίες που διατηρούν στενή σχέση με το κρασί αλλά και με το ελαιόλαδο είναι οι εμπνευστές που ανέλαβαν, σε περίοδο κρίσης, το ρίσκο της διοργάνωσης. Πρόεδρος του διαγωνισμού είναι ο Ντίνος Στεργίδης, ιδιοκτήτης και Διευθύνων Σύμβουλος της Vinetum, και Διευθύντρια η Μαρία Κατσούλη, 1η ελληνίδα οινοχόος, διαπιστευμένη γευσιγνώστρια ελαιολάδου και 1η οινοχόος ελαιολάδου της Ελλάδος, ενώ panel leader όλων των κριτών θα είναι η διεθνώς καταξιωμένη γευσιγνώστρια ελαιόλαδου Αλίκη Γαλή.

Ο διαγωνισμός «Athena International Olive Oil Competition» είναι διεθνής τόσο ως προς τους κριτές όσο και τη συμμετοχή δειγμάτων και αφορά μόνο τυποποιημένα ελαιόλαδα της κατηγορίας εξαιρετικά παρθένα (extra virgin). Οι ξένοι κριτές αποτελούν τα 2/3 του συνολικού αριθμού κριτών ενώ στόχος των οργανωτών είναι τα δείγματα ελαιολάδων από το εξωτερικό να υπερβαίνουν το 30% του συνολικού αριθμού δειγμάτων.Το πρώτο ξένο δείγμα ήρθε ήδη από την Πορτογαλία ενώ αναμένονται επίσης δείγματα από ελαιοπαραγωγούς χώρες όπως το Ισραήλ, η Ιταλία, η Ισπανία, η Κροατία, η Τουρκία, το Μαρόκο, η Τυνησία ακόμη και από το Περού.
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Greece: 15 Things You Never Knew

Greece is one of the most historic and well-known countries in the world, along with being a top vacation choice for anyone visiting Europe. Not only does it offer beautiful landscapes and plenty of sunshine, but those of us who appreciate history have a lot to learn from this significant country. We are here to tell you some lesser known facts about the ancient nation. Come back soon for part two.

Greece-1-ppcorn

Number Fifteen: It’s About the Size of Alabama

Greece is roughly the same size as this American state. However, its population (10 million plus) is more than double Alabama’s (about 4.5 million).

Number Fourteen: 13th Century Olive Trees

They are the world’s leading olive producers, which you probably knew. But did you know that there are trees that date back as far as the 13th century that are still yielding olives? That is pretty amazing.

Number Thirteen: Greece Is Almost Entirely Mountainous

A staggering amount (80%) of the country is covered by mountainous terrain. It is because of this that they have no navigable rivers there.
(Read more: http://ppcorn.com)

Inolivia at World Food Expo Korea 2015

InoliviaKoreaFoodExpoWe, at Inolivia, are pleased to announce the participation and presentation of our products in the World Food Expo Korea 2015. Inolivia olives won positive comments and taste compliments. Korean expo visitors awarded our effort to introduce Inolivia’s pure & rich flavors in the Korean market. Thank you all!

한국에서 Inolivia

Southe Korea이제 우리 Inolivia 홈페이지가 한국어로도 안내가 되어 있음을 알려 드립니다. 그래서 한국분들도 이제 한국어로 올리브에 대해서 배우고 우리의 제품을 음미하실 수가 있습니다.

우리 홈페이지 www.inolivia.com  당신을 초대합니다.

Inolivia 마케팅

Food Flags

When you think of French food, smelly cheese and grapes are probably the first things that come to mind. As is pasta at the mention of Italian cuisine, or curry when asked about Indian gastronomy. Olives and feta cheese celebrate their Greek origins and spicy orange and red curries remind viewers of Indian and Indonesian flavours.

So it’s not hard to see why these commonly associated foods have been plated up alongside others to recreate some of the world’s national flags in a collection of photographs.

Food Flags

The Australian company behind the images chose meat pie and sauce to represent its home nation, making sure to cut out star-shaped holes in the pie’s crust to stick to the flag’s design while France’s Tricoleur is completed by brie, blue cheese and grapes. More adventurous creations are seen in Thailand’s blue swimmer crab, shredded coconut and sweet chilli sauce – three local delicacies that are best served separately perhaps. Basil, pasta and tomatoes, three of the most common ingredients in Italian cuisine are used to represent the country’s green, white and red flag, while Japan’s well known red dot is formed by raw tuna on a bed of rice. Spain’s civil flag is identified by its chorizo and paella rice. Unsurprisingly, Turkish delight was used to represent it’s national namesake as was Swiss cheese, often known as Emmental. More exotic foods were sourced for the display such as South Korean kimbap, which resembles Japanese sushi but uses sesame oil to flavour rice rather than vinegar. Lebanese lavash, a soft, thin flatbread, is served with fattoush which is a bread salad made of sliced pita and vegetables.

Ahead of the Sydney International Food Festival, the company has released photographs of their efforts which cleverly serve up 17 national flags made entirely from international delicacies. The agency, WHYBIN/TBWA, is making preparations ahead of the festival’s opening in October, when hundreds of thousands are expected to gather to celebrate global cuisine for a whole month.

The festival is the largest of its kind in Australia and attracted close to 1million foodies last year. Its highlights are the Night Noodle Market and Breakfast on Bondi which invites enthusiasts to the most important meal of the day on the fames stretch of beach.

(Source: : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/)

Exports hurt by capital controls

Since 29th June 2015, life in Greece operates under capital controls. As things stand, Greeks with debit/credit cards can withdraw €60 a day (in practice €50 as most cash machines have run out of €20s), can make online transfers within the country and can pay with their cards in shops that still accept them.

What does this all mean for businesses?
conteinerr-thumb-largeWhereas individuals may be able to survive off €60 a day, at least for a while, businesses cannot. One particular problem is that Greek businesses rely heavily on imports (especially of raw materials) which they can no longer access easily; this means that, for example, a lightbulb factory reliant on copper from Chile can only make lightbulbs as long as its existing inventory holds out. Exports also fall; Greek manufacturers have already had to cancel orders from buyers abroad and more will follow soon. Domestic suppliers have begun to insist on up-front cash payments (those that didn’t already, at least). This causes similar supply-chain problems; as drivers and petrol stations demand payment in cash, which isn’t readily available, delivery delays grow, occasionally leading fruit and vegetables to go off. Redundancies are already starting to happen as businesses slim down to counter losses.

Whereas some of the bigger businesses with bank accounts abroad or foreign income streams are able to circumvent some of these controls by using their foreign bank accounts to pay suppliers, most family-run businesses and smaller firms—the backbone of the Greek economy—are not so lucky. In theory, they can apply to a special bank committee that assesses applications; in practice this is proving wholly insufficient.

Therefore, it is more than necessary to unlock payments to foreign banks to support Greek exports with raw materials from abroad. Addionally, money transfers from international customers need to be marketed as secure to overcome a situation where foreign buyers of Greek products are receiving warnings from their banks that the money they forward to Greece for the payment of their Greek suppliers may be tied down and never reach the Greek enterprises.

Unless, urgent measures to support greek imports/exports regarding banking services are taken, greek exports will be limited to a level of no return and the respective, more than vital, money flows from abroad will drop dramatically.

There is no more time to lose. Do act!

20 Healthy Foods to Keep in Your Kitchen

Moms and dads are always looking for new recipes that are quick, easy and nutritious for their family.  If you’ve got the right ingredients on hand, you can whip up a fast, flavorful meal in no time. What are these magical foods?  Get your list writing tools together and start taking notes now.

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Health.com asked registered dieticians, personal chefs and bloggers what their “must have” foods are for a well-stocked kitchen. Here’s their “should haves”.

  1. Extra-virgin olive oil.  It’s one of the primary ingredients for the healthy Mediterranean diet. Los Angeles-based personal chef Hallie Norvet recommends buying cold- pressed olive oil for the best flavor. Cook with it, but also drizzle over finished dishes, like grilled fish, pasta, and vegetables sides. The fat in olive oil is considered “good fat”, but don’t overdo it. At 120 calories in a tablespoon, a little goes a long way.
  2. Nonfat Greek yogurt. Greek yogurt is packed with 18 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving. Though it’s creamy and seems indulgent, it contains just 100 calories per serving. You can substitute yogurt for mayo and sour cream in many recipes, creating great low-cal and low-fat dishes.  
  3. Canned olives. Olives are one of those foods that people either love or don’t care for. Personally, I like them. They have a long shelf life, they can be thrown into a variety of dishes, and they have heart-healthy monounsaturated fats. Go for all natural without added sodium. Throw them on top of salads, stir them into pastas, or try snacking on them. You can eat 10 for about 50 calories. “They’re perfect when you’re craving something salty, but it’s more satisfying than a fluffy cracker in your belly,” says dietitian Jenna Braddock, RD.
  4. Honey. Honey is a natural sweetener. Sweeten homemade marinades and salad dressings. Braddock also likes to incorporate it into whole-grain baking. “Whole wheat flour can be denser, but adding honey in place of regular sugar keeps things tender and moist.” In recipes that call for sugar, swap in an equal amount of honey and reduce baking temperature by 25 degrees.

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Olive Oil, Honey Could Help Lift Greece Out of Recession

iFM0QgSNILGoGreek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras is calling on manufacturers of traditional foods and beverages, from fish-roe producers to honey makers, to play a bigger role in transforming the country into an export economy.

Greece, which saw exports fall 0.2 percent to 27.3 billion euros ($37.5 billion) in 2013, needs food and beverage companies to catch up with export-oriented industries like fuels and do more to help pull the country out of a six-year recession, Samaras told industry representatives on the island of Lesvos May 13.

More Greek food companies, some of whom were forced to look for sales outside their traditional home market as the crisis shrank the economy, should focus “on processing agricultural produce in order to bring Greek products to international markets,” Samaras said. “Today, 200 large companies account for 85 percent of production while 17,000 small and medium-sized companies have huge potential.”

elies-agrotesGreek exports of agricultural products including food, beverages and vegetable oils rose 3.5 percent by value in 2013 to 4.75 billion euros, according to the Panhellenic Exporters Association. At around 17 percent of the total value of Greek exports, the food and beverage industry trails fuels and industrial goods like machinery and chemical products as the country’s top export category.

Greece’s economy contracted at its slowest pace in four years in the first quarter, the Hellenic Statistical Authority said May 15. The European Commission forecasts that Greek GDP will grow 0.6 percent this year, its first annual expansion since 2007.

(Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/)

Spain Sets Up Watchdog to Target ‘Strategic’ Food Industries, specially Olives and Olive Oil

watchdog1Spain, the largest maker of olive oil, set up a watchdog for “strategic” food industries to bring transparency to agricultural markets and help probe wrongdoings.

Olives, olive oil and milk are among the products initially monitored under a law published today in the Official Bulletin. The Agriculture Ministry will fund the agency to enforce rules on production and ensure the “truth and integrity” of data on the origin, destination and characteristics of raw materials.

The regulator will have a role in investigating breaches and issuing penalties, according to the law, which establishes the statutes for the Food Information & Control Agency.

Spain’s olive-oil output in the first half of the 2013-2014 season from October rose to 1.75 million metric tons, almost triple the 608,900 tons in the same period a year earlier, the ministry said today. About 30 percent of output was exported.

The commodity used in everything from salads to skin care has traditionally been dominated by Mediterranean growers. With rising competition from Argentina and Chile and upstart groves in California, China and Australia, some in the market have sought more price and data transparency from major producers.

To contact the reporter on this story: Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.net

(source: http://www.businessweek.com)

European olives feed biofuel innovation

European olives are treasured for their oil, and as a zesty snack in their own right. Now researchers are also using them to make biofuel. They’re hoping to reduce CO2 output while making olive growing more profitable.biofuel1

Scientists and engineers at Vienna’s University of Technology are laboring over a shiny steel construction standing almost two storeys high. It’s a new generation “gasification plant,” which the university pioneered a couple of decades ago. It turns biomass into gas, and in Austria and a number of other European countries, that gas is used to run generators and produce electricity.

The problem operators now face is buying biomass to feed these power plants at a price which makes them competitive with other renewable and fossil fuel energy sources. With prices for wood and biofuel crops on the increase, the European Union is funding a project called which aims to turn the pomace – what’s left of the olive after its oil is pressed out – into biofuel.

“When you look at the olive mill operator he wants to get as much as possible out of the olive, and he tries everything he can to get as much out if it as possible,” Stefan Müller, a senior researcher at the university’s , told DW.

Müller is part of a team exploring the energy potential of olive pomace. He lines up bottles of the olive residue on his desk. Some are identifiable as the remains of olives, others look more like dark beach sand. Müller calls the dark sand material “olivine,” and explains it’s the feed stock for the gasification plant.

“At the end we have these residues and there isn’t much olive oil left in there. So this is a kind of waste material from an olive mill, but it still has quite a high energy content.”

More than just a canapé

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The Phenolive project, co-funded by the European Union, involves pressing every last drop of value out of the olive. At the Phenobia Laboratory, a start-up enterprise begun by the University of Bordeaux, scientists also play a role in the Phenolive project. They are identifying compounds which can be taken from the olive pomace after it has given up its oil and before it’s turned into energy.
“The laboratory specializes in the analysis of phenols in different types of raw materials for finished products such as cosmetics, food supplements or food,” Director Xavier Vitra told France’s LaBiotech web site. He added that extracting the polyphenols will add value to the pomace.

The polyphenols from olive residue are used as antioxidant additives in foods as well as nutritional supplements and cosmetics. In Europe it’s estimated the market will be worth 290 million euros ($404 million) annually within a few years, according to the Phenolive web site.

“We’re very conscious about using the resources we have and that’s why these waste materials are in focus now, to use them to provide high valuable products,” adds Stefan Müller.

Keeping energy down on the farm

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The new gasification plant being developed at Vienna’s University of Technology is small enough to be built on site at large olive plantations and olive presses. The energy it produces is intended for use within the olive oil enterprise.

“It’s important that you use the energy nearby the plant where you generate the residues so the plan is to cover the electricity demand and the heat demand of the olive oil mill with the gasification of these residues,” says Müller, adding that it also relieves the olive processors of the cost of disposing of their residues.

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Some olive pomace is already burnt as a fuel in olive producing areas of Europe however Müller’s aim is to analyze the residue and fully investigate its energy potential. Other uses for pomace include compost and fertiliser.

The university’s research team also points to the work they are doing on producing liquid fuels from biomass, and say this has the potential to allow the olive industry to run its transport vehicles on fuel produced from the olive residue. A gasification plant the team developed at Güssing, Austria, is already producing liquid fuels for vehicles.

“It’s a bio-refinery, that’s the idea. It’s renewables producing our fuels for the future,” says engineer Johannes Schmid. His aim, he says, is to demonstrate refineries do not have to burn fossil fuels.

Europe produces 80 million tonnes of olive oil pomace every year, according to the Phenolive project. If the scientists are successful, the venture could boost the olive growing industry and see costs, particularly for energy, significantly reduced.

(Source DW: http://www.dw.de/european-olives-feed-biofuel-innovation/a-17495142)