Tuna and Olive Pasta Salad

Tuna-Olive-Pasta-Salad-XL

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces (1/2 box) whole-wheat penne pasta
  • 1/4 cup store-bought pesto
  • 1 (6-ounce) can oil-packed tuna, drained
  • 1/4 cup pitted Kalamata olives

Preparation

1. Cook pasta according to package directions in salted water; reserve 1/4 cup pasta water. Drain pasta, run under cold water, and return to pot.

2. In a bowl, whisk together pesto and 2 tablespoons reserved pasta water; toss with pasta, tuna, olives, and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper in pot. Chill, if desired; serve.

(Source: http://www.health.com)

Steak with feisty green olive tapenade and garlic mayo

“If you are anything like me, you will smoke out the whole kitchen in the cooking process of this recipe. Fear not, though — the reward is great. All steaks are best when prepped and seasoned simply, cooked quickly and given plenty of time to rest. Do those three things and no amount of smoke will dampen the result. Serve these tasty strips of steak and the indulgent dips with some flatbread and a tangle of watercress.”

by Flora Shedden 

stealw.olivetapenade

Serves 4 people

INGREDIENTS
2-4 sirloin steaks, about 750g in total | Olive oil | 1 tsp each of black and pink peppercorns, cracked | Watercress, to serve
FOR THE TAPENADE
200g pitted green olives | 1 small green chilli | Juice of ½ lime | 1 tbsp white wine vinegar | 2 tbsp olive oil | 1 small bunch of fresh coriander
FOR THE GARLIC MAYO
2 smoked garlic cloves | 2 tbsp good olive oil | Smoked salt (normal if you can’t find) | 100g mayonnaise

01 Set a griddle pan over a high heat, ready to cook the steaks.

02 Lay out a large sheet of greaseproof paper and drizzle a little oil over half the paper. Sprinkle over some cracked pepper. Place the steaks on top in a single layer,…

 

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

7 Snacks, die ihr den ganzen Abend essen könnt

Ihr sucht gesunde Alternativen zu Chips, Schokolade, Plätzchen und Co, die ihr abends bedenkenlos naschen könnt? Kein Problem! Von diesen 7 Snacks nehmt ihr definitiv nicht zu.

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Grüne und schwarze Oliven

Statt zu Chips oder Nachos mit Käse-Dip solltet ihr besser zu grünen und schwarzen Oliven greifen. Am besten schmecken diese pur oder in Olivenöl. Die Früchte des Ölbaums sind reich an ungesättigten Fettsäuren, Vitamin A, Natrium, Kalcium und Eisen – und sollen sogar vor Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen schützen. Schwarze Oliven weisen etwa 185 Kalorien, grüne Oliven rund 140 Kalorien pro 100 Gramm auf. Zum Vergleich: 100 Gramm Kartoffelchips haben etwa 535 Kalorien.

oliven-c

Eingelegte Gurken

Gurken, die man selbst eingelegt hat, sind ein wunderbar würziger und gesunder Snack für zwischendurch – und noch dazu kalorienarm. Auf 100 Gramm Cornichons kommen lediglich 15 Kalorien, aber auch eingelegte Honiggurken sind mit 70 Kalorien immer noch ein leichter Snack. Dasselbe gilt für Mixed Pickles, bei dem ihr bedenkenlos den ganzen Abend zugreifen könnt.

eingelegte-gurken-c

More at: http://www.brigitte.de

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Inolivia at World Food Expo Korea 2015

InoliviaKoreaFoodExpoWe, at Inolivia, are pleased to announce the participation and presentation of our products in the World Food Expo Korea 2015. Inolivia olives won positive comments and taste compliments. Korean expo visitors awarded our effort to introduce Inolivia’s pure & rich flavors in the Korean market. Thank you all!

How to choose a good table olive

Featured-Image1Learn these important points on how to choose a good table olive

Olives are one of those unique foods that don’t only taste delicious, but also offer many health benefits. It is however important to learn how to choose a good table olive, since they vary extensively in appearance, flavour and texture.

We asked the South African Olive Industry Association how to choose a good table olive. Here are a few pointers:

How to choose a good olive1. Looks
The first characteristic to take important notice of is of course the appearance of the olive. The olive must always looks physically appealing and it must make you want to eat it immediately. Physical defects are not good.

2. Aroma
Next important point is smell. A good olive will always smell great. The aroma will give a good indication of how the processing was managed as most of the volatile components are a result of the fermentation process. If not fermented, the aroma is usually that of the added ingredients, like garlic, herbs and various other flavourings. An off-fermentation will be noticeable on the nose, and any off-odour is totally unacceptable in quality table olives.

3. Taste
Right so now we get to the taste. As with anything, taste and flavour are very subjective, so we always suggest that newbies to olives start with a blander product, just like they start new wine drinkers with a sweeter wine. Once hooked on these little delicacies, then move onto products with more flavour, the natural olive flavour in particular. A fully fermented table olive should display a balance between the natural flavour of the fruit, the natural lactic acid and the added salt and vinegar.

4. Texture
A good table olive should have a degree of firmness in the flesh, without being tough or woody. The skin should not be too tough and the flesh should detach from the pit quite easily. The texture is determined by many factors, but most importantly is when the olives are harvested and cultivated. The methods of processing play an important role, which can either maintain the texture of the olive or compromise it.

5. Final tip
It’s important to experience as many different styles and flavours as possible and in so doing, build up a profile of the olives you like.

For more information please visit www.saolive.co.za or find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/SaOliveIndustryAssociation 

Inspired sandwich fillings to jazz up your lunch break

Bar lack of time, one of the biggest deterrents to preparing your own packed lunch is not feeling inspired about what you’re making. This doesn’t just apply to lunch: most people will have reached for the takeaway leaflet after quickly surveying the fridge and not being able to stomach yet another omelette.

So, speed and making something a bit different are both key, and while it’s hard to beat a sandwich for lunchtime convenience, the fillings can be predictable. Tuna mayo, BLT, chicken salad … even the newer fillings – falafel salad, which by some law of sandwich-making is always dry – have started to get samey.

d9de5df6-2595-4c51-9dbe-2d00a4319f53-384x720Here are some quick and different filling ideas to jazz up your lunch break and help you find a new favourite. We’ve suggested baguettes, as the frozen home-baked ones are a godsend when you’ve run out of fresh bread. Plus, if you are assembling at home, they are far less likely to go soggy, due to their sturdy crust.

If you are able to do some quick assembly at work, then this could be the egg sandwich for you. Cook 2 eggs in boiling water for exactly 7 minutes then submerge in cold water. Wrap in a clean kitchen towel or put in a container ready to take to work. In one plastic container, combine crumbled feta, chopped green olives and parsley leaves. In another place sliced pickled beets. Come lunchtime, spread a split baguette with mayo, and top with slices of your egg. Season with salt and pepper, then top with beets and the salad.

Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing are authors of The Little Book of Lunch (Square Peg)

(Source: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/feb/22/lunch-box-sandwich-fillings-olives-feta-sardines-liver-pate)

Blistered Eggplant with Tomatoes, Olives and Feta

eggplant-tomatoes-olives-fetaIngredients

  • 1 large eggplant (about 1 3/4 pounds), cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 3/4 pounds mixed tomatoes, small ones halved or quartered, large ones cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 6 ounces feta, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup mixed olives
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • Bread, such as a baguette, for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat broiler with rack 6 inches from heat source. Place eggplant rounds on a wire rack set on a rimmed baking sheet. Broil until eggplant is blistered and deep brown on one side, 10 to 12 minutes. Flip and broil until blistered on other side, 10 to 12 minutes. Immediately transfer to a large bowl, toss with oil, and cover with a plate. Let stand until softened, 10 minutes.
  2. Arrange eggplant and tomatoes on a platter, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper and drizzling with oil before adding next. Top with feta, olives, and parsley, and serve with bread.

Slow-cooked Greek Easter lamb with lemons, olives & bay

This authentic dish of meltingly tender leg of lamb is roasted with garlic, lemon and potatoes for an irresistible Sunday lunch centerpiece.

slow-cooked-greek-easter-lamb-with-lemons-olives-bay

Ingredients

  • 1 garlic bulb, separated into cloves, half peeled and sliced, half unpeeled
  • 8-10 fresh bay leaves
  • 3 lemons, cut into quarters lengthways
  • 2½ kg leg of lamb
  • 50ml Greek extra virgin olive oil, plus 4 tbsp for the potatoes
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1kg Cypriot potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways (if you can’t find these, any large, waxy variety is fine – try Desirée)
  • 140g Greek Chalkidiki olives (or other large pitted green olives)
  • 125ml red or dry white wine

Method

  1. Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Arrange the unpeeled garlic cloves, 3 bay leaves and the lemon quarters in a large roasting dish and cover with 200ml cold water. Sit the lamb on top, drizzle with the olive oil and rub it in all over.
  2. Using a small sharp knife, cut small incisions in the lamb skin, then tuck the remaining peeled and sliced garlic and bay leaves into these slits.
  3. Season the lamb well and sprinkle over the cinnamon. Cover tightly with foil and place in the oven. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Leave to cook for 4 hrs, skimming the fat from the juices and removing the foil for the final 30 mins of cooking.
  4. After 1 hr, put the potato wedges in a large roasting tin, coat them in 4 tbsp olive oil and season well. Roast in the oven with the lamb for 11/2-2 hrs.
  5. Transfer the cooked lamb to a large piece of foil, wrap tightly and leave to rest for 20-30 mins. Check the potatoes are cooked (if you need to, turn the oven up to 220C/200C fan/gas 7 to finish cooking). Add the olives and wine to the pan juices, simmer them and keep warm until ready to carve. Serve the lamb thickly sliced with the olives, potatoes and Tahini & lemon sauce (see ‘goes well with’), with the meat juices poured over at the last minute.

5 biggest myths about getting pregnant

By Kyra Phillips and Dr. Jamie Grifo – Published February 04, 2015

pregnant-woman-with-cravings-eating-olives-from-jar-bj0t41As we began writing this book, The Whole Life Fertility Plan, and started asking patients, colleagues and friends what kind of questions they wanted answered, we realized there are so many myths out there that really need to be debunked. So not only is our book a guide for women and their families to understand what impacts fertility, but it’s a rich resource of truth.

Not only is it important to understand how age is crucial when it comes to eggs, but it is also important to understand how what you put in your body has an effect on conceiving. It’s also crucial to understand what reproductive options exist for those who have trouble making a baby, and how to navigate all of this in order to come up with your own personalized plan to start a family.

Within all this essential information, one must be aware of rumors, myths and truths.

Here are 5 myths you should be aware of as you begin the baby making process:

1. A woman’s weight doesn’t affect fertility.
MYTH!
1 in 8 infertility patients have low body fat or overexercise.
-1 in 4 infertility patients are overweight.
-If the your BMI (Body Mass Index) is not in proper range, you can stop ovulating.

2. Raising your legs, standing on your head after sex gives you a better chance of getting pregnant.
MYTH!
Sperm are already meeting their destiny by the time you are finished with intercourse. Certain sex positions don’t help your chances either, but keep the Kama Sutra going and have fun! As long as you’re in the right orifice, you are solid.

3. Fatty foods are fine for fertility.
MYTH!
olives cheese-There are good fats and bad fats. Avocado, nuts and olives are great for greasing the biological rails. But bad fats like bagels, pizza, pastries, and anything fried can impact conception. While bacon, sausage and other processed meats are shown to impact sperm, studies are inconclusive when it comes to infertility. Eat plenty of fish instead.

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Head Over Heels For Olives

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

str2_pxvillage_ev_3Olives are often used for flavoring or garnishing food, while olive oil is often used to cook other foods. However olive is eaten, it has high nutritious value. These black or green nut-shaped fruits have powerful anti-inflammatory properties that can protect you against heart diseases, cancer, and other inflammatory diseases like asthma and arthritis. Studies have also found that when unhealthy fats in one’s diet is replaced (yes, unhealthy fats still need to be eliminated) with healthy olive fats or olive oil, LDL cholesterol levels could drop by 18%. A double-blind-placebo-controlled study also found that extracts of olive leaves helped reduce blood pressure in those with hypertension. Olives are rich in an omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid. A study published in the Annals of Oncology reported that oleic acid found in olive oil can help significantly cut the expression of a breast-cancer-promoting-gene by up to 46%. Studies have also found that diabetic patients who ate meals with olive oil gained better control of their blood sugar than those who ate low-fat meals without olive oil. Beside being an excellent source of healthy fats, olives are also filled with iron, vitamin E, and fiber.

References
[1] Collins, Elise Marie. An A-Z Guide to Healing Foods: A Shopper’s Companion. San Francisco, California: Conari Press, 2009. Print.
[2] Murray, Michael, ND., Pizzorno, Joseph, ND., and Pizzorno, Lara, MA, LMT. The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books, 2005. Print.


Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

(Source: http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/healthonlifesjourney/2014/12/head-over-heels-for-olives.html#ixzz3Tbbmrv5P)

Chicken Skewers with Green Olives

Chicken Skewers
INGREDIENTS
750g chicken thigh fillets | 2 tbsp fresh oregano, finely chopped | 2 tbsp olive oil | 2 tbsp lemon juice, strained | 3 cloves garlic, crushed | 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest | 24 bamboo skewers, soaked | lemon wedges, to serve | Green Olive Dressing | ½ cup pitted green olives | 2 tbsp fresh oregano leaves | ⅓ cup olive oil
METHOD
  1. Cut each thigh fillet into 6 long strips. Combine with oregano, oil, juice, garlic and zest in a medium bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and chill 2 hours.
  2. GREEN OLIVE DRESSING
  3. Coarsely chop 4 olives and set aside. Blend or process remaining ingredients until almost smooth. Transfer to serving bowl and top with chopped olives.
  4. Thread 1 strip of chicken onto each skewer. Cook chicken, in batches, on a heated, oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue) for 2-3 minutes each side until cooked through.
  5. Serve chicken skewers with dressing and lemon wedges.

(Source: http://www.womansday.com.au)

Easy Valentine’s Day recipe: Heart-Shaped Savoury Bruschetta

Published Wednesday, Feb 11 2015, 17:35 GMT  |  By

Whether you’re taken and want to spoil your loved one, or fancy hosting a Valentine’s get together for your besties, these cute heart-shaped bruschettas are perfect for the occasion.

This super speedy method involves cutting bread into heart shapes, which are grilled in the oven before being topped with a yummy blend of tomatoes, cheese and olives. Fresh and packed with favour, these savoury treats will go down a storm with those special people in your life.

Valentine's bruschetta

© Primula

Ingredients

  • Slices of thick white or brown bread
  • 80g Primula Cheese with chives
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 300g fresh plum tomatoes
  • 2 Spring onions – peeled and finely sliced
  • 50g black olives – finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil – finely chopped
  • Salt & black pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Garnish : fresh basil leaves

Method

1 Cut the bread into 12 heart shaped slices.
2 Brush one side of each heart with the olive oil and place oiled side up under a preheated hot grill until golden brown. Allow to cool.
3 In the meantime, skin the plum tomatoes by cutting a small cross in the base of each tomato and place them into a bowl. Pour boiling water over the tomatoes to cover them and leave to blanch for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon take the tomatoes out of the hot water, allow to cool. When cool enough to handle, gently peel off the tomato skins.
4 Cut out the stem base and cut into quarters, squeeze out the juice and the seeds and chop the tomatoes into ¼” dice. Drain on kitchen paper.
5 Place the chopped tomatoes, chopped olives, sliced spring onions and chopped Basil into a mixing bowl and season well.
6 Cut the garlic clove in half and rub garlic on to each slice of toasted baguette, then pipe each slice with the cheese around the edge of the bread. Lay the slices on to a serving dish.
7 Spoon the tomato mixture on to the slices and garnish with extra Basil leaves.

(Source: http://www.reveal.co.uk)