Secrets of One of the World’s Healthiest Villages

Pioppi, Italy is known as the world’s healthiest village because many of its residents live past the age of 100. What are the factors responsible for their remarkable longevity? A leading doctor in Britain revealed their secrets.

The villagers have a diet of whole natural foods comprised of things that are in season and available according to the local climate.– Kathy Gruver

Imagine living in a community where the average man lives to be 89 and many reach the 100-year mark. Picture what it would be like to enjoy one’s golden years without dementia or type 2 diabetes, maladies that are an integral part of aging in the rest of the world. After hearing about Pioppi, cardiologist Aseem Malhotra became fascinated with discovering what diet kept the residents so healthy and what lessons could be learned from them.

After studying the village, Malhotra developed a formula for optimal health. For starters, the Pioppians have a very low sugar intake, eating it only once per week. It is this dietary practice that the doctor considers essential for their good health. He contends that western society’s fear of fat is to blame for the high consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Malhotra attributes these foods as the cause of the widespread incidence of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.


Pioppi has received notoriety because it’s known as the home of the Mediterranean diet. As the villagers have no supermarket, their diet consists largely of vegetables, olive oil and fish. They also eat cheese, but other dairy products aren’t available. Pasta and bread are consumed in small quantities. In addition to sugar, their diet is low in meat and refined carbohydrates.

Other lifestyle practices aside from a healthful diet play a role. The villagers get seven hours of sleep per night and experience freedom from much stress. Although it isn’t intentional, intermittent fasting is a natural part of their lives. They don’t engage in exercise per se, but they’re very active.

Malhotra is the coauthor of a new book, The Pioppi Diet: A 21-Day Lifestyle Plan. Below are his top recommendations for vibrant health and longevity based on the Pioppians:

• Don’t fear fat; sugar and refined carbs are the enemies.
• Keep moving. Exercise for health, not weight loss (and walking is best).
• Extra virgin olive oil is medicine, as is a small handful of nuts – eat both, every day.
• Get seven hours of sleep a night.
• Stop counting calories because not all are created equal.
• Eat 10 eggs a week. They’re satiating and full of protein.
• Have two portions of vegetables in at least two meals a day.
• Fast once a week for 24 hours. Have dinner, then don’t have breakfast or lunch the next day.

While Malhotra is an allopathic doctor, his advisories are in line with tenets of naturopathic medicine. Olive Oil Times sought out the perspective of Kathy Gruver, natural health author, speaker and practitioner. “I think there are several points to this that we can all adopt. The villagers have a diet of whole natural foods comprised of things that are in season and available according to the local climate,” she said.

“This is unlike the western diet that involves a huge amount of processed and packaged foods. It’s not only laden with sugar but also contains fake and unhealthful components such as high fructose corn syrup, MSG, artificial sweeteners, additives, preservatives and fast food. Our bodies weren’t made to process all this fake stuff. It doesn’t know what to do with it,” Gruver added.

“Furthermore, he mentions though they don’t ‘exercise,’ they are very active. We put so much emphasis on workouts, which can be a big turn-off to people. They think it means that they have to go to the gym or run on a treadmill. But it’s about moving your body in a way that works for you.”

“I laud the doctor’s suggestions on sleep, stress and intermittent fasting as well. All of these things, clearly, are combining to promote optimal health and a longer life.”

VILLAGERS IN NORTHERN CRETE HAVE LOW RATES OF HEART DISEASE DESPITE FATTY DIET

People living in isolated Greek mountains villages live long and healthy lives thanks to a unique gene that protects them against heart disease, recent research has found.

Scientists studied the villagers in an area of northern Crete because they had low cases of heart disease despite eating lots of animal fats.

The study, for the first time made a genetic portrait of the population of of Zoniana and Anogia by sequencing the entire genome of 250 individuals.

They found a new genetic variant, common among villagers, which appears to protect the heart by lowering levels of ‘bad’ fats and cholesterol.

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute found that the variant is 40 times more common in this small Greek population than in other European populations.

Lead author Professor Eleftheria Zeggini said: ‘Genetic studies like this can help us begin to understand why this is.’

(Sources: https://www.oliveoiltimes.com, http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

The world’s first unisex contraceptive – made from olives

50539508_l_620x310A natural substitute for the morning after pill has been found in olives.
Eating handfuls of olives will not prevent pregnancy, but a chemical found within them can stop a sperm from reaching an egg, the Daily Mail reports.
The natural compound, also found in grapes and mangos, could replace the morning after pill if taken within five hours of unprotected sex.
It could also become the first unisex pill, able to be taken by both men and women without the current side-effects of heart disease, blood clots and depression.
The chemical, lupeol, works by stopping the sperm’s “power kick”, where its tail is whipped up forcefully to propel it towards and into the egg. Another chemical, primisterin, which is found in the thunder god vine used in Chinese medicine, has the same effect.
Researchers at the University of Berkeley in the US say it could be available within two years for women to take before or after sex, and within four years for men.
Co-author Dr Polina Lishko said: “It is not toxic to sperm cells – they still can move. But they cannot develop this powerful stroke, because this whole activation pathway is shut down. This is a potentially safer morning after pill, regular pill, and a future male contraceptive. Essentially it is a future version of a unisex contraceptive.”
Fertility expert Allan Pacey, professor of andrology at the University of Sheffield, said:
“This is probably one of the most innovative approaches to male contraception, allowing men to take equal responsibility for family planning that we have seen in a long time.
“Scientists have been tinkering with different kinds of hormonal contraceptives for men for 30 years and they have not yet got them to marketplace, so we really need a new kind of approach like this.”
Continue reading

Oliven gegen das Vergessen

unnamedDr. Anke Sauter Marketing und Kommunikation
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Ein neues Forschungsprojekt untersucht Inhaltsstoffe der Olive, die vor Alzheimer schützen sollen. Beteiligt sind Forscher der Goethe Universität Frankfurt, der Technischen Universität Darmstadt und des Darmstädter N-Zyme BioTec. Das Projekt “NeurOliv” wird vom Bundesministerium für Forschung und Wissenschaft gefördert.

FRANKFURT/DARMSTADT. Längst gilt als erwiesen: Wer sich mediterran ernährt und körperlich und geistig aktiv ist, wird weniger wahrscheinlich an der Alterskrankheit Demenz leiden. Vor allem Oliven scheinen dabei eine Rolle zu spielen. Doch welche Inhaltsstoffe der kleinen ovalen Frucht sind es genau, die so hilfreich wirken? Dies will ein hessischer Verbund von Forschern der Frankfurter Goethe-Universität, der Technischen Universität (TU) Darmstadt und dem Darmstädter Unternehmen N-Zyme BioTec GmbH herausfinden. Das auf drei Jahre angelegte Projekt „NeurOliv“ hat ein Projektvolumen von 1,3 Millionen Euro und wird im Rahmen der High-Tech Initiative KMU-innovativ Biochance vom Bundesministerium für Forschung und Bildung gefördert.
Die Kooperation vereint mehrere Ansätze, wobei die Initiative von N-Zyme BioTec GmbH ausging. Ziel ist es, mit Hilfe der Olivenstoffe neue funktionelle Lebensmittel für die alternde Gesellschaft entwickeln zu können, die vor der Alzheimerkrankheit schützen. „Wir wollen prüfen, ob Olivenpolyphenole auch einen Beitrag zur Heilung der Krankheit leisten können. Daher sehen wir unsere Produkte auch im Bereich der Arzneimittel angesiedelt“, sagt Dr. Joachim Tretzel, Geschäftsführer von N-Zyme BioTec GmbH. Gerade kleine und mittlere Unternehmen sollen durch die High-Tech Initiative der Bundesregierung gefördert werden.
Das Team um Prof. Heribert Warzecha am Fachbereich Biologie der TU Darmstadt befasst sich mit der Entwicklung neuer biotechnologischer Verfahren, um die spezifischen Pflanzenstoffe zu gewinnen. Mit den entsprechenden genetischen Informationen sollen Bakterienkulturen helfen, Inhaltsstoffe in reiner und definierter Form darzustellen. „Durch unsere neuen Techniken lassen sich das aufwendige Extrahieren von Stoffen aus Olivenblättern erleichtern und die geringen Ausbeuten deutlich verbessern“, erklärt Warzecha. „Damit sind wir bei der Produktion auch unabhängig von der saisonalen Oliven-Ernte in den Anbaugebieten“, freut sich Dr. Stefan Marx, ebenfalls Geschäftsführer von N-Zyme BioTec.
Die Arbeitsgruppe „nutritional-neuroscience“ des Lebensmittelchemikers Dr. Gunter Eckert, Privatdozent an der Goethe-Universität (GU) Frankfurt, wird die Wirksamkeit dieser biotechnologisch hergestellten Olivenstoffe testen. Dabei werden zunächst die Olivenstoffe in Zellkulturmodellen getestet, die möglicherweise vor der Alzheimer Krankheit schützen. „Wir sehen uns vor allem Veränderung in den Kraftwerken der Nervenzellen (Mitochondrien) an, die sich bei der Alzheimer-Krankheit schon früh verändern“, so Eckert. Die aktivsten Verbindungen sollen dann in einem Mausmodell der Krankheit zeigen, dass sie die Gehirnfunktion verbessern können.
„Wir überprüfen die These, dass bestimmte Polyphenole aus Oliven Krankheitsprozesse im Gehirns verlangsamen, die mitochondriale Dysfunktion verbessern und somit Evidenzen für einen Schutz vor Alzheimer liefern“, fasst Fachpharmakologe Eckert sein Forschungsziel zusammen. Die GU-Forscher erhalten 288.000 Euro Fördermittel für dieses Projekt. In einem anderen Forschungsprojekt nimmt Eckert den Zusammenhang zwischen Ernährung und Bewegung in Hinblick auf die Entwicklung von Alzheimer unter die Lupe.
Bilder zum Download finden Sie unter
Bildunterschriften:
Bild 1 (stehend vor Gebäude): Die Mitglieder des BMBF-Projektes „NeurOliv“ treffen sich zum Kick-off Meeting des das Projektes. Erste Reihe, von links: Dr. Jens Zotzel (N-ZYME), Alexander Webersinke (N-ZYME), Alla Sarafeddivo (N-ZYME), Christopher Fuchs (N-ZYME), Jascha Folk (TU Darmstadt). Zweite Reihe, von links: Dr. Stefan Marx (N-ZYME), Dr. Joachim Tretzel (N-ZYME), Prof. Warzecha (TU Darmstadt), Dr. Gunter Eckert (GU).
Bild 2 (am Konferenztisch): Die Mitglieder des BMBF-KMU Innovativ Konsortiums diskutieren das Projekt „NeurOliv“. Von links: Alla Sarafeddivo (N-ZYME), Christopher Fuchs (N-ZYME), Dr. Jens Zotzel (N-ZYME), Dr. Gunter Eckert (GU), Jascha Folk (TU Darmstadt), Prof. Warzecha (TU Darmstadt), Dr. Stefan Marx (N-ZYME), Dr. Joachim Tretzel (N-ZYME), Alexander Webersinke (N-ZYME).

Informationen: Dr. Gunter Eckert, Goethe-Universität, Tel. (069) 798-29378, E-Mail g.p.eckert@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Dr. Stefan Marx, N-Zyme BioTec GmbH Tel. (06151) 3912-772, E-Mail: marx@n-zyme.de; Prof. Dr. Heribert Warzecha, TU Darmstadt, Tel. (06151) 16-20900, E-Mail: warzecha@bio.tu-darmstadt.de

Die Goethe-Universität ist eine forschungsstarke Hochschule in der europäischen Finanzmetropole Frankfurt. 1914 gegründet mit rein privaten Mitteln von freiheitlich orientierten Frankfurter Bürgerinnen und Bürgern, fühlt sie sich als Bürgeruniversität bis heute dem Motto “Wissenschaft für die Gesellschaft” in Forschung und Lehre verpflichtet. Viele der Frauen und Männer der ersten Stunde waren jüdische Stifter. In den letzten 100 Jahren hat die Goethe-Universität Pionierleistungen erbracht auf den Feldern der Sozial-, Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Chemie, Quantenphysik, Hirnforschung und Arbeitsrecht. Am 1. Januar 2008 gewann sie mit der Rückkehr zu ihren historischen Wurzeln als Stiftungsuniversität ein einzigartiges Maß an Eigenständigkeit. Heute ist sie eine der zehn drittmittelstärksten und drei größten Universitäten Deutschlands mit drei Exzellenzclustern in Medizin, Lebenswissenschaften sowie Geisteswissenschaften.

Herausgeber: Die Präsidentin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. Redaktion: Dr. Anke Sauter, Wissenschaftsredakteurin, Abteilung Marketing und Kommunikation, Theodor-W.-Adorno-Platz 1, 60323 Frankfurt am Main, Tel.: (069) 798-12472, Fax: (069) 798-28530.


(Source: https://idw-online.de)

Scientists REVEAL magnesium is the secret magic ingredient to healthy Mediterranean Diet

The secret ingredient which makes the Mediterranean Diet so healthy is magnesium, according to the latest research. By CYRIL DIXON

Scientists say the mineral is more important than previously thought in slashing the risk of heart disease, strokes and diabetes. And they are convinced the results of their work explain why foods such as nuts, whole grains, leafy greens and oily fish help people live longer. The team conducted the largest ever analysis of dietary magnesium data, covering more than a million people in nine countries. Mediterranean-Diet-741021They found that eating a diet rich in magnesium cut the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke by 12 per cent. The danger of developing Type 2 diabetes was reduced by 26 per cent, according to the research at Zhejiang University’s School of Public Health in eastern China.

Low levels of magnesium in the body have been associated with a range of diseases. Dr Fudi Wang

Dr Fudi Wang, who led the project, said: “Low levels of magnesium in the body have been associated with a range of diseases. “But no conclusive evidence has been put forward on the link between dietary magnesium and health risks. “Our analysis provides the most up-to-date evidence supporting a link between the role of magnesium in food and reducing the risk of disease.” His team, based at one of China’s top universities, analysed data from 40 studies covering a seven-year period. Their findings, published in the journal BMC Medicine, suggest people in “developed” countries in the West do not take in enough magnesium. 3B284E5C00000578-0-image-a-33_1481154562612Dr Wang believes public health departments should encourage people to consume more – and to get it from several sources because individual food items do not contain enough. He said: “Green leafy vegetables such as spinach provide magnesium while spices, nuts, beans, cocoa and whole grains are also rich sources. 
“Importantly, the daily requirement is difficult to achieve through a single serving of any one food item.”

(Source: http://www.express.co.uk)

20 Healthy foods that look like the body parts they’re good for

They say you are what you eat, but we never thought that meant “literally” speaking.

These 18 foods actually reflect the body parts they provide nutrients for – read along to know why they say eating carrots is good for your eyes – it’s not just a coincidence.

olive_ovary1. Olives

Olives assist the health and function of the ovaries. Olives and olive oil contain an abundance of phenolic antioxidants as well as the anti-cancer compounds squalene and terpenoid.


grapes2. Grapes

Grapes have an undeniable resemblance to the alveoli of the lungs. Alveoli are tiny sacs within our lungs that allow oxygen and carbon dioxide to move between the lungs and bloodstream. Including red/purple grapes in your diet has proven to reduce the risk of lung cancer and emphysema (a long term disease of the lungs).


kidney_beans3. Kidney Beans

Interesting fact: the Kidney beans got their name due to the resemblance they have to real human kidneys. Kidney beans have significant amounts of fiber and soluble fiber, they are also very high in protein and iron.


sweet-pancreas4. Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes resemble the pancreas and can actually balance the glycemic index of diabetics. Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene). They are also a very good source of vitamin C, manganese, copper, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B6. Additionally, they are a good source of potassium, dietary fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, and phosphorus.

Continue reading

Olives and Bone: A Green Osteoporosis Prevention Option

ijerph-logoKok-Yong Chin*  and Soelaiman Ima-Nirwana

Department of Pharmacology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, 56000 Cheras, Malaysia

Abstract

Skeletal degeneration due to aging, also known as osteoporosis, is a major health problem worldwide. Certain dietary components confer protection to our skeletal system against osteoporosis. Consumption of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols has been shown to improve bone health. This review aims to summarize the current evidence from cellular, animal and human studies on the skeletal protective effects of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols. Animal studies showed that supplementation of olives, olive oil or olive polyphenols could improve skeletal health assessed via bone mineral density, bone biomechanical strength and bone turnover markers in ovariectomized rats, especially those with inflammation. The beneficial effects of olive oil and olive polyphenols could be attributed to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. However, variations in the bone protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects between studies were noted. Cellular studies demonstrated that olive polyphenols enhanced proliferation of pre-osteoblasts, differentiation of osteoblasts and decreased the formation of osteoclast-like cells. However, the exact molecular pathways for its bone health promoting effects are yet to be clearly elucidated. Human studies revealed that daily consumption of olive oil could prevent the decline in bone mineral density and improve bone turnover markers. As a conclusion, olives, olive oil and its polyphenols are potential dietary interventions to prevent osteoporosis among the elderly.

(Download full article: pdf)

(Source: http://www.mdpi.com)

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Frisch gebacken: mediterrane Burger mit Radieschen

Den Geschmack des Sommers beschwört Steirerschlössl-Küchenchef Johannes Marterer herauf – mit Oliven-Buns und einer köstlichen gesunden Füllung.

marterer_last_004_1462548622382619_v0_hFür den Teig:
650 g Weizenmehl, 50 g Roggenmehl, 7 g Salz, 30 g Maizena, 450 g zimmerwarmes Wasser, 20 g Germ, 200 g schwarze Oliven ohne Kern.

Für den Belag:
etwas Sauerrahm, Zucchini, Olivenöl und Knoblauch zum Anbraten, Paradeiser, Radieschen, Koriandergrün, Basilikum, Meersalz, Pfeffer.

Zubereitung
1. Für den Teig die Oliven klein hacken. Weizenmehl, Maizena, Roggenmehl und Salz mischen. Germ in Wasser auflösen, mit den Oliven in das Mehl einarbeiten, zu einem Teig kneten. Mit einem Geschirrtuch abdecken, 20 Min. an einem warmen Ort gehen lassen.
2. Noch einmal durchkneten, Teig zu einer Rolle formen. Teigstücke von je 65 g abtrennen und zu Kugeln formen. Auf ein mit Backpapier ausgekleidetes Backblech legen – nicht zu eng, besser ein zweites Blech verwenden. Weitere 20 Min. zugedeckt gehen lassen.
3. Im vorgeheizten Herd bei 200 Grad etwa 20 Min. oder etwas länger – je nach Herd –backen.
4. Radieschen und Paradeiser in Scheiben schneiden. Kräuter grob hacken. Zucchini in Scheiben schneiden, mit ein paar ungeschälten Knoblauchzehen in wenig Olivenöl scharf anbraten.
5. Zusammenbauen: Weckerl in der Mitte auseinanderschneiden. Den Brotboden mit 1 TL Sauerrahm bestreichen. Mit Zucchini, Paradeisern, Radieschen, Kräutern belegen, mit Salz und Pfeffer würzen. Olivenweckerldeckel aufsetzen.

(Source: http://www.kleinezeitung.at)

7 Snacks, die ihr den ganzen Abend essen könnt

Ihr sucht gesunde Alternativen zu Chips, Schokolade, Plätzchen und Co, die ihr abends bedenkenlos naschen könnt? Kein Problem! Von diesen 7 Snacks nehmt ihr definitiv nicht zu.

snacks-gabel-r

Grüne und schwarze Oliven

Statt zu Chips oder Nachos mit Käse-Dip solltet ihr besser zu grünen und schwarzen Oliven greifen. Am besten schmecken diese pur oder in Olivenöl. Die Früchte des Ölbaums sind reich an ungesättigten Fettsäuren, Vitamin A, Natrium, Kalcium und Eisen – und sollen sogar vor Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen schützen. Schwarze Oliven weisen etwa 185 Kalorien, grüne Oliven rund 140 Kalorien pro 100 Gramm auf. Zum Vergleich: 100 Gramm Kartoffelchips haben etwa 535 Kalorien.

oliven-c

Eingelegte Gurken

Gurken, die man selbst eingelegt hat, sind ein wunderbar würziger und gesunder Snack für zwischendurch – und noch dazu kalorienarm. Auf 100 Gramm Cornichons kommen lediglich 15 Kalorien, aber auch eingelegte Honiggurken sind mit 70 Kalorien immer noch ein leichter Snack. Dasselbe gilt für Mixed Pickles, bei dem ihr bedenkenlos den ganzen Abend zugreifen könnt.

eingelegte-gurken-c

More at: http://www.brigitte.de

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Cook to Get Cut: 5 Nutritious Recipes Using Olives

Healthy Open-Face Breakfast Sandwiches

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Most breakfast sandwiches include a combination of eggs, bacon, and cheese. This triple threat always tastes delicious, but it’s not the healthiest way to start your day. Instead of topping your breakfast with a mound of smoked pork, try olives with this Mediterranean-inspired sandwich from Chowhound. They add just as much flavor without requiring any additional cooking, which means this sandwich is pretty speedy.

As for the specifics, olives contain 65 calories per ounce compared to bacon’s 149 calories for the same amount, making them a great way to lighten up this breakfast classic. And even though they’re loaded with the salty taste most of us love, olives still contain less sodium per ounce than bacon.

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 slices spelt or other bread
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1½ cups baby kale or spinach
  • ¼ cup pitted kalamata olives, sliced
  • ½ avocado, sliced into four pieces
  • ⅓ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • Salt and pepper

Directions: Heat olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add eggs and begin to cook. Meanwhile toast bread under the broiler or with a toaster. Cook eggs to your desired doneness, spooning some of the oil over the tops of the whites to help them cook. Remove eggs to a plate.

Increase skillet heat to high and add red pepper flakes. Stir in kale and cook, tossing, until just wilted, about 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in olives.

Top each slice of toast with an equal amount of greens. Add an egg to each, then top with avocado, feta, and a sprinkle each of salt and pepper. Serve.

(Source: http://www.cheatsheet.com)

Amazing Health Benefits Of Olives

Written by: Bindu Published: Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 2:01 [IST]
olivesforovaries-15-1455537537Olives are one of the most widely enjoyed foods across the globe. Olives are the fruits that come in a wide range of varieties. They are bitter in taste and are highly used in the preparation of salads. Olives are one of the healthiest foods that one can opt for. Even olive oil is known for its wide range of health and beauty benefits. Hence, all in all, this is one fruit that is packed with goodness for the body. The health benefits of olives are numerous. They help eliminate excess cholesterol in the blood, control blood pressure and are a good source of dietary fibres as an alternative for fruits and vegetables. Olives are the greatest sources of vitamin E. This vitamin acts as an antioxidant and protects the cells from free radical damage. Regular consumption of olives reduces the effect of degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and benign diseases. Olives prevent blood clots that can lead to further diseases. They also protect the cell membrane from cancer. Likewise, there are various benefits of consuming olives. Therefore, in this article, we at Boldsky will be listing out some of benefits of consuming olives on a regular basis. Read on to know more about it.

For Cardiovascular Health: Olives have a diverse range of antioxidants that protect the cells from oxidative stress. The antioxidants in them protect the cardiovascular health by neutralising free radicals. The monounsaturated fatty acids present in olives are good for reducing the risk of cardiac diseases.

Cancer Prevention: Olives lower the risk of cancer by providing a rich supply of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. They lower the risk of breast cancer and its re-occurrence.

waist-22-1450760664Weight Loss: Olives assist in weight loss too. Their monounsaturated fatty acids help in weight loss and weight management. According to a research conducted, a diet rich in olives is beneficial in reducing weight.

Digestive Health: Maslinic acid and triterpenoid compound present in the olive skin help fight cancer cells. This acid hampers the growth of colon cancer cells. Since olives are a good source of fibre, they promote the digestion process.
: Olives are a rich source of iron, an essential mineral component of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin carries oxygen from the lungs and transports it throughout the body.

(Source: http://www.boldsky.com)

Cheese-Stuffed Olives

Preparation

Mix goat cheese, Parmesan, herbs, garlic, and lemon juice in a small bowl; season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a small round tip (or use a resealable plastic bag and snip one corner of bag open with scissors). Pipe mixture into olives.
Place olives, thyme sprigs, chiles, and lemon zest in a shallow dish and pour oil over top.

Do Ahead

Olives can be marinated 4 days ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before serving.
Recipe by Rita Sodi & Jody Williams
Photograph by Eva Kolenko

Thanksgiving salad

NANA’S ORANGE, FENNEL AND OLIVE SALAD WITH MARINATED FETA

thanksgiving salad tll 1109MARINATED FETA:
1 pound block feta cheese
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup roughly chopped or torn fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon black pepper 

SALAD:
2 cups sliced fennel (halved lengthwise, cored and thinly sliced lengthwise with a sharp knife)
3/4 cup chopped feathery fennel fronds
1 3/4 cups pitted whole Italian oiled-cured black olives (substitute Kalamata if desired)
8 navel oranges, divided use
6 blood oranges or ruby red grapefruit
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Continue reading

Nutrition News: Super-Healthy Olives

HE_green-olives-thinkstock_s4x3.jpg.rend.sni18col

Feel Good About Olives

Are olives a food you can feel good about eating? A panel of nutritionists and diet experts polled by Time magazine all say olives make a very healthy snack indeed. They point out that about four large olives have only about 20 calories, are nutritionally rich and contain about two grams of healthy monounsaturated fat, which benefits your heart, your brain and your belly. What’s more, olives are packed with antioxidants like biophenols, which keep bad cholesterol from building up in your artery walls. They’re also anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial, and aid in disease prevention. Plus, as a fermented food, they offer gut-friendly bacteria. One drawback: Because they are cured, olives may be high in salt, so the experts suggest you compensate by cutting out another salty snack. A small price to pay …

(Source: http://blog.foodnetwork.com)

Oliven: So gesund sind die Öl-Früchte

Sie sind ein leckerer Snack und nebenbei ein natürliches Schmerzmittel: Oliven. Was die mediterrane Köstlichkeit in unserem Körper bewirkt, lesen Sie hier.

Sättigende Ballaststoffe, viele gesunde Fettsäuren und eine natürliche Schmerzarznei: All das steckt in Oliven.

Sättigende Ballaststoffe, viele gesunde Fettsäuren und eine natürliche Schmerzarznei: All das steckt in Oliven.

Olivenöl gilt schon lange als Gesundheitselixier. In der Ernährung schützt es Herz und Kreislauf, in der Kosmetik sorgt es für gesunde Haut. Aber wussten Sie schon, wie vielseitig die Olive uns tatsächlich schützt?

Für ein langes Leben: Oliven sind reich an Vitamin E und sekundären Pflanzenstoffen, die die Zellen schützen. Das beugt nicht nur Krebs  vor, sondern hält Geist und Körper zusätzlich bis ins hohe Alter jung und fit.

Natürliches Schmerzmittel: Britische Forscher haben herausgefunden, dass frisch gepresstes Olivenöl ähnlich wirkt wie der Schmerzmittel-­Inhaltsstoff Ibuprofen. Es aktiviert ein Enzym, das Entzündungen hemmt.

Ob grün oder schwarz: Oliven sind kalorienarm und machen gesund

Gegen Depressionen: Hochwertiges Olivenöl senkt dank der enthaltenen ungesättigten Fettsäuren erwiesenermaßen das Risiko, an einer Depression zu erkranken.

Grün oder Schwarz? Schwarze Oliven liefern mehr sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe. Grüne enthalten mehr Wasser und sind kalorienärmer. Doch Vorsicht: Viele vermeintlich schwarze Oliven sind in Wahrheit gefärbte grüne. Dann steht “geschwärzt” auf der Verpackung.

Übrigens: 100 Gramm Oliven enthalten rund 115 Kilokalorien (kcal). Das ist weniger als ein Viertel dessen, was in der gleichen Menge Kartoffelchips steckt!

Mehr lesen: http://www.lifeline.de

“Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip” by Two Moms in the Raw

The two moms behind the name – Shari Koolik Leidich and Marsha Koolik – joined 9NEWS on Monday to share three recipes you can find in their new cookbook:

Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip

2moms-our-story-largeSandwich spread? Dip? You get to choose! You’ll never find me without a few jars of artichoke hearts in the house, and this dip is the number-one reason why. In five minutes, you’ve got an appetizer that tastes so creamy, you’d swear it’s really fattening or loaded with yogurt or mayo – or both. Neither could be further from the truth! Add to that the nutritional advantages: Artichokes are near the top of the USDA’s list of antioxidant-rich foods, and they also contain fiber, folate, and vitamins C and K. So dip, dip, dip away to your heart’s content. (Makes 2 cups)

Ingredients

  • 2 (14-ounce) jars water-packed artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup pitted green olives, preferably Castelvetrano variety
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

Directions

  1. In a blender, pulse the artichokes, water, oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper until chunky-smooth, 10-15 pulses.
  2. Add the olives and oregano and pulse until slightly smoothed out, 5 to 10 pulses.
  3. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for 2 to 3 days.

(Source: http://www.9news.com)

Flavonoids: Are you eating enough berries and onions for healthy aging?

LESLIE BECK – Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014, 2:52 PM EST

If oranges, apples, berries and onions – foods rich in flavonoids – aren’t part of your regular diet, consider adding them to your menu. According to researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, doing so will help you remain healthy, mentally sharp and physically active when you’re older. For women, at least.

he-aging-cranberries03lf1Flavonoids are bioactive compounds found in fruits, vegetables, legumes, tea, chocolate and red wine. The 4,000-plus different flavonoids found in foods can be divided into subclasses; those we most commonly consume include anthocyanins, flavonols, flavones and flavanones.

The many benefits attributed to a flavonoid-rich diet include a lower risk of stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and certain cancers as well as better cognitive performance.

For the study, published last week in the online version of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers set out to determine if women who consumed plenty of flavonoids in their 50s maintained good health and well-being in their 70s. Among 13,818 women, those who consumed the most – versus the least – flavonoids at midlife had significantly greater odds of being a “healthy ager,” even after accounting for diet quality, physical activity, smoking, education and family history.

Women were considered healthy agers if, at aged 70 or older, they were free of major chronic diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, kidney failure, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis) and had no cognitive impairment, physical disabilities or mental-health problems. The remaining women were classified as “usual agers.”

When it came to food sources of flavonoids, a regular intake of oranges and onions (at least five servings a week versus less than one per month) was linked to a greater likelihood of healthy aging. Eating berries at least twice a week compared with less than once was also protective.

As powerful antioxidants, flavonoids do their work in the body by preventing damage caused by free radicals, unstable molecules that can harm cells. Cumulative free radical damage is implicated in aging, memory decline, depression and many chronic diseases.

Flavonoids also decrease inflammation, relax blood vessels and help prevent blood clots that could lead to heart attack or stroke. As well, flavonoids have been shown to activate the brain’s natural house-cleaning process, helping remove toxins and other compounds that can interfere with cognitive function.

A flavonoid-rich diet may help you live more healthily as you age, but other foods are important, too. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, the best sources of antioxidants, has consistently been tied to good health. While many fruits and vegetables deliver flavonoids, many are also excellent sources of other antioxidants such as vitamins C and E and beta-carotene.

Include 7 to 10 servings (combined) in your daily diet. One serving is equivalent to one medium-sized fruit, ½ cup chopped fruit or berries, ¼ cup dried fruit (unsweetened), ½ cup of cooked or raw vegetables, one cup of salad greens or ½ cup of 100-per-cent vegetable or fruit juice. (Limit intake of fruit juice to one serving a day.)

Oily fish, flax and chia seeds, avocado, walnuts, pecans, cashews hazelnuts, olives and olive oil contain healthy fats that dampen inflammation, a major contributor to age-related disease.

Continue reading

How to choose a good table olive

Featured-Image1Learn these important points on how to choose a good table olive

Olives are one of those unique foods that don’t only taste delicious, but also offer many health benefits. It is however important to learn how to choose a good table olive, since they vary extensively in appearance, flavour and texture.

We asked the South African Olive Industry Association how to choose a good table olive. Here are a few pointers:

How to choose a good olive1. Looks
The first characteristic to take important notice of is of course the appearance of the olive. The olive must always looks physically appealing and it must make you want to eat it immediately. Physical defects are not good.

2. Aroma
Next important point is smell. A good olive will always smell great. The aroma will give a good indication of how the processing was managed as most of the volatile components are a result of the fermentation process. If not fermented, the aroma is usually that of the added ingredients, like garlic, herbs and various other flavourings. An off-fermentation will be noticeable on the nose, and any off-odour is totally unacceptable in quality table olives.

3. Taste
Right so now we get to the taste. As with anything, taste and flavour are very subjective, so we always suggest that newbies to olives start with a blander product, just like they start new wine drinkers with a sweeter wine. Once hooked on these little delicacies, then move onto products with more flavour, the natural olive flavour in particular. A fully fermented table olive should display a balance between the natural flavour of the fruit, the natural lactic acid and the added salt and vinegar.

4. Texture
A good table olive should have a degree of firmness in the flesh, without being tough or woody. The skin should not be too tough and the flesh should detach from the pit quite easily. The texture is determined by many factors, but most importantly is when the olives are harvested and cultivated. The methods of processing play an important role, which can either maintain the texture of the olive or compromise it.

5. Final tip
It’s important to experience as many different styles and flavours as possible and in so doing, build up a profile of the olives you like.

For more information please visit www.saolive.co.za or find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/SaOliveIndustryAssociation 

How AGE affects our taste in food: We only start liking olives, anchovies and blue cheese in our twenties, survey reveals

Survey: People are 22 on average before they enjoy strong-tasting foods
People start tolerating garlic at 19 but are 28 before they eat goats cheese
Previous research explains we lose taste buds as we get older, meaning we can tolerate stronger and complex tasting food

Sophisticated adults love to dine on olives, blue cheese and anchovies – but many hated these foods as a child. Now, experts have discovered the ‘gastronomic watershed’ – the age at which we start to like ‘grown-up foods’. A survey discovered the average person is aged 22 when they start to appreciate more complex, stronger flavours like goats cheese, chilli sauce and avocado. The research identified 20 foods we are unlikely to enjoy until we hit our late teens and early 20s.

bluecheese

olives stuffed

garlicanchovies

The average person is aged 22 when they start to appreciate more complex, stronger flavours like goats cheese, olives and anchovies, a survey has revealed.

Previously, scientists have theorised our changing tastes are due to how the number of taste buds in our mouths declines with age. Babies are born with innate cravings for sweet things, as our mother’s milk is packed with sugar and fat. Infants have around 30,000 tastebuds in their mouths, so strong tastes will be much more intense for a child. This explains why nursery food is so bland and why children might find strong tasting foods overpowering. By the time we become adults, only a third of these taste buds remain, mostly on our tongues. This explains why we can then tolerate and enjoy stronger tastes.  According the survey, many of us find it difficult to appreciate the taste of strong tasting fish like mackerel during childhood and even throughout our teen years. And mature cheeses fared no better, with most people aged 21 before they appreciated parmesan and aged 22 before they liked to eat blue cheese. Similarly, most people didn’t appreciate a spicy curry until their late teens. Unsurprisingly a host of vegetables featured high up on the list, with spinach and peppers both beginning to appeal to our taste buds at the age of 21. Chilli sauce, gherkins, garlic and horseradish sauce featured in the list of 20 ‘grown-up’ foods, as did kidney beans. But goats cheese proved to be the most disliked childhood flavour, with the average person not fully appreciating it until they hit 28. Other flavours that failed to please our palate during our younger years were olives, which we only begin to enjoy at the ripe old age of 25, and oysters, a taste we acquire at 24. The survey asked 1,950 British adults about which foods they hated as a child but now find delicious.

Overall the stats show that despite the majority of us finally embracing the full range of tastes and flavours by the time we reach our 20s, there are likely to still be two foods on average we still refuse to eat as adults. The research also revealed that school meals play a major part in helping us form early opinions of foods and tastes we then form an opinion of through life. The data showed one in three adults has eaten food they didn’t like for fear of upsetting the host. More than one in ten have done so during a meal at the in-laws, while business lunches and dinners with friends or close family have also led to people having to ‘grin and bear it’. The most common situation in which we begin to enjoy a food we disliked in the past is during meals with friends. Trying new foods on holiday and meeting someone who has a broader knowledge of foods and flavours were also given as reasons. Nutritional Therapist Karen Poole explained: ‘Our relationship with food develops at a very early age and can affect how we eat and what we eat throughout our lifetime. ‘Our tastebuds are the initial way we learn to recognise food as either friend or foe and bitter or strong foods can often be a warning to leave well alone, and later on determine what we like and what we are happy to avoid. ‘Biologically, as we age, the rate of renewal and regeneration of our tastebuds slows down and the overall number is reduced and this may also influence our reaction to certain foods and make stronger tastes more interesting and enjoyable. ‘Its natural as we grow up to broaden our horizons across many fields so there are many external factors also that contribute to people becoming more adventurous at these particular ages’. The survey was carried out by Butterkist.

(Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk)