Secrets of One of the World’s Healthiest Villages

Pioppi, Italy is known as the world’s healthiest village because many of its residents live past the age of 100. What are the factors responsible for their remarkable longevity? A leading doctor in Britain revealed their secrets.

The villagers have a diet of whole natural foods comprised of things that are in season and available according to the local climate.– Kathy Gruver

Imagine living in a community where the average man lives to be 89 and many reach the 100-year mark. Picture what it would be like to enjoy one’s golden years without dementia or type 2 diabetes, maladies that are an integral part of aging in the rest of the world. After hearing about Pioppi, cardiologist Aseem Malhotra became fascinated with discovering what diet kept the residents so healthy and what lessons could be learned from them.

After studying the village, Malhotra developed a formula for optimal health. For starters, the Pioppians have a very low sugar intake, eating it only once per week. It is this dietary practice that the doctor considers essential for their good health. He contends that western society’s fear of fat is to blame for the high consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Malhotra attributes these foods as the cause of the widespread incidence of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.


Pioppi has received notoriety because it’s known as the home of the Mediterranean diet. As the villagers have no supermarket, their diet consists largely of vegetables, olive oil and fish. They also eat cheese, but other dairy products aren’t available. Pasta and bread are consumed in small quantities. In addition to sugar, their diet is low in meat and refined carbohydrates.

Other lifestyle practices aside from a healthful diet play a role. The villagers get seven hours of sleep per night and experience freedom from much stress. Although it isn’t intentional, intermittent fasting is a natural part of their lives. They don’t engage in exercise per se, but they’re very active.

Malhotra is the coauthor of a new book, The Pioppi Diet: A 21-Day Lifestyle Plan. Below are his top recommendations for vibrant health and longevity based on the Pioppians:

• Don’t fear fat; sugar and refined carbs are the enemies.
• Keep moving. Exercise for health, not weight loss (and walking is best).
• Extra virgin olive oil is medicine, as is a small handful of nuts – eat both, every day.
• Get seven hours of sleep a night.
• Stop counting calories because not all are created equal.
• Eat 10 eggs a week. They’re satiating and full of protein.
• Have two portions of vegetables in at least two meals a day.
• Fast once a week for 24 hours. Have dinner, then don’t have breakfast or lunch the next day.

While Malhotra is an allopathic doctor, his advisories are in line with tenets of naturopathic medicine. Olive Oil Times sought out the perspective of Kathy Gruver, natural health author, speaker and practitioner. “I think there are several points to this that we can all adopt. The villagers have a diet of whole natural foods comprised of things that are in season and available according to the local climate,” she said.

“This is unlike the western diet that involves a huge amount of processed and packaged foods. It’s not only laden with sugar but also contains fake and unhealthful components such as high fructose corn syrup, MSG, artificial sweeteners, additives, preservatives and fast food. Our bodies weren’t made to process all this fake stuff. It doesn’t know what to do with it,” Gruver added.

“Furthermore, he mentions though they don’t ‘exercise,’ they are very active. We put so much emphasis on workouts, which can be a big turn-off to people. They think it means that they have to go to the gym or run on a treadmill. But it’s about moving your body in a way that works for you.”

“I laud the doctor’s suggestions on sleep, stress and intermittent fasting as well. All of these things, clearly, are combining to promote optimal health and a longer life.”

VILLAGERS IN NORTHERN CRETE HAVE LOW RATES OF HEART DISEASE DESPITE FATTY DIET

People living in isolated Greek mountains villages live long and healthy lives thanks to a unique gene that protects them against heart disease, recent research has found.

Scientists studied the villagers in an area of northern Crete because they had low cases of heart disease despite eating lots of animal fats.

The study, for the first time made a genetic portrait of the population of of Zoniana and Anogia by sequencing the entire genome of 250 individuals.

They found a new genetic variant, common among villagers, which appears to protect the heart by lowering levels of ‘bad’ fats and cholesterol.

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute found that the variant is 40 times more common in this small Greek population than in other European populations.

Lead author Professor Eleftheria Zeggini said: ‘Genetic studies like this can help us begin to understand why this is.’

(Sources: https://www.oliveoiltimes.com, http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

Olive production down 30%

Production of olives for olive oil in Portugal is expected to have fallen by 30 percent in 2016 to less than 500,000 tonnes, and the autumn/winter grain growing area to have fallen to an “all-time low” according to projections from the National Statistics Institute.

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According to INE, the drop in olive production for oil was the result of “adverse weather and the annual production rotation of traditional olive groves,” and expects total production of about 491,000 tonnes
(-30 percent against 2015), but “good quality” olive oil.
As for autumn/winter grains there was a “general reduction of installed areas,” compared to the previous year due to periods of intense cold and a lack of rain.
INE’s projections point to drops of around 5 percent in rye area, 10 percent in common wheat, triticale and barley and of 15 percent for durum wheat, with a total grain area of around 130,000 hectares, “which is the lowest recorded in the last three decades, in a year in which weather conditions made it possible for planting to go ahead as normal.”

(Source: http://theportugalnews.com)

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Cook to Get Cut: 5 Nutritious Recipes Using Olives

Healthy Open-Face Breakfast Sandwiches

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Avocado sandwich with arugula, seeds and poached egg

Most breakfast sandwiches include a combination of eggs, bacon, and cheese. This triple threat always tastes delicious, but it’s not the healthiest way to start your day. Instead of topping your breakfast with a mound of smoked pork, try olives with this Mediterranean-inspired sandwich from Chowhound. They add just as much flavor without requiring any additional cooking, which means this sandwich is pretty speedy.

As for the specifics, olives contain 65 calories per ounce compared to bacon’s 149 calories for the same amount, making them a great way to lighten up this breakfast classic. And even though they’re loaded with the salty taste most of us love, olives still contain less sodium per ounce than bacon.

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 slices spelt or other bread
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1½ cups baby kale or spinach
  • ¼ cup pitted kalamata olives, sliced
  • ½ avocado, sliced into four pieces
  • ⅓ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • Salt and pepper

Directions: Heat olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add eggs and begin to cook. Meanwhile toast bread under the broiler or with a toaster. Cook eggs to your desired doneness, spooning some of the oil over the tops of the whites to help them cook. Remove eggs to a plate.

Increase skillet heat to high and add red pepper flakes. Stir in kale and cook, tossing, until just wilted, about 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in olives.

Top each slice of toast with an equal amount of greens. Add an egg to each, then top with avocado, feta, and a sprinkle each of salt and pepper. Serve.

(Source: http://www.cheatsheet.com)

Amazing Health Benefits Of Olives

Written by: Bindu Published: Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 2:01 [IST]
olivesforovaries-15-1455537537Olives are one of the most widely enjoyed foods across the globe. Olives are the fruits that come in a wide range of varieties. They are bitter in taste and are highly used in the preparation of salads. Olives are one of the healthiest foods that one can opt for. Even olive oil is known for its wide range of health and beauty benefits. Hence, all in all, this is one fruit that is packed with goodness for the body. The health benefits of olives are numerous. They help eliminate excess cholesterol in the blood, control blood pressure and are a good source of dietary fibres as an alternative for fruits and vegetables. Olives are the greatest sources of vitamin E. This vitamin acts as an antioxidant and protects the cells from free radical damage. Regular consumption of olives reduces the effect of degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and benign diseases. Olives prevent blood clots that can lead to further diseases. They also protect the cell membrane from cancer. Likewise, there are various benefits of consuming olives. Therefore, in this article, we at Boldsky will be listing out some of benefits of consuming olives on a regular basis. Read on to know more about it.

For Cardiovascular Health: Olives have a diverse range of antioxidants that protect the cells from oxidative stress. The antioxidants in them protect the cardiovascular health by neutralising free radicals. The monounsaturated fatty acids present in olives are good for reducing the risk of cardiac diseases.

Cancer Prevention: Olives lower the risk of cancer by providing a rich supply of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. They lower the risk of breast cancer and its re-occurrence.

waist-22-1450760664Weight Loss: Olives assist in weight loss too. Their monounsaturated fatty acids help in weight loss and weight management. According to a research conducted, a diet rich in olives is beneficial in reducing weight.

Digestive Health: Maslinic acid and triterpenoid compound present in the olive skin help fight cancer cells. This acid hampers the growth of colon cancer cells. Since olives are a good source of fibre, they promote the digestion process.
: Olives are a rich source of iron, an essential mineral component of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin carries oxygen from the lungs and transports it throughout the body.

(Source: http://www.boldsky.com)

Cheese-Stuffed Olives

Preparation

Mix goat cheese, Parmesan, herbs, garlic, and lemon juice in a small bowl; season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a small round tip (or use a resealable plastic bag and snip one corner of bag open with scissors). Pipe mixture into olives.
Place olives, thyme sprigs, chiles, and lemon zest in a shallow dish and pour oil over top.

Do Ahead

Olives can be marinated 4 days ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before serving.
Recipe by Rita Sodi & Jody Williams
Photograph by Eva Kolenko

“Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip” by Two Moms in the Raw

The two moms behind the name – Shari Koolik Leidich and Marsha Koolik – joined 9NEWS on Monday to share three recipes you can find in their new cookbook:

Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip

2moms-our-story-largeSandwich spread? Dip? You get to choose! You’ll never find me without a few jars of artichoke hearts in the house, and this dip is the number-one reason why. In five minutes, you’ve got an appetizer that tastes so creamy, you’d swear it’s really fattening or loaded with yogurt or mayo – or both. Neither could be further from the truth! Add to that the nutritional advantages: Artichokes are near the top of the USDA’s list of antioxidant-rich foods, and they also contain fiber, folate, and vitamins C and K. So dip, dip, dip away to your heart’s content. (Makes 2 cups)

Ingredients

  • 2 (14-ounce) jars water-packed artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup pitted green olives, preferably Castelvetrano variety
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

Directions

  1. In a blender, pulse the artichokes, water, oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper until chunky-smooth, 10-15 pulses.
  2. Add the olives and oregano and pulse until slightly smoothed out, 5 to 10 pulses.
  3. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for 2 to 3 days.

(Source: http://www.9news.com)

Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour

Bonnie Stern | January 16, 2015 | Last Updated: Jan 16 3:52 PM ET

SICILIAN CAPONATA
This Sicilian cooked vegetable salad gets its flavour from the combination of vegetables and the sweet and sour mixture of sugar amd vinegar. We learned a version of this at Maria Grammatico’s La Scuola de Cucina in Trapani. Serve as a salad, a side dish or a sauce for pasta.

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Peter J. Thompson/National Post Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour.

-1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil or more
-2 lbs round Sicilian eggplants, or regular eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes with skin
-4 ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
-16 cippoline onions, peeled and halved or quartered
-1 cup puréed San Marzano tomatoes (freeze the rest and use in soups or sauces)
-1/2 cup each black and green olives, pitted
-2 tbsp capers, rinsed
-2 tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar
-2 tbsp sugar
-kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
-1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1. Heat oil in a large deep skillet on medium-high. Add eggplant, in batches if necessary, and cook 10 to 15 minutes until browned. Remove eggplant to a large bowl. Add more oil to the pan if necessary.
2. Add celery to pan and cook 5 to 6 minutes until partially tender and golden brown. Add to the eggplant.
3. Add onions to pan and cook 10 to 15 minutes until tender and browned. Add celery and eggplant back to pan along with tomato purée, black and green olives and capers. Add 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Cook gently 10 minutes.
4. Bring vinegar and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan. Stir into vegetables. Cook a few minutes.
5. Add parsley and cool. Season to taste. Serve at room temperature.
Makes approximately 6 cups

(Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/16/bonnie-stern-my-souvenirs-of-sicily-include-these-six-savoury-and-sweet-recipes-i-brought-home/)

Olives can enliven a host of dishes

A Bit of Mediterranean Lifestyle Could Help You Live Longer

mediterranean-diet

As if we didn’t already know that life on the Mediterranean is much better for our health, than the hectic city life and fast food of metropolises, it turns out that new research published this week in the British Medical Journal reveals that a Mediterranean Diet is amongst the healthiest out there. But while you may imagine strolls on the beach and kilos of gelato to take home, like many trips to Italy undoubtedly have, the diet that Harvard researchers investigated for the study was the trademark diet known of the Mediterranean – rich in olive oils, fish, vegetables, legumes and low in sugar. With a little added touch; a glass of wine traditional with every meal. And what the researchers found is that women who follow the strictly healthy fat diet have significantly longer life spans than women who don’t have a healthy diet – keeping them younger and in better health for years more than the global average.

Studying nutritional data from 4,676 participating in the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study, the research team was able to determine which individuals’ diets were the healthiest. And what they found was that women whose dietary habits hewed significant similarities with a Mediterranean diet had elongated telomeres at the ends of their DNA, giving them longer cellular life-spans and healthier skin as a trade-off.

“We know that having shorter telomeres is associated with a lower life expectancy and a greater risk of cancer, heart disease, and other diseases” study coauthor from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Immaculata De Vivo says. “Certain lifestyle factors like obesity, sugary sodas, and smoking have been found to accelerate telomere shortening.”

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Quick Pasta with Shrimp, Green Olive, Orange and Baby Arugula

Ingredients:
IMG_41642-560x840For the Vinaigrette:
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
1/4 cup orange juice (about the juice of 1 orange)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper

For the Pasta:
1 pound pasta of choice
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1 shallot, peeled and diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 pound pasta of choice

For Assembly:
7 ounces pitted green olives, drained
4 ounces baby arugula
2 oranges, segmented

Directions:
Tip to allow this meal to come together quickly and seamlessly: Prep everything in advance/while water is coming to a boil (garlic minced, shallots chopped, vinaigrette made, and pasta ingredients in large bowl – arugula, segmented oranges, and olives). Once the water is boiling, add your pasta and then immediately begin cooking the shrimp portion. The shrimp cooks quickly so everything should finish up right around the same time so you can just toss and serve!

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For the Vinaigrette:
Add all ingredients to a glass measuring cup (or other container) and whisk until well combined. Set aside until ready to use.

For the Pasta:
In a large pot, bring salted (always add a teaspoon or 2 of salt to your pasta water!) water to a boil over high heat. Cook pasta according to package instructions, stirring occasionally, drain when cooked to tender but firm.

While pasta is cooking, heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the chopped shallots and garlic and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes. Season the shrimp with salt and pepper and add to the pan and stir until mixed in with the shallots and garlic. Add white wine to the pan and saute for 2 to 3 minutes (until the shrimp are pink and cooked through).

To Assemble:
Add cooked pasta & shrimp to a large bowl and add the baby arugula, orange segments, olives, and vinaigrette. Gently toss to combine and allow arugula to start to wilt. Portion into pasta bowls and serve with a tiny pinch of sea salt on top. Serve immediately.

(Source: http://www.mylifeasamrs.com/)

Linguine with swordfish and olives

INGREDIENTS

16bb593f992107536b77302246b8185b2295073263-1409814400-54080f80-360x2511 large onion, chopped
120ml extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, crushed
5g chilli, chopped
60g green olives
200g fresh swordfish, diced
½ glass white wine
12 cherry tomatoes
4 tbsps chopped basil
2 tbsps chopped parsley
2 tbsps chopped coriander
400g linguine

METHOD

Sauté the onion slices in a frying pan with a little extra virgin olive oil until these turn slightly soft. Add the garlic, chilli, olives and the swordfish and sauté for one minute. Then add the white wine and cook until all the wine is absorbed. Add the cherry tomatoes, half the basil, parsley and coriander and allow to simmer for five minutes.

Cook the pasta in boiling water. Take a tablespoon of the pasta water and add it to the sauce, add a pinch of salt and cover. Drain the pasta and transfer to the pan over low heat.

Mix the pasta in the sauce and simmer for a few minutes. Add more fresh herbs, but keep some aside to garnish.

Serve the pasta on warm plates, garnish with the remaining herbs and drizzle some herb oil.

Joe Vella is an Executive chef, Hilton Malta.

(Source: http://www.timesofmalta.com)

Olive LEAF may be the key to heart health, say experts, as drink using the ingredient launches in Britain

 

By JENNY HOPE FOR THE DAILY MAIL (

1408747913221_Image_galleryImage_OVIVO_Organic_Olive_Leaf_Forget the health benefits of olives and olive oil – the latest boost to wellbeing is the humble olive leaf. It was once a folk remedy revered by the Greeks, while ancient Egyptians used it for mummifying royalty. But a drink made from olive leaf extract – taken from freshly picked Italian organic olive leaves – is the first health supplement of its kind to be launched in Britain. A new scientific review in the journal Complete Nutrition shows it contains two antioxidant compounds known to support heart health that are among the most potent yet discovered.

Oleuropein, a polyphenol produced by the olive tree, makes it particularly robust and resistant against insect and bacterial damage. The other compound hydroxytyrosol, is thought to be a major ingredient of virgin olive oil – one of the cornerstones of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet. Although it is found in olives and olive oil, the highest concentrations occur in the leaf. The 5mg dose contained in a serving of Ovivo Organic Leaf Infusion with Calendula has been approved by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) as having antioxidant activity. Dr Pamela Mason, chair of the Government’s Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances, suggests the combination of hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein may hold the key to many of the health benefits associated with olives and the Mediterranean diet.

1408747712211_wps_1_A_stock_photo_of_a_small_

Both have powerful antioxidant activity and have been shown to reduce the oxidation of ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol – the process that makes it hazardous to health. A study found a twice-a-day 500mg dose of olive extract was as effective as an ACE inhibitor at reducing both diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Unlike the prescription-only blood pressure pill, the extract also significantly lowered levels of triglycerides, blood fats linked to heart problems. Another trial investigating the impact of olive leaf extract on blood sugar control reported a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity after just 12 weeks. The review also included a study in patients with type 2 diabetes which showed improved insulin levels and lower levels of a marker linked to a greater risk of diabetes-related complications. The review concludes: ‘This extremely promising ingredient, olive leaf, is worthy of considerable further research.’

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A tapas party for end of summer

Tapas and small bites make a refreshing, relaxing summer meal, such as the above “Pintxos”, or skewered bites with a mix of ingredients such as olives, cheeses, and meats.

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Gilda Pintxos

6 medium cured guindillas (see note, recipe)

12 large green Spanish olives, cured, marinated

6 cured cornichons

6 cured cebollitas

6 cured anchovy fillets

Arrange 1 guindilla, 2 olives, 1 cornichon, 1 cebollita and 1 anchovy on each wooden skewer. Serve on baguette slices or, if you want the pintxos to stand up, skewer the cebollitas last for stability.

Note: You can use Italian pepperoncini, for example, instead of guindillas, small Basque pickled peppers.

Makes 6

(Source: http://www.providencejournal.com)

Marcona almonds, Padron peppers, Jamon Iberico and chorizo are staples of a Spanish food spread.

tapas

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The Olive Method, a money-saving strategy

What’s your olive?

This Simple Question Could Save You Money On Every Shopping Trip.

Over on personal finance blog Vosa, founder Brent recently presented a money-saving strategy he’s named “The Olive Method,” after the example of American Airlines eliminating the mostly uneaten olives from their customers’ salads and saving hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

What do in-flight meals have to do with saving you money while you shop?

Well, Brent explains, choosing your “olive” just means eliminating the item in your basket or cart you want least, just like you might not choose to eat the olive. If you aren’t going to eat and enjoy it, why buy it? Pass it up and save the cash instead.

olive almond and garlicHere are a few examples of more widely applicable olives, based on the guidelines provided on Vosa:

– When clothes shopping, the duplicate “It’s such a good deal” white tee

– When food shopping, the “I had a hard week” cookies

– When at the drugstore, the “Let me just grab this” candy bar

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Table Olive Processing (Method 1)

fermentationThis method is similar to the natural fermentation process we use. It allows the sugars in the olives to ferment and form lactic acid. The end result will be well worth the effort and the wait. All the wonderful flavours are preserved and this gives the olives its delicious taste.

 Green Olives:

  • Green olives are soaked in a caustic soda solution of between 1,3 and 2,6% for ±15 hours. The time may vary according to the size and ripeness of the fruit. After a few hours, take out an olive and make a cut through the flesh. When the lye has penetrated two thirds of the distance between the surface of the fruit and the pit, it is ready to be washed.
  • Also try to prevent the olives from coming into contact with air, as this can cause the colour to go dark or an unattractive khaki green. Keep in an airtight container (stainless steel, glass or high grade plastic will not affect the taste) through the entire process.
  • In the mean time prepare the brine by dissolving 1 kilogram of salt in 10 litres of clean water.
  • Now rinse the olives many times with clean, cold water to remove soapiness and caustic residue. This step is very important, because you don’t want your olives to taste of caustic soda or “soapy”.
  • Place the olives into a suitable container and cover completely with the brine. Make sure the container has a tight fitting lid.
  • Leave to ferment ±12 months. Taste them from time to time and decide for yourself when they are to your taste.

Bottling: Remove from the brine, rinse with clean water and place into glass jars and cover with hot brine. To make the brine solution: 20g Salt mixed into 1 liter boiling water. Cover immediately and leave to cool. Store in a cool place and refrigerate after opening.  Wine vinegar may be added to taste. You may even add sprigs of fresh herbs like rosemary or thyme or a few cloves of garlic or lemon slices.

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Orzo salad with Kalamata olives, dried cranberries, and walnuts

Serves 6

Margie Coloian, of Johnston, R.I., sent an orzo salad to The Recipe Box Project, in which readers send in their favorite family dishes. This uses just a few tablespoons of light vinaigrette dressing, which is tossed with orzo, the flat rice-shaped pasta, Kalamata olives, dried cranberries, toasted walnuts, red onion, and tomato. “The dish balances the saltiness of olives with the sweetness of cranberries,” writes Coloian. Add feta cheese crumbles to make the dish richer.

OrzoIMG_2601croppedDRESSING

2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar | Salt and pepper, to taste | 1 clove garlic, smashed | 1 tablespoon olive oil

1. In a small bowl whisk together the vinegar, salt, and pepper.

2. Whisk in the oil. Add the garlic. Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like.

SALAD

1/2 cup walnuts | Salt and pepper, to taste | 1 cup orzo | 1/2 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped | 1 large tomato, coarsely chopped | 1/4 red onion finely chopped | 1/2 cup Kalamata olives, chopped | 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley | 1/2 cup dried cranberries | 1/2 cup crumbled feta chees (opt) | Olive oil (for sprinkling)

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Olive Oil, Honey Could Help Lift Greece Out of Recession

iFM0QgSNILGoGreek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras is calling on manufacturers of traditional foods and beverages, from fish-roe producers to honey makers, to play a bigger role in transforming the country into an export economy.

Greece, which saw exports fall 0.2 percent to 27.3 billion euros ($37.5 billion) in 2013, needs food and beverage companies to catch up with export-oriented industries like fuels and do more to help pull the country out of a six-year recession, Samaras told industry representatives on the island of Lesvos May 13.

More Greek food companies, some of whom were forced to look for sales outside their traditional home market as the crisis shrank the economy, should focus “on processing agricultural produce in order to bring Greek products to international markets,” Samaras said. “Today, 200 large companies account for 85 percent of production while 17,000 small and medium-sized companies have huge potential.”

elies-agrotesGreek exports of agricultural products including food, beverages and vegetable oils rose 3.5 percent by value in 2013 to 4.75 billion euros, according to the Panhellenic Exporters Association. At around 17 percent of the total value of Greek exports, the food and beverage industry trails fuels and industrial goods like machinery and chemical products as the country’s top export category.

Greece’s economy contracted at its slowest pace in four years in the first quarter, the Hellenic Statistical Authority said May 15. The European Commission forecasts that Greek GDP will grow 0.6 percent this year, its first annual expansion since 2007.

(Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/)

Green olive, basil, and almond tapenade

Green olive, basil, and almond tapenade2 Credit - Ed Anderson, 2014.jpgIngredients: Serves 6 to 8

260g green olives, pitted (Inolivia with almonds)
35g whole untoasted almonds
1 small clove garlic, peeled and minced
1 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and squeezed dry
15g fresh basil leaves
125ml olive oil
Sea salt or kosher salt

Method Step 1: Put the olives, almonds, garlic, lemon juice, and capers in the bowl of a food processor. (I don’t use a mortar and pestle for this because I like the slightly chunky bits of almonds in the finished tapenade.)

Step 2: Coarsely chop the basil leaves, add them to the processor, and pulse the machine a few times to start breaking them down.

Step 3: Add the olive oil and a sprinkle of salt. Pulse the food processor until the mixture forms a coarse paste, one that still has a little texture provided by the not-entirely-broken-down almonds. The tapenade will keep for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

From My Paris Kitchen by David Lebovitz. (http://metro.co.uk/)