Choc-olive cake

Choc_olive_cake_This_is_best_served_to_your_enemies_accordingThis is best served to your enemies according to the Eating For Two cookbook

Artist’s photos of expectant mums’ bizarre food combinations include Oreos with toothpaste and oranges with KETCHUP

Pregnant women hankering for a touch of coal with their steak or tomato sauce on their oranges will now be able to satisfy their odd cravings with the launch of a new virtual cookbook. 

Eating for Two Cookbook, a project by artists Vicky Jacob-Ebbinghaus and Juarez Rodrigues, has detailed instructions on how to create these strange meals and is accompanied by highly-stylised imagery.

The duo were inspired by a pregnant friend who would sneak out of bed at night and eat Oreos and toothpaste secretly while everyone else was sleeping.

(Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

Thanksgiving salad

NANA’S ORANGE, FENNEL AND OLIVE SALAD WITH MARINATED FETA

thanksgiving salad tll 1109MARINATED FETA:
1 pound block feta cheese
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup roughly chopped or torn fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon black pepper 

SALAD:
2 cups sliced fennel (halved lengthwise, cored and thinly sliced lengthwise with a sharp knife)
3/4 cup chopped feathery fennel fronds
1 3/4 cups pitted whole Italian oiled-cured black olives (substitute Kalamata if desired)
8 navel oranges, divided use
6 blood oranges or ruby red grapefruit
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Continue reading

“Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip” by Two Moms in the Raw

The two moms behind the name – Shari Koolik Leidich and Marsha Koolik – joined 9NEWS on Monday to share three recipes you can find in their new cookbook:

Creamy Olive and Artichoke Dip

2moms-our-story-largeSandwich spread? Dip? You get to choose! You’ll never find me without a few jars of artichoke hearts in the house, and this dip is the number-one reason why. In five minutes, you’ve got an appetizer that tastes so creamy, you’d swear it’s really fattening or loaded with yogurt or mayo – or both. Neither could be further from the truth! Add to that the nutritional advantages: Artichokes are near the top of the USDA’s list of antioxidant-rich foods, and they also contain fiber, folate, and vitamins C and K. So dip, dip, dip away to your heart’s content. (Makes 2 cups)

Ingredients

  • 2 (14-ounce) jars water-packed artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup pitted green olives, preferably Castelvetrano variety
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

Directions

  1. In a blender, pulse the artichokes, water, oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper until chunky-smooth, 10-15 pulses.
  2. Add the olives and oregano and pulse until slightly smoothed out, 5 to 10 pulses.
  3. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for 2 to 3 days.

(Source: http://www.9news.com)

Pair olives with other flavours for memorable meals

Linda Hoffman10:02 a.m. MST November 4, 2014

There are so many varieties of olives available today. It’s valuable to sample and taste them to find favorites. Certainly olives belong with cheeses and roasted vegetables as an appetizer, but they have many applications within recipes for memorable meals.

3923651693A sweeter olive, such as the Italian Cerignola olive, pairs well with tart, earthy goat cheese. Bake them into a quiche together. The nutty flavor of tiny French Niçoise olives is perfect for the renowned Niçoise salad with oily tuna and hard-cooked eggs, roasted red peppers and green beans. Fruity, salty Picholine olives from the South of France pair well with Provolone cheese. And the classic Kalamata olive from Greece is delicious with lemon and feta cheese, with sun-dried tomatoes, or even baked into bread or used as a pizza topping.

Native to the Mediterranean region, olives and their oil figure prominently in cuisines from each country where they are grown. Try the Spanish Manzanillo olives with raisins in a dish that features chicken, tomatoes and shaved Manchego cheese. Bright green Castelvetrano olives from Sicily provide a variation on the salty, sweet, bitter theme, and work well in a salad with navel or blood orange sections.

The sweet oranges, bitter greens, and salty olives make a great combination in the accompanying recipe for Orange and Olive Salad. Or try the following chicken dish, a recent favorite from cooking classes.

Bon appétit!

Continue reading

Bar Snack Recipe: Candied Olives by Cadet’s Gabriella Mlynarczyk

This cocktail garnish will steal the spotlight

If you don’t want a new addiction, stay far away from Cadet’s candied olives. Their combination of sweet and savory makes them too easy to pop one after the other into your mouth.

Bartender Gabriella Mlynarczyk makes them to garnish her Vodka Fennel Cobbler. If you want to mix cocktails at home, she says the spicy version with togarashi works perfectly with a mezcal Old Fashioned and Rob Roy.

cadetcandiedolivesHowever, I think these olives would be fine standing alone as a bar snack. Huge news coming from me considering I don’t normally eat cocktail garnishes, not even brandied cherries. But one night at Cadet’s bar, Mlynarczyk made the mistake of giving me a handful to try out. I couldn’t get enough of these and had to have the recipe. They’d be perfect for your holiday cocktail parties or during a solo Netflix marathon.

Candied Olives
Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon togarashi (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons sugar for sprinkling on olives after baking
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup cane sugar
  • 1 cup firm green olives such as Castelvetrano

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a sheet pan with foil or use a Silpat on top of sheet pan, set aside.
  • In a heavy-bottomed pan, add your olives, lemon, water, and 1/4 cup of sugar. Set onto stove on a medium heat and allow liquid to reduce to a syrup. It’s ready when you drag a spoon through the syrup and the trail left behind takes a couple of seconds to close back up. The thicker the syrup gets, the longer it will take for that trail to close.
  • When reduced, spoon out the olives onto the sheet pan and separate them so they don’t touch, place in oven, and bake for half an hour.
  • Remove from oven, place in a bowl, and sprinkle with sugar and optional togarashi.

Recipe courtesy Gabriella Mlynarczyk of Cadet

(Source: http://www.lamag.com/liquidlablog/candied-olives-recipe-cadet-gabriella-mlynarczyk/#sthash.CbIYUwJC.dpuf)

Bright and bold, a salad for the season

Recipe for Fennel Salad with Oranges and Olives

BY ELLIE KRIEGER, THE WASHINGTON POST

Salad probably is not the first thing that comes to mind when you are planning a winter meal. Cold weather calls for hearty, belly-warming soups, stews and casseroles, of course. But to accompany those stick-to-your-ribs dishes, there is no better match than a salad made with seasonal produce — one that provides crisp, bright contrast and has substance enough to stand up to them.

10799145This salad is a quintessential example, a combination of bold, fresh tastes and colours that come together as a perfect foil for a hot one-pot main course. The thinly sliced fennel at its base is cool and refreshing, but it is not shy like a tender spring lettuce. Rather, it provides a definitive anise flavour and a big crunch that plays off the sweet-tart juicy citrus, one of the season’s produce highlights.

This time of year, oranges are plump and perfect, and there is a remarkable variety to choose from. If you can find them, get blood oranges, whose flesh has a stunning red hue and a generous pucker. Cara Cara navel oranges, a bit sweeter and gloriously pink inside, are also a special treat. If neither of those is available, regular old navel oranges work just as well.

Salty olives and slices of red onion add punches of contrasting flavour, and a citrus vinaigrette ties it all together. Pair this salad with hearty Mediterranean-style stews, soups, bakes and braises, and it will brighten your day as much as the hot dish warms it.

FENNEL SALAD WITH ORANGES AND OLIVES

6 servings

From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.

4 blood oranges (may substitute 3 Cara Cara or other navel oranges)
2 medium fennel bulbs, cored and thinly sliced, plus a few fronds reserved for garnish
1/2 cup pitted black olives, such as Kalamata or Sicilian cured olives, cut in half
Continue reading

A Chicken’s Tour of the Mediterranean

A Chicken Thighs Recipe With Mediterranean Flavor

FEB. 27, 2015 | City Kitchen | By

A good cook needs an assortment of chicken recipes up his or her sleeve. It’s fair to say that most carnivores like chicken, but even chicken fans prefer a bit of variety, a break from the familiar roasted, fried, grilled.

Evan Sung for The New York Times

Evan Sung for The New York Times

Braising chicken is a technique to master. The simple process of browning the meat, then adding liquid and gently simmering, ensures tenderness and succulence.

Most people I know agree that the thigh is the choicest part of the bird under most circumstances. I find that chicken thighs make the best braises, and I recommend using skin-on bone-in thighs for the best flavor. (In these days of skinless boneless everything and fear of fat, these unadulterated thighs are scarcer than before, but persevere; they can be found.)

One of the best chicken braises I know uses a broadly Mediterranean approach. The classic combination of chicken with lemon and olives is found throughout the region, but a minor tweaking of the basic recipe is all it takes to give this braise a regional accent.

The example given here is Italianate: rosemary, garlic, fennel seed and red pepper. Marinate the thighs, surround them with lemon wedges, and brown them in the oven. Add a handful of green and black olives and a ladleful of chicken broth. Simmer a bit. The result: earthy, herbaceous, lemony. Serve with polenta.

To give the same dish a more Provençal profile, use thyme sprigs rather than rosemary and choose oil-cured black or tiny niçoise olives. Serve with potatoes or egg noodles. For a North African feel, use large green olives and add toasted ground cumin seeds and hot paprika. Serve with flatbread or couscous.

As for lemons, any kind may be used. Meyer lemo

ns are nice, since they are sweeter than others and the soft skin is mild enough to eat. But ordinary Eureka lemons are fine, thinly sliced, as are rinsed salt-preserved lemons cut in small cubes.

Of course, you should try to get the best chicken you can. Choose organic, free-range, heritage birds when possible. Even at $4 a pound, that’s far less expensive than other prime cuts of meat, and you are more likely to get flavorful chicken if it is of noble provenance. Free-range birds generally have firmer muscles than cheaper “factory style” birds. If you have tasted chicken in other countries, you know that firm meat and flavor go hand in hand.

Once you are hooked on the chicken-lemon-olive theme, you’ll find many more ways to practice it. Imagine, for instance, a chicken sandwich smeared with a garlicky chopped olive tapenade and a dab of bright lemony mayonnaise. You get the idea.

(Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/dining/a-chicken-thighs-recipe-with-mediterranean-flavor.html?_r=0)

Inspired sandwich fillings to jazz up your lunch break

Bar lack of time, one of the biggest deterrents to preparing your own packed lunch is not feeling inspired about what you’re making. This doesn’t just apply to lunch: most people will have reached for the takeaway leaflet after quickly surveying the fridge and not being able to stomach yet another omelette.

So, speed and making something a bit different are both key, and while it’s hard to beat a sandwich for lunchtime convenience, the fillings can be predictable. Tuna mayo, BLT, chicken salad … even the newer fillings – falafel salad, which by some law of sandwich-making is always dry – have started to get samey.

d9de5df6-2595-4c51-9dbe-2d00a4319f53-384x720Here are some quick and different filling ideas to jazz up your lunch break and help you find a new favourite. We’ve suggested baguettes, as the frozen home-baked ones are a godsend when you’ve run out of fresh bread. Plus, if you are assembling at home, they are far less likely to go soggy, due to their sturdy crust.

If you are able to do some quick assembly at work, then this could be the egg sandwich for you. Cook 2 eggs in boiling water for exactly 7 minutes then submerge in cold water. Wrap in a clean kitchen towel or put in a container ready to take to work. In one plastic container, combine crumbled feta, chopped green olives and parsley leaves. In another place sliced pickled beets. Come lunchtime, spread a split baguette with mayo, and top with slices of your egg. Season with salt and pepper, then top with beets and the salad.

Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing are authors of The Little Book of Lunch (Square Peg)

(Source: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/feb/22/lunch-box-sandwich-fillings-olives-feta-sardines-liver-pate)

Blistered Eggplant with Tomatoes, Olives and Feta

eggplant-tomatoes-olives-fetaIngredients

  • 1 large eggplant (about 1 3/4 pounds), cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 3/4 pounds mixed tomatoes, small ones halved or quartered, large ones cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 6 ounces feta, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup mixed olives
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • Bread, such as a baguette, for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat broiler with rack 6 inches from heat source. Place eggplant rounds on a wire rack set on a rimmed baking sheet. Broil until eggplant is blistered and deep brown on one side, 10 to 12 minutes. Flip and broil until blistered on other side, 10 to 12 minutes. Immediately transfer to a large bowl, toss with oil, and cover with a plate. Let stand until softened, 10 minutes.
  2. Arrange eggplant and tomatoes on a platter, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper and drizzling with oil before adding next. Top with feta, olives, and parsley, and serve with bread.

Slow-cooked Greek Easter lamb with lemons, olives & bay

This authentic dish of meltingly tender leg of lamb is roasted with garlic, lemon and potatoes for an irresistible Sunday lunch centerpiece.

slow-cooked-greek-easter-lamb-with-lemons-olives-bay

Ingredients

  • 1 garlic bulb, separated into cloves, half peeled and sliced, half unpeeled
  • 8-10 fresh bay leaves
  • 3 lemons, cut into quarters lengthways
  • 2½ kg leg of lamb
  • 50ml Greek extra virgin olive oil, plus 4 tbsp for the potatoes
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1kg Cypriot potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways (if you can’t find these, any large, waxy variety is fine – try Desirée)
  • 140g Greek Chalkidiki olives (or other large pitted green olives)
  • 125ml red or dry white wine

Method

  1. Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Arrange the unpeeled garlic cloves, 3 bay leaves and the lemon quarters in a large roasting dish and cover with 200ml cold water. Sit the lamb on top, drizzle with the olive oil and rub it in all over.
  2. Using a small sharp knife, cut small incisions in the lamb skin, then tuck the remaining peeled and sliced garlic and bay leaves into these slits.
  3. Season the lamb well and sprinkle over the cinnamon. Cover tightly with foil and place in the oven. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Leave to cook for 4 hrs, skimming the fat from the juices and removing the foil for the final 30 mins of cooking.
  4. After 1 hr, put the potato wedges in a large roasting tin, coat them in 4 tbsp olive oil and season well. Roast in the oven with the lamb for 11/2-2 hrs.
  5. Transfer the cooked lamb to a large piece of foil, wrap tightly and leave to rest for 20-30 mins. Check the potatoes are cooked (if you need to, turn the oven up to 220C/200C fan/gas 7 to finish cooking). Add the olives and wine to the pan juices, simmer them and keep warm until ready to carve. Serve the lamb thickly sliced with the olives, potatoes and Tahini & lemon sauce (see ‘goes well with’), with the meat juices poured over at the last minute.

Genuss vom Mittelmeer

Knoblauch und Oliven

Die mediterrane Küche gilt als gesund und leicht. Gerlinde Mohr aus Anzefahr bietet auf hessischen Wochenmärkten südländische Spezialitäten wie ihre Frisch- und Schafskäse-Dips an.

Genuss-vom-Mittelmeer_ArtikelQuer

Anzefahr. Der Duft von Oliven, Knoblauch und Gewürzen schlägt einem beim Betreten des Hauses von Gerlinde Mohr in Anzefahr entgegen. In der Küche bereiten die Mitarbeiterinnen die Angebote für drei Wochenmärkte zu.
Es gibt eingelegte Oliven in 16 verschiedenen Sorten: schwarze marokkanische mit Salbei, Oregano und Peperoni ebenso wie die dunkelroten griechischen „Kalamata“ in Lake oder große grüne mit Mandeln gefüllt, mit Liebstöckel in Öl. Seit 27 Jahren bietet Gerlinde Mohr auf dem Markt Oliven an. „Damals war ich in Marburg die erste“, erzählt sie. Die Idee dazu lieferte ihr Schwager, der in Südhessen mit einem solchen Angebot bereits erfolgreich war.

Und da sie ihr Studium finanzieren musste,  verkaufte sie auf dem Marburger Wochenmarkt Oliven. „Ich habe ganz klein angefangen“, erzählt die gelernte Großhandelskauffrau. Nach und nach erweiterte sie ihr Sortiment mit Antipasti und ihren selbst kreierten Frischkäse-Dips.

„Daran experimentiere ich ziemlich lang“, sagt Gerlinde Mohr.  Die Cremes enthalten keine Konservierungsstoffe, sollten aber eine Woche haltbar sein.

Continue reading

Chicken Skewers with Green Olives

Chicken Skewers
INGREDIENTS
750g chicken thigh fillets | 2 tbsp fresh oregano, finely chopped | 2 tbsp olive oil | 2 tbsp lemon juice, strained | 3 cloves garlic, crushed | 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest | 24 bamboo skewers, soaked | lemon wedges, to serve | Green Olive Dressing | ½ cup pitted green olives | 2 tbsp fresh oregano leaves | ⅓ cup olive oil
METHOD
  1. Cut each thigh fillet into 6 long strips. Combine with oregano, oil, juice, garlic and zest in a medium bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and chill 2 hours.
  2. GREEN OLIVE DRESSING
  3. Coarsely chop 4 olives and set aside. Blend or process remaining ingredients until almost smooth. Transfer to serving bowl and top with chopped olives.
  4. Thread 1 strip of chicken onto each skewer. Cook chicken, in batches, on a heated, oiled grill plate (or grill or barbecue) for 2-3 minutes each side until cooked through.
  5. Serve chicken skewers with dressing and lemon wedges.

(Source: http://www.womansday.com.au)

Cheers! An appetizer worth toasting

Wow them on New Year’s Eve, with very little effort, with these appetizers that put the cocktail glass into “seafood cocktail.” You simply poach the shrimp in an aromatic mixture of garlic, lemongrass and pepper, then dangle in martini glasses with baby lettuces and seafood cocktail sauce. A lemongrass swizzle stick with olives completes the look and tangy flavour.

The recipe calls for shelling and deveining the shrimp, but I bought frozen ones that were already shelled and deveined at Wellington Wholesale Seafood, in Hintonburg at 1105 Wellington St. W., where the owner was kind enough to count out and sell me exactly the number I needed. It saved a picky step and I doubt much flavour was lost by not having the shells in the poaching liquid.

The recipe comes from Vancouver chef Mary Mackay in The Girls Who Dish! cookbook. Mackay says “despite my culinary training, I still like to serve this with store-bought cocktail sauce.” If you want to go slightly more gourmet, and more local, get Lowertown Canning Company’s Cocktail sauce, made with local tomatoes and fresh shaved locally grown horseradish, for $7 at Lapointe Fish, 46 ByWard Market.

11875601.JPG

Items for Laura Robin’s column: Prawntini (Julie Oliver / Ottawa Citizen)

Prawn-tinis | Makes: 4 servings | Preparation time: about 30 minutes

20 tiger prawns
1 stalk lemongrass
4 1/4 cups (about 1 L) water
5 whole peppercorns, crushed
5 garlic cloves, smashed
1 tsp (5 mL) salt
8 green olives, stuffed with pimento
1/4 cup (60 mL) seafood cocktail sauce
2 tbsp (30 mL) prepared mayonnaise
2 cups (500 mL) mixed baby lettuces
Half a lemon, cut into 4 wedges

1. Remove the shells from the tiger prawns, leaving the tails intact. Place the shells in a medium saucepan. De-vein the prawns and set aside.
2. Cut 6 inches (15 cm) off the top of the lemongrass stalk and set aside. Chop the remaining lemongrass into 1/2-inch (1.2-cm) pieces. Add the lemongrass, water, peppercorns, garlic cloves and salt to the pan with the prawn shells and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Let cool to room temperature. Strain the stock through a fine sieve.
3. Return the liquid to the pot and bring to a boil. Stir the prawns and remove from the heat. Let the prawns poach for 30 seconds, until pink. Remove the prawns from the stock and cool to room temperature.
4. Make a hole in each olive with a toothpick or bamboo skewer. Separate the reserved stalk of lemongrass into 4 skewers and slide 2 green olives onto each.
5. In a small bowl, stir together the cocktail sauce and mayonnaise.
6. To assemble, line 4 martini glasses with the mixed baby lettuces and top with a dollop of cocktail mayonnaise. Place 5 prawns, evenly spaced, head first into the cocktail mayonnaise, leaving their tails hanging over the edge of the glass. Place a lemongrass skewer of olives in the middle of the glass, leaning to one side, and garnish with a lemon wedge.

(Source: http://ottawacitizen.com)

Easy Valentine’s Day recipe: Heart-Shaped Savoury Bruschetta

Published Wednesday, Feb 11 2015, 17:35 GMT  |  By

Whether you’re taken and want to spoil your loved one, or fancy hosting a Valentine’s get together for your besties, these cute heart-shaped bruschettas are perfect for the occasion.

This super speedy method involves cutting bread into heart shapes, which are grilled in the oven before being topped with a yummy blend of tomatoes, cheese and olives. Fresh and packed with favour, these savoury treats will go down a storm with those special people in your life.

Valentine's bruschetta

© Primula

Ingredients

  • Slices of thick white or brown bread
  • 80g Primula Cheese with chives
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 300g fresh plum tomatoes
  • 2 Spring onions – peeled and finely sliced
  • 50g black olives – finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil – finely chopped
  • Salt & black pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Garnish : fresh basil leaves

Method

1 Cut the bread into 12 heart shaped slices.
2 Brush one side of each heart with the olive oil and place oiled side up under a preheated hot grill until golden brown. Allow to cool.
3 In the meantime, skin the plum tomatoes by cutting a small cross in the base of each tomato and place them into a bowl. Pour boiling water over the tomatoes to cover them and leave to blanch for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon take the tomatoes out of the hot water, allow to cool. When cool enough to handle, gently peel off the tomato skins.
4 Cut out the stem base and cut into quarters, squeeze out the juice and the seeds and chop the tomatoes into ¼” dice. Drain on kitchen paper.
5 Place the chopped tomatoes, chopped olives, sliced spring onions and chopped Basil into a mixing bowl and season well.
6 Cut the garlic clove in half and rub garlic on to each slice of toasted baguette, then pipe each slice with the cheese around the edge of the bread. Lay the slices on to a serving dish.
7 Spoon the tomato mixture on to the slices and garnish with extra Basil leaves.

(Source: http://www.reveal.co.uk)

When life gives you onions, no need to cry

Karen Makowski wrote in a few months ago, looking for salad recipes to use up a bumper crop of onions from the garden. Clearly, it’s not gardening season right now, but we can dream. In the meantime, these recipes also work as refreshing winter salads.
Thanks to Linda Snider for her recipe for onion and orange salad. I also found a version that combines onions with tomatoes, cucumbers and olives.

Onion and Orange Salad

onion16 large oranges
45 ml (3 tbsp) red wine vinegar
90 ml (6 tbsp) olive oil
5 ml (1 tsp) dried oregano
Salad greens
1 red onion, thinly sliced in rings
250 ml (1 cup) black olives (see note)
Black pepper, to taste
60 ml (1/4 cup) chopped fresh chives
Peel oranges and then cut each into 4 or 5 crosswise slices. Transfer to shallow dish and drizzle with vinegar and oil and sprinkle with oregano. Toss gently, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
Arrange salad greens in a shallow serving dish. Toss oranges again, arrange on greens. Arrange onion and black olives on top. Add pepper to taste and garnish with chives.

Tester’s notes: I like the crunch and the combination of intense flavours in this easy salad. Linda continues the fruit theme by replacing the olives with blueberries. I did use olives — I like the mix of hot, sweet and salty tastes — but I cut the amount to about 60 ml (1/4 cup), using them as an accent rather than a main ingredient.

Onion, Tomato and Cucumber Salad

onion24 plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise, seeded and thinly sliced
1/4 red onion, peeled, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
1 English cucumber, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
30 ml (2 tbsp) olive oil
15 ml (1 tbsp) red wine vinegar
Salt and pepper, to taste
Place tomatoes, onions and cucumbers in a serving bowl. Drizzle with oil and vinegar and add salt and pepper to taste. Let flavours blend for 30 minutes, then serve.

Tester’s notes: Another easy chopped salad. Some crumbled feta cheese would be a good addition.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 4, 2015 C5

(Source: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com)

Cut, it’s a wrap

A little of Greece in your dish 

BY ,  FEBRUARY 1, 2015

I think we can all agree the grilled chicken here isn’t exactly the hallmark of Tufts Dining. Always more dry than moist, eating it by itself is about as fulfilling as a limp handshake. Yet, it’s weaseled its way in as the central ingredient of today’s alternative dining hall recipe. I’m gonna pull an Aladdin here and just ask you to trust me. Behold, the Mediterranean Chicken Wrap:

chicken olivesLay a 10-inch wrap (a tortilla will do in a pinch) across your plate.
Spread about a scoop’s worth of hummus (of any kind) in a line across the wrap, leaving an inch or so of space at the bottom to fold over later.
Put three or four slices of cucumber on top of the hummus.
Place two slices of tomato on top of the cucumbers. (Alternatively, you can add a handful of cherry tomatoes sliced length-wise – they tend to taste better.)
Put your preferred type of greens (I recommend the spring mix) over the tomato.
If you’re in Carm, throw a few kalamata olives over your greens. If you’re in Dewick, black olives will do, though it pains me to suggest it. (At risk of being parenthetically cumbersome, a quick lesson on the difference between the two: Black olives are picked when they’re green and subsequently soaked in ferrous sulfate/gluconate, which turns them black and leaves them tasting more or less like nothing. Kalamata olives come from the Peloponnese region of Greece, can’t be picked when green, and actually taste good/like an olive.)
Sprinkle some feta cheese over it all.
Top with the Greek salad dressing.
Snag a grilled chicken breast. Back at your table, or somewhere where you’re not in everyone’s way, cut the chicken into small chunks and toss them onto the wrap.
A touch of salt could do nicely.
Fold the bottom of the wrap to where it meets the fillings. Then, tightly fold over one of the sides. Roll it up the rest of the way. It should feel firm and compact in your hand, and the food inside shouldn’t be able to move around too much.
Take a bite. Close your eyes. Pretend you’re in Crete.
If you liked it, stay tuned for next week’s devious concoction. Finally, if you ever want to try one of these recipes, but don’t want to/don’t have the confidence to make it yourself, I’ll happily make you one in exchange for being swiped in. Cheers!

P.S. If any dining staff were offended by my judgments on the grilled chicken, please accept my most sincere apologies. It’s inherently the grilled chicken’s fault, not yours. You guys are great.

(Source: http://tuftsdaily.com/archives/2015/02/01/cut-wrap/)

Chicken Niçoise recipe

An exciting twist on the traditional tuna dish

feathers017.jpg

INGREDIENTS
1 tbsp olive oil | 4 chicken breasts | Sea salt, freshly ground black pepper | 4 eggs | 10 anchovy fillets | ½lb green beans, trimmed, blanched | ½lb yellow beans, trimmed, blanched | ¼ red and yellow peppers, cut in strips | 3 red and yellow teardrop tomatoes, sliced in half | ½ cup Niçoise olives | Low-fat vinaigrette | Sprigs of parsley

for the tapenade

3 anchovies | 1½ garlic cloves | ½ tsp rosemary | Extra virgin olive oil, to cover | 4oz sun-dried tomatoes (chopped) | 4oz Kalamata olives (rough chopped) | for the Potato confit | 1lb new potatoes | Oil to cover | 1 garlic clove, crushed | Small bunch thyme

METHOD
Preheat oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan. Season the chicken breast with salt and pepper. Place the chicken breasts skin side down for 8-10 minutes.
When the skin is crispy, flip the chicken and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Place in the oven for 10-15 minutes depending on the size of the chicken breast. Cook until the juices run clear. Rest for 8 minutes, then slice on an angle.
Bring enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Place the eggs in the boiling water for 6½ minutes. Shock the eggs in an ice bath for 10 minutes.
Peel and cut off the tip of the egg. Season with salt and pepper.
Make the tapenade. In a food processor, purée the anchovies, garlic and rosemary together with a small amount of olive oil to form a smooth paste.
Combine this with the sun-dried tomatoes and olives in a small pan. Cover with olive oil and slowly bring up to temperature. The mixture should not simmer, but should be hot. Once hot, remove from heat and transfer to a container to cool down.
Place the potatoes in a small pan. Cover with oil. Add the thyme and garlic. Cook gently until fork tender.
Strain potatoes and cool on a baking tray. Slice the potatoes in half.
Toss all the ingredients except the chicken, egg and tapenade in a splash of vinaigrette. Season.
Fan the chicken on the plate and place all the other ingredients around the chicken. Garnish with the tapenade, and serve.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

Gerard craft’s orange salad at pastaria

It’s the dead of winter in most of the country, and a salad of sweet, juicy oranges is like sitting in the warmth of the summer sun. Gerard Craft, the five-time James Beard-nominated Best Chef: Midwest, is serving a beautiful Orange Salad tossed with picholine olives, tarragon leaves, red onion and extra virgin olive oil at Pastaria, one of his four St. Louis restaurants (others are Niche, Brasserie by Niche and Taste by Niche).

Pasteria_STL_GRP4309.jpg.rend.sni18col

“I tend to pick things that I would want to eat myself,” he said of this salad based on a classic Italian dish. “It’s so easy to put together, but it’s always kind of a star because it’s really refreshing and really hits a lot of different notes.”

With its bright flavors, this citrus salad would make a perfect light lunch or side dish to a supper of grilled fish or chicken. It’s a dish that fits well with Craft’s lifestyle; he’s an avid runner and biker. He’s not a fan of dieting, but he does try to eat sweets in moderation. “I have to have a couple of tastes of gelato on a given day — it’s part of what makes me happy,” he says. “Exercise helps me keep the balance, both mentally and physically fit. But I don’t think it’s good for your mind to diet. You gotta have tasty food — doesn’t have to be a lot of it.”

Orange Salad | Serves 10

5 large oranges, such as navel oranges, peeled and sliced into ¼-inch thick rounds
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
1/4 cup tarragon leaves, minced
1/2 cup picholine olives, chopped
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt, to taste

Toss all ingredients together, season as needed, and serve immediately.

Andrea Strong is a freelance writer whose work has appeared everywhere from The New York Times to Edible Brooklyn. She’s probably best known as the creator of The Strong Buzz, her food blog about New York City restaurants. She lives in Queens with her two kids, her husband and her big appetite.

More posts from Andrea Strong.

(Source: http://blog.foodnetwork.com)

Go with grapes

Moroccan-spiced chicken and grapes (Serves 4-6)

24272877372 onions, halved and sliced
4 large carrots, peeled, halved and sliced
60ml olive oil
1 kg chicken thighs and legs
45ml Moroccan rub
5ml salt
500g black grapes
200g green olives, pitted

Preheat oven to 180°C.
Combine the onions and carrots with 30ml olive oil in a bowl and toss well. Arrange in an oven pan.
In a separate bowl, pour the remaining oil over the chicken. Rub the Moroccan rub and salt all over the chicken then place on top of the carrots and onions.
Roast for 30 minutes, stirring half way.
Remove and add the grapes and olives. Roast for a further 15-20 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through.

(Source: http://www.iol.co.za)