Deep-fried olives stuffed with creamy Danish feta

Danish Feta_1349462_1092038INGREDIENTS
80g Danish feta
85ml ( cup) cream cheese
Pinch of dried chilli flakes
3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only
Freshly ground black pepper
50 large pitted olives, well drained (the bigger they are, the easier they are to fill)
120g (1 cup) cake flour
3 extra-large eggs, beaten
120g (1 cup) dried breadcrumbs
Oil, for deep-frying

METHOD
Mix the feta, cream cheese, chilli flakes and thyme until relatively smooth. Season with black pepper. Stuff the olives with this mixture, dust well with flour, dip into beaten egg and then into breadcrumbs.

Heat 3cm oil in a deep frying pan and deep-fry the olives in batches until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel before serving. Makes 50, great for a party snack

(Source: http://www.timeslive.co.za)

Chilli Salmon Delight

str2_amy0210_jg_2-770x4702 servings

2x160g salmon fillet; salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste; a dash of cayenne pepper; olive oil for drizzling; 2 cloves garlic, crushed; some shredded purple cabbage; 1 mini yellow capsicum, halved and sliced; fresh salad leaves like curly endives, etc.

Balsamic dressing
3 tbsp balsamic vinegar; 1 tbsp honey; salt to taste; 1 tbsp olive oil; 1 tsp capers, chopped; 3 green olives, sliced

For the dressing

In a small mixing bowl, combine the balsamic vinegar, honey and salt. Stir to dissolve the salt before drizzling in the olive oil; whisk with a fork or small wire whisk until emulsified. Toss in the capers and green olives. Set aside.

To cook

Preheat a grill pan over medium high heat. Sprinkle salmon with salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and cook for 2-3 minutes each side, or until cooked to your liking. Remove from grill. Add the garlic cloves and grill according to your taste. Remove garlic.

To assemble

Divide the cabbage, capsicum and salad leaves between two serving plates. Place a slice of salmon and a garlic clove on each plate and drizzle the balsamic dressing over the salad. Serve.

(Source: http://www.star2.com)

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

“Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip” by Two Moms in the Raw

The two moms behind the name – Shari Koolik Leidich and Marsha Koolik – joined 9NEWS on Monday to share three recipes you can find in their new cookbook:

Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip

2moms-our-story-largeSandwich spread? Dip? You get to choose! You’ll never find me without a few jars of artichoke hearts in the house, and this dip is the number-one reason why. In five minutes, you’ve got an appetizer that tastes so creamy, you’d swear it’s really fattening or loaded with yogurt or mayo – or both. Neither could be further from the truth! Add to that the nutritional advantages: Artichokes are near the top of the USDA’s list of antioxidant-rich foods, and they also contain fiber, folate, and vitamins C and K. So dip, dip, dip away to your heart’s content. (Makes 2 cups)

Ingredients

  • 2 (14-ounce) jars water-packed artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup pitted green olives, preferably Castelvetrano variety
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

Directions

  1. In a blender, pulse the artichokes, water, oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper until chunky-smooth, 10-15 pulses.
  2. Add the olives and oregano and pulse until slightly smoothed out, 5 to 10 pulses.
  3. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for 2 to 3 days.

(Source: http://www.9news.com)

Chicken Niçoise recipe

An exciting twist on the traditional tuna dish

feathers017.jpg

INGREDIENTS
1 tbsp olive oil | 4 chicken breasts | Sea salt, freshly ground black pepper | 4 eggs | 10 anchovy fillets | ½lb green beans, trimmed, blanched | ½lb yellow beans, trimmed, blanched | ¼ red and yellow peppers, cut in strips | 3 red and yellow teardrop tomatoes, sliced in half | ½ cup Niçoise olives | Low-fat vinaigrette | Sprigs of parsley

for the tapenade

3 anchovies | 1½ garlic cloves | ½ tsp rosemary | Extra virgin olive oil, to cover | 4oz sun-dried tomatoes (chopped) | 4oz Kalamata olives (rough chopped) | for the Potato confit | 1lb new potatoes | Oil to cover | 1 garlic clove, crushed | Small bunch thyme

METHOD
Preheat oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan. Season the chicken breast with salt and pepper. Place the chicken breasts skin side down for 8-10 minutes.
When the skin is crispy, flip the chicken and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Place in the oven for 10-15 minutes depending on the size of the chicken breast. Cook until the juices run clear. Rest for 8 minutes, then slice on an angle.
Bring enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Place the eggs in the boiling water for 6½ minutes. Shock the eggs in an ice bath for 10 minutes.
Peel and cut off the tip of the egg. Season with salt and pepper.
Make the tapenade. In a food processor, purée the anchovies, garlic and rosemary together with a small amount of olive oil to form a smooth paste.
Combine this with the sun-dried tomatoes and olives in a small pan. Cover with olive oil and slowly bring up to temperature. The mixture should not simmer, but should be hot. Once hot, remove from heat and transfer to a container to cool down.
Place the potatoes in a small pan. Cover with oil. Add the thyme and garlic. Cook gently until fork tender.
Strain potatoes and cool on a baking tray. Slice the potatoes in half.
Toss all the ingredients except the chicken, egg and tapenade in a splash of vinaigrette. Season.
Fan the chicken on the plate and place all the other ingredients around the chicken. Garnish with the tapenade, and serve.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

Go with grapes

Moroccan-spiced chicken and grapes (Serves 4-6)

24272877372 onions, halved and sliced
4 large carrots, peeled, halved and sliced
60ml olive oil
1 kg chicken thighs and legs
45ml Moroccan rub
5ml salt
500g black grapes
200g green olives, pitted

Preheat oven to 180°C.
Combine the onions and carrots with 30ml olive oil in a bowl and toss well. Arrange in an oven pan.
In a separate bowl, pour the remaining oil over the chicken. Rub the Moroccan rub and salt all over the chicken then place on top of the carrots and onions.
Roast for 30 minutes, stirring half way.
Remove and add the grapes and olives. Roast for a further 15-20 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through.

(Source: http://www.iol.co.za)

Roast vegetable, haloumi and rice salad

This hearty roast vegetable, haloumi and rice salad tastes equally good warm or at room temperature

991590-jan9_taste 

Ingredients:

  •  2 cups brown medium grain rice
  •  1L Campbell’s Real Stock Vegetable
  •  1 large eggplant, halved lengthways, cut into 2cm thick slices
  •  2 zucchini, thickly sliced
  •  1 red capsicum, cut into chunks
  •  5 garlic cloves, sliced
  •  1/2 cup fresh oregano
  •  1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  •  1 lemon
  •  3/4 cup pitted Sicilian olives or Chalkidiki
  •  250g haloumi, sliced
Step 1 :Place rice and stock in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil over high heat then reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 25 minutes or until cooked and stock has been absorbed. Remove from heat and stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff up rice with a fork.
Step 2: Meanwhile, preheat oven to 220C (200C fan-forced). Place eggplant, zucchini, capsicum, 2 sliced garlic cloves and ¼ cup oregano on a large oven tray. Drizzle with half the oil, season and toss to coat. Roast for 30 minutes or until tender.
Step 3: Toss rice and roasted vegetables in a large bowl and arrange on a platter.
Step 4: Peel rind from lemon in large strips. Juice the lemon.
Step 5: Heat remaining oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Cook rind, olives and remaining garlic and oregano, stirring for 3-4 minutes or until garlic is golden. Set aside with a slotted spoon. Cook haloumi in same pan over medium-high heat for 1-2 minutes each side or until golden. Return olive mixture to pan with lemon juice and swirl pan to coat. Top rice salad with haloumi mixture, making sure you pour the pan juice evenly over the rice.
Originally published on taste.com.au

Antipasto platter

By Madiha Hamid – Published: January 15, 2015

37Method

For the dressing:

•  Mix all the ingredients and whisk them lightly.
•  Keep tasting the mixture every few minutes to check for sourness or sweetness. The dressing should be tangy in taste.
•  Adjust the mixture by adding sugar or honey.

For the vegetables:

•  Marinate the sliced vegetables in the dressing for about an hour or so. Allow them to sit in the refrigerator for the juice to sink in.
•  Sprinkle the veggies with oregano and fresh parsley for added taste.

On the side

•  Cut some pita bread into small, triangular pieces and toast it.
•  Add a small bowl of hummus or salsa sauce to dip the vegetables in.

The concept of antipasti

Antipasto (plural: antipasti) is the Italian name given to the foods offered before a main meal — an appetiser, if you will. This is a delightful way to set the stage for the coming feast and invite family and friends to the dinner table. The presentation of antipasti — the different colours, artful composition, varied tastes and the care taken in its presentation  — serve as reminders for guests that it is time for relaxation, pleasure and indulgence.
According to Italian tradition, the ingredients of antipasti are selected on the basis of colour, flavour and how well they complement one another and the main course. A typical antipasti platter includes olives, pepperoni, anchovies, mushrooms, artichokes, cured meats, pickles, different cheeses and vegetable slices dipped in oil or vinegar. It can be served hot or cold, in bite-size plates or as elegant centrepieces from which everyone is served. In Italy, the most common antipasto dish includes a simple display of cured meats like salami or mortadella slices along with hard cheeses garnished with olives, onions, peppers or sun-dried tomatoes.
The Italians generally save antipasti for special occasions and big parties and celebrations. In Milan, enjoying an aperitif (alcoholic drinks served before a meal) has become a sort of institution. The Milanese consider drinking wine while nibbling on some potato chips, olives and peanuts an hour before the main course an essential for the good life. In fact, it would be unthinkable for the Milanese to start a dinner without an aperitif!.

Winter vegetables for antipasti?

Indulge in your favourite cured meats and cheeses, served with a mix of the best vegetables and fruits the winter season has to offer. These include:

(Source: http://tribune.com.pk/story/818737/antipasto-platter/)

Supercomputer Watson teams with Institute of Culinary Education to create recipes

Fancy a Vietnamese apple kebab with pork, chicken, strawberries, pineapple and mushrooms? The world’s smartest supercomputer thinks you do.

IBM’s giga-powerful Watson came up with the basic formula for the far-out Far Eastern skewer as part of a collaboration with a Manhattan cooking school — the goal being to help chefs come up with never-before-considered flavor combinations.

“Humans can only manage so much (flavor) data at one time,” says chef Michael Laiskonis, the creative director at the Institute of Culinary Education. In addition to the kebabs, Laiskonis asked Watson for a duck dish and received a shopping list featuring the fatty protein plus olives, cherries, ginger, fennel, apple, celery and mushrooms.

watson20f-5-web

“I could imagine duck and cherry, or duck, cherry and ginger, but once I start adding in celery, olives and tomatoes I start to lose the ability to even process that,” Laiskonis says. “I really liked the dish.”

(More: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/eats/supercomputer-watson-teams-chefs-create-recipes-article-1.2084326)

 

Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour

Bonnie Stern | January 16, 2015 | Last Updated: Jan 16 3:52 PM ET

SICILIAN CAPONATA
This Sicilian cooked vegetable salad gets its flavour from the combination of vegetables and the sweet and sour mixture of sugar amd vinegar. We learned a version of this at Maria Grammatico’s La Scuola de Cucina in Trapani. Serve as a salad, a side dish or a sauce for pasta.

stern1

Peter J. Thompson/National Post Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour.

-1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil or more
-2 lbs round Sicilian eggplants, or regular eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes with skin
-4 ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
-16 cippoline onions, peeled and halved or quartered
-1 cup puréed San Marzano tomatoes (freeze the rest and use in soups or sauces)
-1/2 cup each black and green olives, pitted
-2 tbsp capers, rinsed
-2 tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar
-2 tbsp sugar
-kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
-1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1. Heat oil in a large deep skillet on medium-high. Add eggplant, in batches if necessary, and cook 10 to 15 minutes until browned. Remove eggplant to a large bowl. Add more oil to the pan if necessary.
2. Add celery to pan and cook 5 to 6 minutes until partially tender and golden brown. Add to the eggplant.
3. Add onions to pan and cook 10 to 15 minutes until tender and browned. Add celery and eggplant back to pan along with tomato purée, black and green olives and capers. Add 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Cook gently 10 minutes.
4. Bring vinegar and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan. Stir into vegetables. Cook a few minutes.
5. Add parsley and cool. Season to taste. Serve at room temperature.
Makes approximately 6 cups

(Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/16/bonnie-stern-my-souvenirs-of-sicily-include-these-six-savoury-and-sweet-recipes-i-brought-home/)

Olive Pate with Yogurt and Thyme

ntip-pasta-elias-giaourti-thumariIngredients
16 small Cretan barley rusks
40 olives Throumpes Cretan or Chalkidiki
2 tbsp. Yogurt Organic
1 tbsp. Olive oil
coarse salt
fresh pepper
thyme

Method
Pit the olives and put them in the blender.
Add the Yogurt , thyme, olive oil, salt, pepper and beat until homogeneous.
Put some dips in each barley rusks, add a little more thyme and …
Bon appetit … !!!

Try this recipe with Inolivia – Chalkidiki Green Olives

A Bit of Mediterranean Lifestyle Could Help You Live Longer

mediterranean-diet

As if we didn’t already know that life on the Mediterranean is much better for our health, than the hectic city life and fast food of metropolises, it turns out that new research published this week in the British Medical Journal reveals that a Mediterranean Diet is amongst the healthiest out there. But while you may imagine strolls on the beach and kilos of gelato to take home, like many trips to Italy undoubtedly have, the diet that Harvard researchers investigated for the study was the trademark diet known of the Mediterranean – rich in olive oils, fish, vegetables, legumes and low in sugar. With a little added touch; a glass of wine traditional with every meal. And what the researchers found is that women who follow the strictly healthy fat diet have significantly longer life spans than women who don’t have a healthy diet – keeping them younger and in better health for years more than the global average.

Studying nutritional data from 4,676 participating in the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study, the research team was able to determine which individuals’ diets were the healthiest. And what they found was that women whose dietary habits hewed significant similarities with a Mediterranean diet had elongated telomeres at the ends of their DNA, giving them longer cellular life-spans and healthier skin as a trade-off.

“We know that having shorter telomeres is associated with a lower life expectancy and a greater risk of cancer, heart disease, and other diseases” study coauthor from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Immaculata De Vivo says. “Certain lifestyle factors like obesity, sugary sodas, and smoking have been found to accelerate telomere shortening.”

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A fresh take on traditional paella

BY ERIC AKIS, VICTORIA TIMES COLONIST NOVEMBER 25, 2014

Paella is a flavoured rice dish that originated in Valencia, Spain. It’s named after the wide and fairly shallow pan it’s cooked in. If you don’t have a paella pan, you can buy one at a well-stocked kitchenware store. You could also simply use a large skillet to make paella.

Short- and medium-grain types of Spanish rice, such as Bomba, are the best choice for paella, as they absorb moisture well and have a nice bite when cooked. You’ll find them at some Mediterranean-style food stores. If you can’t, in my recipe I give the option to use risotto rice or long-grain white rice.

This vegetarian paella recipe is loaded with vegetables and tastily flavoured. Add some good bread and wine and say “Olé!”

10413563

Grilled Vegetable Paella with Artichokes, Olives and Peas

There’s a rainbow of colour in this vegetable-rich dish. (Prep. time: 40 minutes – Cooking time: About 40 minutes)

For the grilled vegetables

8 slices zucchini, 1/2 in. (1.3 cm) thick | 8 onion wedges, 1 in. (2.5 cm) thick | 6 medium mushrooms, each halved | 8 wedges red or yellow bell pepper, or a mix of both, 1 in. (2.5 cm) thick | 2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat your grill to medium-high. Place the vegetables and mushrooms in a bowl and toss with the oil, salt and pepper. Grill the vegetables and mushrooms one to two minutes per side, or until lightly charred and just tender. Set on a platter and set aside until needed.

For the paella

1 tsp (5 mL) saffron threads | 2 tbsp (30 mL) boiling water | 3 tbsp (45 mL) olive oil | 1/2 cup (125 mL) finely chopped onion | 1/2 cup (125 mL) finely chopped green bell pepper | 2 ripe on-the-vine tomatoes, finely chopped | 1 large garlic clove, minced | 1/2 tsp (2.5 mL) paprika | 1/2 tsp (2.5 mL) oregano | 1/2 tsp (2.5 mL) cumin | 4 cups (1 L) vegetable stock, plus more if needed | 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) Spanish rice (such as Bomba), Italian-style risotto rice (such as Arborio), or long-grain white rice

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1, 14-oz (398-mL) can artichoke hearts, each quartered | 16 to 20 black or green olives | 1/4 cup (60 mL) frozen peas, thawed | 1 tbsp (15 mL) chopped fresh parsley

Crumble the saffron into a small bowl, pour in the boiling water and let steep 5 minutes.

Place the oil in a paella pan or large (12 in, or 30.5 cm, wide) skillet and set over medium heat. Add the onion, bell pepper and garlic and cook 3 to 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes, paprika, oregano and cumin and cook 3 to 4 minutes more, or until the mixture is very tender and almost sticky. Add the rice and cook and stir 2 minutes more.

Mix in the 4 cups (1 L) of stock, steeped saffron, salt and pepper, increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and gently simmer for 18 to 20 minutes, or until the rice is firm-tender and still slightly wet (add a little more stock if it is not).

Nestle the artichokes, olives and grilled vegetables into the rice. Cover and cook 5 minutes more, or until the vegetables are heated through. Sprinkle on the peas, cover and let the paella rest a few minutes off the heat before serving, sprinkled with parsley.

Makes 4 servings Eric Akis is the author of the book Everyone Can Cook Everything.

Braised chicken with olives and pine nuts

Chicken joints braised in white wine, with a lively garlic and orange-zest finish

This is Sicilian inspired and can be sweet-sour (in which case add the raisins) or simply savoury (in which case leave them out). Apart from a quick browning on the stove top, this dish really looks after itself. (Serves 4)

INGREDIENTS
Braised_chicken_wi_3098301b1½ tbsp olive oil
8 chicken thighs, or a chicken jointed into 8 pieces
3 medium red onions, peeled and cut into half-moon-shaped wedges about 1cm (½in) thick at the widest part
2 celery sticks, trimmed and diced
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 small dried chillis, crumbled
500g (1lb 2oz) baby waxy potatoes, halved
250ml (9fl oz) white wine
finely grated zest of ½ orange, plus juice of 1
75g (2¾oz) raisins, soaked in boiling water for half an hour, then drained (optional)
2 tbsp capers, rinsed
75g (2¾oz) green olives
30g (1oz) pine nuts, toasted

for the gremolata
2 garlic cloves
zest of 1 small orange, removed in strips (cut away any bitter white pith)
leaves from about 10 stems of mint, torn

METHOD
Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4.Heat the olive oil in a wide oven-proof sauté pan or shallow casserole (large enough to hold the chicken in a single layer – or use two) and brown the chicken on both sides, seasoning as you go. You are just trying to get a good colour, not cook the chicken through. Remove the joints to a dish as they’re ready.

Pour off all but 1 tbsp of oil from the pan and add the onions. Cook over a medium heat to colour, then add the celery, cooking for two minutes before adding the garlic and chilli. Cook for a further minute, add the potatoes and toss them around, then add the wine, orange juice and zest, and the raisins (if using). Put the chicken back (plus any juices that have run out of it), skin-side up in a single layer. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat to a simmer. Season well and transfer to the oven for 40 minutes.

Add the capers and olives 15 minutes before the end of the cooking time, stirring them in around the chicken joints. The cooking juices will have reduced, the potatoes should be tender and the chicken will be cooked through.

Meanwhile make the gremolata by chopping the garlic and orange zest finely, then mix with the mint. Toss this over the chicken with the toasted pine nuts just before serving. A big watercress salad is all you need on the side – everything else is in the pan.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

Citrus Salad

Ingredients

12 baresane olives – 12 cerignola olives – 1 Tbsp bomba calabrese – 1/2 cup olive oil, divided – 2 navel oranges – 2 blood oranges – 4 clementines – 1 lemon – 2 ruby grapefruits – 1/2 pomegranate – Salt (we use Maldon) and freshly ground black pepper – 1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves – 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves

citrus recipes

Instructions

  • Smash olives with side of knife and remove pits.
  • In a medium bowl, combine olives, bomba, and half the olive oil. Stir well and set aside to marinate.
  • Slice the top and bottom off navel oranges and blood oranges. Remove the peel and white pith carefully with knife. Slice across cross-sections and set aside.
  • Peel clementines, individually segment slices, and set aside.
  • Slice the top and bottom off lemon and grapefruit. Remove peel and all white pith carefully. Slice each segment from membrane and set aside.
  • Slice pomegranate in half. Over a bowl of cold water, hit pomegranate with the back of a spoon so each individual seed falls into the water. Remove any white particles. Strain seeds and set aside.
  • On a large, flat serving plate, randomly arrange all citrus fruits and segments, and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds. Spoon olives over fruit and drizzle with remaining olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and top with parsley and mint.
  • Serve immediately.

(Source: http://canadaam.ctvnews.ca)

Olive bread is perfect for fall

A mix of olives with an undercurrent of rosemary makes a savory loaf that’s a perfect complement to autumn soups and stews.

If extending an olive branch is a symbol of peace, imagine the reaction you’ll get when you extend a loaf of savory olive bread, each slice an attractive mosaic of ingredients. On the other hand, if there’s not enough to go around, war may break out. Worth the risk.

ows_141339677056209As with any recipe defined by a main ingredient — in this case, olives — it’s best to seek out good quality olives. Bypass the jars and cans and peruse the olive bars found in many grocery stores, which also lets you buy only the amount you need. While Kalamata are the most common black olives in olive breads, some may prefer the smaller Niçoise with their concentration of flavor. There are a broad range of green olives, from quite fruity to deeply briny. Avoid any stuffed varieties, though; the fillings will create wet pockets in the bread and compete with the olives’ flavor. This recipe uses a mix of purple-black Kalamatas and plump, green Sicilians. Experiment! Some will ows_141339672622626favor an all-Kalamata loaf, while others go only green. The dough also incorporates some olive oil into the mix. In this case, a basic olive oil suffices because the bread bakes at a high temperature; save your spendier oil for fresh vinaigrette. This recipe also uses a kneading technique that’s becoming more popular, a bonus with this soft dough. Instead of massaging and pummeling the dough on a counter and being tempted to add more flour, place the dough in an oiled bowl, then with wet hands use a stretch-and-fold action, pulling one end up and over, repeating on all four “sides” of the bowl. Do this three times in 15-minute intervals and you’ll feel the dough start to develop its body, becoming smoother and more easily handled. It’s actually pretty cool. (And if that sounds time-consuming, it’s little different from baking several pans of cookies.) Set the dough aside to rise for about an hour, shape and let rise for another 30 to 40 minutes, then bake. Sharing such a loaf with people you love is the very definition of “breaking bread,” which is one of the most peaceable things we can do.

(Source: http://www.startribune.com)

Fancy some olives with your beer? Menabrea hope so

by STEPHEN EMERSON

THERE was a time, in the not too distant past, that a packet of peanuts and a pint of heavy was the standard order in pubs across Scotland with the slightly more adventurous beer options locked away in the bar fridge gathering dust.

656221328Today’s craft beer explosion and influx of brews from across the continent has transformed our options at the taps while pub food, a rarity before the smoking ban, is now widely available. Our attitudes to beer and food has changed which has in turn opened the door for imports like Menabrea whose makers hope that we’ll soon be sipping their offering with a range of apertivos. Menabrea, available in draft and bottle, is a punchy little number. Dull in colour and medium-bodied it is both mellow and refreshing with a welcome citrus bite to clear the palette.

The Italian firm offer Menabrea Bionda in draught – a 4.8% ABV pale lager – and Menabrea Ambrata at 5.0% ABV in 330ml bottles. Menabrea is commonly paired with aperitivo in Italy – small snack dishes commonly served with drinks in Italy, such as olives and nuts – and as part of the beer’s launch in Scotland, outlets will be provided with produce and custom Menabrea aperitivo dishes to serve with each order.

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