Smoked sun-dried tomato and olive spiced lamb ragu with pappardelle pasta

by KATRINA MEYNINK

Yes, making your own pasta adds time. But there is nothing better than warm, cooked-until-the-ends-of-time ragu sauce being caught indecently in strips of pasta cut to first-prize-ribbon-like proportions. If time isn’t on your side, use 100g quality dried egg pasta per person, cooked according to packet instructions.

Turn leftover lamb roast into ragu.

Ingredients

½ tbsp olive oil – 1 brown onion, finely chopped – 2 cloves garlic, chopped – 2½ cups leftover – ½ cup smoked* semi-dried tomatoes, chopped – ½ cup smoked* kalamata olives, pitted and chopped – 1-2 cups white wine – 1-2 cups chicken stock (or reserved cooking liquid from the roast lamb shoulder recipe) – 2 tbsp tomato paste – 1 x 400g tin cherry tomatoes – parmesan or pecorino, to serve – herbs of your choice, to serve
Pasta
300g plain flour, 3 eggs, salt

Method

1. For the ragu, add the oil to a large, heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until soft, golden and fragrant, stirring often to prevent it catching and burning. Add the remaining ingredients, cover and reduce heat to low, and simmer for at least 45 minutes. Check regularly on the liquid and add more wine or stock if it is reducing too quickly. Season to taste and continue to simmer until desired consistency is achieved. The sauce should be rich and thick to ensure it coats the pasta.

2. For the pasta, process ingredients and a pinch of salt in a food processor until a dough forms. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic (three to five minutes), then wrap in plastic wrap and rest at room temperature for one hour.

3. Divide pasta dough into four, then, working with one piece at a time, feed through pasta machine rollers, starting at the widest setting. Lightly flour dough as you fold and feed it through, reducing settings notch by notch, until pasta is three millimetres thick. Lightly dust the sheets with flour then fold loosely and, using a sharp knife, cut into generous strips of pasta.

4. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, add pasta and cook until al dente (about two to three minutes). Drain, add to ragu with cheese and herbs, toss and serve with extra cheese to the side.

*Smoked kalamata olives and semi-dried tomatoes are available from specialist grocers. If you can’t source smoked olives and tomatoes, use regular, and add ½ tablespoon paprika for a background smoky flavour.

(Source: https://www.goodfood.com.au)

Lesvos to Present the Best of Greek Food

In Agia Paraskevi, the local Museum of Industrial Olive Oil Production will be hosting the olive oil cooking event, combining tradition and modern cooking trends. Olive oil, whole olives and olive paste will have a central role in the recipes, while the dishes will be presented in traditional clay utensils. The event will be accompanied by speeches regarding the pottery art of Lesvos.

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(Source: http://greece.greekreporter.com)

Olive you. Olive you more!

Cooking with this adored Mediterranean fruit

It’s difficult to describe the tastes and flavors of foods. Olives are an especially hard case. Nothing tastes remotely like them, so it’s impossible to compare them to any other food.

Olive bread

Olive bread

Novelist Lawrence Durrell did the best job of evoking them when he wrote, “The whole Mediterranean, the sculpture, the palms, the gold beads, the bearded heroes . . . all of it seems to rise in the sour, pungent smell of these black olives between the teeth. A taste older than meat, older than wine. A taste as old as cold water.”

Cultivation of the olive is certainly ancient. The gnarly trees, their green-and-silver leaves trembling in any breeze, are native to the Mediterranean. In Israel, there’s evidence of olive oil production in 6000 BC, and on the Greek island of Naxos, archeologists have discovered remains of olive oil in a jug dating to 4,000 BC.

Indeed, the olive tree was so vital to the Greeks that they embedded it in their myth of Athena. When she struck the Acropolis with her spear, the first olive tree sprang forth. This magic underwhelmed the witnesses, who grumbled that the sea-god Poseidon would have given them a better gift. But after Athena taught them how to cultivate the tree and process its products for food, light and timber, they realized its many virtues and named their city Athens in her honor.

Greece remains a major grower, producing 11 percent of the world’s olives and consuming 23 liters of olive oil per person per year. (Americans consume about one liter.)

(Source: http://www.amherstbulletin.com) Continue reading

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Black olive and lemon paté

A fabulous quartet of flavours – the richness of the cream cheese is cut through with the acidity of lemon and the earthy tang of olives.

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Serves 4
100g olives, pitted
250g cream cheese
Juice of 1 lemon
Black pepper

1 Add the pitted olives to a blender and blend until almost smooth.

2 Transfer the olive mix to a fine sieve and sit it over a bowl to drain any excess liquid – around 5 minutes should do it. However, if your olives were in liquid it might take a little longer.

3 Next, add the cream cheese to a mixing bowl with the olives, lemon juice and black pepper. Carefully fold together until incorporated.

4 Place a round pastry cutter in the centre of a serving plate, add the paté and tamp down. Remove the ring and serve with some dressed leaves and hot toast.
Andrew Dargue, vanillablack.co.uk

(Source: https://www.theguardian.com)

Cook to Get Cut: 5 Nutritious Recipes Using Olives

Healthy Open-Face Breakfast Sandwiches

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Most breakfast sandwiches include a combination of eggs, bacon, and cheese. This triple threat always tastes delicious, but it’s not the healthiest way to start your day. Instead of topping your breakfast with a mound of smoked pork, try olives with this Mediterranean-inspired sandwich from Chowhound. They add just as much flavor without requiring any additional cooking, which means this sandwich is pretty speedy.

As for the specifics, olives contain 65 calories per ounce compared to bacon’s 149 calories for the same amount, making them a great way to lighten up this breakfast classic. And even though they’re loaded with the salty taste most of us love, olives still contain less sodium per ounce than bacon.

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 slices spelt or other bread
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1½ cups baby kale or spinach
  • ¼ cup pitted kalamata olives, sliced
  • ½ avocado, sliced into four pieces
  • ⅓ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • Salt and pepper

Directions: Heat olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add eggs and begin to cook. Meanwhile toast bread under the broiler or with a toaster. Cook eggs to your desired doneness, spooning some of the oil over the tops of the whites to help them cook. Remove eggs to a plate.

Increase skillet heat to high and add red pepper flakes. Stir in kale and cook, tossing, until just wilted, about 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in olives.

Top each slice of toast with an equal amount of greens. Add an egg to each, then top with avocado, feta, and a sprinkle each of salt and pepper. Serve.

(Source: http://www.cheatsheet.com)

When life gives you onions, no need to cry

Karen Makowski wrote in a few months ago, looking for salad recipes to use up a bumper crop of onions from the garden. Clearly, it’s not gardening season right now, but we can dream. In the meantime, these recipes also work as refreshing winter salads.
Thanks to Linda Snider for her recipe for onion and orange salad. I also found a version that combines onions with tomatoes, cucumbers and olives.

Onion and Orange Salad

onion16 large oranges
45 ml (3 tbsp) red wine vinegar
90 ml (6 tbsp) olive oil
5 ml (1 tsp) dried oregano
Salad greens
1 red onion, thinly sliced in rings
250 ml (1 cup) black olives (see note)
Black pepper, to taste
60 ml (1/4 cup) chopped fresh chives
Peel oranges and then cut each into 4 or 5 crosswise slices. Transfer to shallow dish and drizzle with vinegar and oil and sprinkle with oregano. Toss gently, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
Arrange salad greens in a shallow serving dish. Toss oranges again, arrange on greens. Arrange onion and black olives on top. Add pepper to taste and garnish with chives.

Tester’s notes: I like the crunch and the combination of intense flavours in this easy salad. Linda continues the fruit theme by replacing the olives with blueberries. I did use olives — I like the mix of hot, sweet and salty tastes — but I cut the amount to about 60 ml (1/4 cup), using them as an accent rather than a main ingredient.

Onion, Tomato and Cucumber Salad

onion24 plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise, seeded and thinly sliced
1/4 red onion, peeled, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
1 English cucumber, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
30 ml (2 tbsp) olive oil
15 ml (1 tbsp) red wine vinegar
Salt and pepper, to taste
Place tomatoes, onions and cucumbers in a serving bowl. Drizzle with oil and vinegar and add salt and pepper to taste. Let flavours blend for 30 minutes, then serve.

Tester’s notes: Another easy chopped salad. Some crumbled feta cheese would be a good addition.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 4, 2015 C5

(Source: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com)

Lamb Chops with Aubergine, Feta and Anchovies

SCA_14-01-2015_OUR_MORETON_BAY_04_lamb chops_t620INGREDIENTS:
1 tbs pesto, zest and juice of 1 lemon, 2 cloves garlic, 8 lamb loin chops, fat removed
Salad: ¼ cup olive oil, 1 eggplant cut into 5mm slices, 250g cherry tomatoes, 150g green beans cut in half and blanched, 150g feta, ½ cup black olives, 4 anchovies, chopped, ¼ cup basil leaves, 1 tbs olive oil, 1 tbs balsamic vinegar, salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

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Roasted Vegetable Salad With Olives and Cheese

635566601426725714-phxdc5-61j5qx1o6nb3k3wq7hf-original¾ cup olive oil | ¼ cup balsamic vinegar | 1 large red onion, cut into ¾-inch-thick rounds | 12 baby beets, stems trimmed to 1 inch, peeled, halved lengthwise | 3 small zucchini, each cut lengthwise into 4 slices | 1 small eggplant, diced into 1-inch pieces | 2 large red bell peppers, cut into 2-inch-wide strips | 6 slices country-style French bread | Additional olive oil | 10 cups mixed baby greens | 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil | 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or green onions | 1 tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram | ¾ cup chilled fresh mild goat cheese (such as Montrachet), crumbled (about 3 ounces) | ½ cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese (about 2 ounces) | ¾ cup brine-cured black olives (such as kalamata)

Heat grill on medium-high heat. Whisk ¾ cup oil and vinegar in medium bowl until well-blended. Place onion, beets, zucchini, eggplants and red bell pepper on baking sheet. Brush both sides with some of the vinaigrette. Sprinkle vegetables with salt and pepper. Grill vegetables until just cooked through, about 10 minutes per side for beets, 6 minutes per side for onion and 4 minutes per side for zucchini, eggplant and peppers. Remove the vegetables according to individual cooking requirements. Vegetables can be grilled 1 hour ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Brush bread with additional olive oil; sprinkle with pepper. Grill bread until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes per side.

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spaghetti with fresh tomato, olives & tuna

INGREDIENTS
  • h300_w300_m5_bwhite375 g packet spaghetti
  • 425 g can tuna in springwater, drained, flaked
  • 3 tomatoes, diced
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/3 cup pitted kalamata olives, thinly sliced
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 long red chilli, seeded, finely chopped
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • 80 g low-fat fetta, crumbled
  • salad, to serve
PREPARATION
  • 1Cook spaghetti in a large pan of boiling, salted water, according to packet instructions. Drain well and return to pan.
  • 2Toss remaining ingredients, except fetta, through pasta. Season to taste.
  • 3Serve pasta sprinkled with feta. Accompany with salad, if desired.
NOTES
  • This would also be delicious with pan-fried prawns instead of tuna.

(Source: http://www.msn.com)

Nut and Olive rounds

Delicious flavours of the Med transformed into crispy bites

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Makes 24 rounds

INGREDIENTS
1 roll of frozen puff pastry, thawed
125ml sweet chilli sauce
125g Kalamata olives, chopped
100g hazel nuts, chopped
100g pecan nuts, chopped
100g marinated sun-dried tomatoes
250g mozzarella cheese, grated

METHOD
1 Preheat oven to 180C.
2 Unroll the pastry and spread the sweet chilli sauce over it.
3 Arrange the olives, nuts, sun-dried tomatoes and cheese on the pastry.
4 Roll up the pastry lengthways, cover with cling film and place into the fridge for half an hour to chill.
5 Once the roll has firmed up, slice it into 1cm slices and place the slices onto a greased or sprayed baking tray.
6 Bake for 20 minutes or until the pastry is puffed and golden. Serve while still warm.

(Source: http://www.ahlanlive.com)

Roast Cod with Artichokes and Olives

Ingredients
fnm_120113-roast-cod-with-artichokes-recipe_s4x3.jpg.rend.sni12col.landscape1 pound Yukon gold potatoes, thinly sliced
1 9 -ounce box frozen artichoke hearts, thawed
1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 6 -ounce cod fillets
Juice of 1/2 lemon, plus wedges for serving
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Directions
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Combine the potato slices, artichokes, olives, rosemary, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper in a large bowl. Spread the mixture evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet; bake until the vegetables are tender and lightly browned, about 20 minutes.
Brush the fish with 1 tablespoon olive oil and season with 1 teaspoon salt and a few grinds of pepper. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and set the fish on top of the vegetables. Return to the oven and continue baking until the fish is opaque and the vegetables are golden brown, about 10 minutes.
Drizzle the fish with the lemon juice and the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil. Sprinkle with the parsley and serve with lemon wedges.
Per serving: Calories 373; Fat 17 g (Saturated 2 g); Cholesterol 52 mg; Sodium 1,219 mg; Carbohydrate 24 g; Fiber 5 g; Protein 30 g
Photograph by Justin Walker
Recipe courtesy Food Network Magazine

(Source: http://www.foodnetwork.com)

Citrus-Marinated Olives

Take these olives along on your next picnic.

ingredients

  • 1035981 1/2 cups Kalamata olives or other brine-cured black olives
  • 1 1/2 cups cracked brine-cured green olives (Try Inolivia)
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 6 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange peel
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper

preparation

Combine all ingredients in large heavy-duty resealable plastic bag. Shake bag to blend ingredients. Refrigerate at least 1 day and up to 3 days, turning bag occasionally. Transfer olives and some marinade to bowl. Let stand 1 hour at room temperature before serving.

(Source: http://www.epicurious.com)

Easy dinner recipes: Chicken three ways in an hour or less

When you’re looking for easy dinner ideas, you can’t go wrong with chicken. It pairs well with almost any flavorings and can be cooked in so many ways. These great ideas come together in an hour or less:

Chicken and orzo with lemon and olives: This dish is one-pot perfection. Chicken drumsticks cook with a simple medley of orzo pasta, lemon wedges, olives, oregano, garlic and bay leaves in a richly flavored dish that comes together in only 45 minutes.

joweiukn-recipe-db

Cayenne Cafe chicken with pomegranate-walnut sauce: A great way to showcase fresh pomegranates in season, this simple grilled chicken dish highlights the fruit in a rich garlic-walnut sauce that plays the tartness of the pomegranate against the sweetness of dark brown sugar.

Roast chicken with fried artichokes and lemons: Tender roast chicken is served with crisp fried artichoke and lemon “chips.” The whole meal comes together in only an hour. You can find the recipe below.

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Moutabel Al Marjan

Chef Mounir Al Khatib of Al Marjan in Waldorf Astoria Ras Al Khaimah shares this simple but delicious recipe

By Mounir Al Khatib | Published: 12:44 November 18, 2014

1555056163INGREDIENTS

Carrot | Beetroot | Cauliflower | Garlic | Tahini oil | Salt | Lemon salt | Olive oil | Black olives

PREPARATION

For the moutabel carrot:

Peel the carrot and steam until cooked. Leave to cool. In a mixer, add the cooked carrot, garlic, tahini oil, salt and lemon salt. Blend to a smooth, paste-like consistency. Garnish with olive oil and black olives.

For the moutabel cauliflower:

Follow the same procedure above, but replace carrot with cauliflower.

For the moutabel beetroot:

Steam the beetroot until cooked then let it cool. Peel the beetroot and put in a blender. Add garlic, tahini oil, salt, lemon salt and blend to a smooth, paste-like consistency. Garnish with olive oil.

(Source: http://gulfnews.com)

Olive Tapenade, Arugula and Goat Cheese Spread

Recipe tested by Terri Milligan | Read more:  All about olives | Makes:  3 cups

Ingredients:
b99384439z.1_20141104144800_000_g3s8g8np.1-0¼ cup pitted green olives
½ cup pitted Kalamata olives
2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
2/3 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon capers, drained
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Zest of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon chopped mint
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
Toasted French bread slices or flatbread crackers
8 ounces goat cheese, room temperature
1 cup loosely packed arugula leaves, finely chopped
Preparation:

To make tapenade, place all ingredients up to and including the mint and cilantro into a food processor. Pulse to combine. Do not overprocess. With machine running, slowly add the olive oil. Taste and season as needed with salt and pepper. Be careful not to oversalt the mixture as the olives and capers will have salt on them. Spread the French bread slices or flatbread crackers with the olive tapenade. Dot with the room-temperature goat cheese. Garnish with finely chopped arugula.

(Source: http://www.jsonline.com)

-daily-dose-price

Robin’s Rescue: 7 low-carb, meat-free, easy meals

Robin Miller, Special for the Republic12:38 p.m. MST October 29, 2014

Quinoa pilaf with olives, pine nuts and feta: Cook 1 cup of quinoa according to the package instructions. While still warm, add 1 cup diced fresh tomato, 1/2cup pitted and sliced kalamata (Greek) olives, 1/4 cup lightly toasted pine nuts, 1/4cup chopped fresh parsley, 1/4 cup chopped scallions, 1 teaspoon dried oregano and 1 teaspoon dried thyme. In a small bowl, whisk together 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1teaspoon Dijon mustard. Add the mixture to the quinoa mixture and toss to combine. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Spoon the quinoa mixture into bowls and top with crumbled feta cheese.

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Lentils and couscous with garlic-wilted spinach and Parmesan: Cook 2cups of lentils according to the package instructions. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 2-3 cloves minced garlic and cook 2 minutes. Add 5 ounces of baby spinach leaves and cook for 1 minute, until the spinach wilts. Transfer the lentils to a large bowl and add the spinach, 11/2cups cooked whole-wheat couscous, 1/4cup grated Parmesan cheese and 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil. Toss to combine, adding a little more olive oil if necessary to keep mixture moist. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into bowls and top with grated or shaved Parmesan cheese.

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