Deviled Eggs with Olives and Rosemary

Upgrade classic deviled eggs with olives, which also give the dish a health boost: they’re loaded with vitamin E  and you get a lot of good, healthy fats and great flavor.


12 large eggs | 3 tablespoons crème fraîche, plus more if needed | 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard | 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper | 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil | Juice of 1⁄2 lemon | 1/4 cup fresh rosemary leaves | Coarse sea salt to taste | Chopped Halkidiki olives (pitted) to taste | Paprika to taste


1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water.
2. Add the eggs and cook for 8 minutes. Drain the eggs and transfer to the ice water. When cool, peel and cut each egg in half lengthwise. Transfer the yolks to the bowl of a food processor; refrigerate the whites.
3. Add the crème fraîche, mustard, cayenne, olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary, and a pinch of salt to the food processor. Process until smooth, scraping the bowl occasionally. The mixture should be soft enough to pipe through a piping bag, but not too loose. If it’s stiff, pulse in another tablespoon of crème fraîche.
4. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag or resealable plastic bag with a hole snipped in one corner.
5. Arrange the egg whites cut-side up in a single layer on a serving platter. Pipe the yolk mixture into the egg white cavities.
6. Top each with chopped Halkidiki olives.
7. Sprinkle with paprika and serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Baked Cod with Crushed Tomatoes and Green Olives

by Nadine Levy Redzepi


  • Cod, haddock, or scrod fillets – 4 (about 7 ounces/200 g each)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil – 5 tablespoons (75 ml)
  • Plum (Roma) tomatoes – 4
  • Green olives such as Castelventrano – 10
  • Fresh oregano sprigs – 5
  • Fine sea salt
  • Crusty bread such as ciabatta – 2 slices
  • Garlic cloves – 2


1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).

2. Pat the fish dry with paper towels. Slice off the thin side flap from each fillet, saving for another use. Coat the bottom of a baking dish large enough to hold the fish in a single layer with 2 tablespoons of the oil. Place the cod in the dish. Drizzle with another 2 tablespoons of the oil.

  • You want only the thick center portion of each fillet so the fish cooks evenly and doesn’t overcook.

3. To core the tomatoes easily, slice each one downward next to but not through the stem. Make two angled cuts into the larger half to release the core and discard.

4. Squeeze each tomato half over the fish, letting the juice and seeds fall mainly on the fish. Arrange the tomatoes around the fish. Smash each of the green olives under the flat side of your knife and discard the pit. Scatter the olives over the tomatoes. Chop the oregano leaves, discarding the stems, and sprinkle over the fish and vegetables. Season very lightly with salt.

  • You can choose from more delicious olive varieties if you are willing to take the pits out yourself.
  • This technique is so easy and much quicker than using an olive pitter!

5. Tear the bread into small pieces and process into coarse crumbs in a food processor. Pour the crumbs into a medium bowl. Crush the garlic cloves with the flat side of your knife and discard the papery skins. With the machine running, drop the garlic through the feed tube of the processor to mince it. Return half of the crumbs to the processor with the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil and pulse to moisten. Add the remaining bread crumbs and pulse to combine everything. Use a spoon to sprinkle the garlic bread crumbs evenly over the fish and tomatoes.

6. Bake until the topping is golden brown and the fish flakes easily when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes. Serve hot, right from the dish.


Summer bath

Marinated Olives

Marinated Olives

1.5 – 2 c olives of choice, something like Kalamata, Nicoise, Liguria, Amfissa (see here)
1 tbsp sweet pepper flakes
2 tsp dry thyme (if fresh use less)
1.5 tsp dry oregano (if fresh use less)
2 – 3 garlic cloves, smashed with the side of your knife
olive oil, enough to mostly cover the olives

In a large bowl combine all the ingredients and let sit at room temperature for at least 45 minutes before serving.


Deep-fried olives stuffed with creamy Danish feta

Danish Feta_1349462_1092038INGREDIENTS
80g Danish feta
85ml ( cup) cream cheese
Pinch of dried chilli flakes
3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only
Freshly ground black pepper
50 large pitted olives, well drained (the bigger they are, the easier they are to fill)
120g (1 cup) cake flour
3 extra-large eggs, beaten
120g (1 cup) dried breadcrumbs
Oil, for deep-frying

Mix the feta, cream cheese, chilli flakes and thyme until relatively smooth. Season with black pepper. Stuff the olives with this mixture, dust well with flour, dip into beaten egg and then into breadcrumbs.

Heat 3cm oil in a deep frying pan and deep-fry the olives in batches until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel before serving. Makes 50, great for a party snack


Steak with feisty green olive tapenade and garlic mayo

“If you are anything like me, you will smoke out the whole kitchen in the cooking process of this recipe. Fear not, though — the reward is great. All steaks are best when prepped and seasoned simply, cooked quickly and given plenty of time to rest. Do those three things and no amount of smoke will dampen the result. Serve these tasty strips of steak and the indulgent dips with some flatbread and a tangle of watercress.”

by Flora Shedden 


Serves 4 people

2-4 sirloin steaks, about 750g in total | Olive oil | 1 tsp each of black and pink peppercorns, cracked | Watercress, to serve
200g pitted green olives | 1 small green chilli | Juice of ½ lime | 1 tbsp white wine vinegar | 2 tbsp olive oil | 1 small bunch of fresh coriander
2 smoked garlic cloves | 2 tbsp good olive oil | Smoked salt (normal if you can’t find) | 100g mayonnaise

01 Set a griddle pan over a high heat, ready to cook the steaks.

02 Lay out a large sheet of greaseproof paper and drizzle a little oil over half the paper. Sprinkle over some cracked pepper. Place the steaks on top in a single layer,…


Pitting yourself against olive etiquette? Here is the CORRECT way to eat olives with pits

IS THERE a polite way of eating pitted olives without spitting the remains into your hand?



While olive connoisseurs reckon olives with a pit inside are tastier than those without, eating them can prove particularly difficult – especially in front of a crowd.
Most people simply pick the pit out from between their teeth or spit it into their hand, which doesn’t seem too polite. But is this the only way to dispose of it? Or is their a much more glamorous way? Website Olive Central reveals how one should dispose of the pit correctly when eating olives.
Olive Central says there are two scenarios you’ll find yourselves with olives – the first is when they’re served as snacks. The site adds: “To pick them up, use a toothpick if they have been made available, otherwise fingers is fine. Small olives of into your mouth whole, while big olives can be held not he ends with your thumb and forefinger and the flesh bitten off the olive.
“If biting the flesh off the olive, the pit remaining between the two fingers can simply be discarded. When eating the olive whole the pit can be gently spat into your palm or the end of your upright fist.”
Olive-635654“For a slightly more sophisticated version, hold you other handing front of your mouth to hid this spitting activity from view.”
And where should you discard of the pit?
If a bowl has been provided for the pits, they can be put in there, but if not, the side of your own plate is deemed acceptable.Alternatively they can be stored in a paper napkin for later disposal.
The second scenario is when olives form part of a salad. In this scenario, according to Olive Central, table etiquette applies. This means the olive should be put in your mouth using a fork.
The site says: “The easiest way to pick it up is to hold the olive down with your knife and then stab it with your fork. Place the olive in your mouth.
“Tables etiquette suggests that anything thatches out of your mouth should do so the same way it went in. In this case the fork should be used to discard the pit.
“Place one hand in front of your mouth to hide this activity and gently push the pit onto the fork using your tongue.”
But if this forms too much of a challenge for you, you can revert to spitting the pit onto your hand and discarding it.
Again, the other hand should be places in front of your mouth for that added level of sophistication.


Olives and Bone: A Green Osteoporosis Prevention Option

ijerph-logoKok-Yong Chin*  and Soelaiman Ima-Nirwana

Department of Pharmacology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, 56000 Cheras, Malaysia


Skeletal degeneration due to aging, also known as osteoporosis, is a major health problem worldwide. Certain dietary components confer protection to our skeletal system against osteoporosis. Consumption of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols has been shown to improve bone health. This review aims to summarize the current evidence from cellular, animal and human studies on the skeletal protective effects of olives, olive oil and olive polyphenols. Animal studies showed that supplementation of olives, olive oil or olive polyphenols could improve skeletal health assessed via bone mineral density, bone biomechanical strength and bone turnover markers in ovariectomized rats, especially those with inflammation. The beneficial effects of olive oil and olive polyphenols could be attributed to their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. However, variations in the bone protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects between studies were noted. Cellular studies demonstrated that olive polyphenols enhanced proliferation of pre-osteoblasts, differentiation of osteoblasts and decreased the formation of osteoclast-like cells. However, the exact molecular pathways for its bone health promoting effects are yet to be clearly elucidated. Human studies revealed that daily consumption of olive oil could prevent the decline in bone mineral density and improve bone turnover markers. As a conclusion, olives, olive oil and its polyphenols are potential dietary interventions to prevent osteoporosis among the elderly.

(Download full article: pdf)


Lemon and Herb Olives

These are great make ahead appetizers; delicious at room temperature or slightly warm

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.


Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.



Τα νόστιμα αυτά ψωμάκια είναι ωραίος μεζές για ούζο και τσίπουρο, ενώ μπορούν να αντικαταστήσουν και το ψωμί συνοδεύοντας λαδερά φαγητά. Βέβαια, μπορείτε να τις απολαύσετε και με ένα φλιτζάνι τσάι.



Υλικά για τη ζύμη

  • 5 φλιτζάνια αλεύρι για όλες τις χρήσεις
  • 1 φλιτζάνι χυμό πορτοκαλιού
  • ξύσμα από 1 πορτοκάλι
  • 1 φλιτζάνι ελαιόλαδο (ή ½ φλιτζάνι ελαιόλαδο + ½ φλιτζάνι καλαμποκέλαιο)
  • 1 κουτ. γλυκού αλάτι
  • 2 κουτ. γλυκού μπέικιν πάουντερ
  • 1 κουτ. σούπας ζάχαρη

Υλικά για τη γέμιση

  • 2 φλιτζάνια ελιές Χαλκιδικής, χωρίς κουκούτσια
  • 2 κρεμμύδια μεγάλα, ψιλοκομμένα
  • 1/3 φλιτζανιού δυόσμο ψιλοκομμένο (ή 2 κουτ. σούπας αποξηραμένο)
  • 1 φλιτζάνι αμύγδαλα χονδροκομμένα
  • σουσάμι


Ετοιμάζετε τη ζύμη. Σε ένα μπολ ανακατεύετε το αλεύρι με το μπέικιν πάουντερ, το αλάτι και τη ζάχαρη. Προσθέτετε το ξύσμα, το λάδι και το χυμό πορτοκαλιού και ζυμώνετε. Αν χρειαστεί, προσθέτετε λίγο χλιαρό νερό. Η ζύμη πρέπει να είναι σφιχτή και ελαστική. Την πλάθετε μια μπάλα, τη σκεπάζετε με μεμβράνη και την αφήνετε 1 ώρα να «ξεκουραστεί».

Για να ετοιμάσετε τη γέμιση, σε ένα μπολ ανακατεύετε τις ελιές με το κρεμμύδι, τα αμύγδαλα και το δυόσμο.

Προθερμαίνεται τον φούρνο στους 180°C. Σε επίπεδη, αλευρωμένη επιφάνεια ανοίγετε με τον πλάστη τη ζύμη σε χοντρά φύλλα και τα κόβετε σε λωρίδες. Απλώνετε λίγη από τη γέμιση κατά μήκος κάθε λωρίδας και τυλίγετε σε ρολό, σαν φραντζολάκια.

Αραδιάζετε τα ρολά σε λαδωμένο ταψί, τα ραντίζετε με λίγο νερό και τα πασπαλίζετε με σουσάμι. Ψήνετε στον φούρνο για 35 λεπτά περίπου, μέχρι δηλαδή να ροδοκοκκινίσουν οι ελιόπιτες. Τις κόβετε λοξά και τις σερβίρετε.


7 Snacks, die ihr den ganzen Abend essen könnt

Ihr sucht gesunde Alternativen zu Chips, Schokolade, Plätzchen und Co, die ihr abends bedenkenlos naschen könnt? Kein Problem! Von diesen 7 Snacks nehmt ihr definitiv nicht zu.


Grüne und schwarze Oliven

Statt zu Chips oder Nachos mit Käse-Dip solltet ihr besser zu grünen und schwarzen Oliven greifen. Am besten schmecken diese pur oder in Olivenöl. Die Früchte des Ölbaums sind reich an ungesättigten Fettsäuren, Vitamin A, Natrium, Kalcium und Eisen – und sollen sogar vor Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen schützen. Schwarze Oliven weisen etwa 185 Kalorien, grüne Oliven rund 140 Kalorien pro 100 Gramm auf. Zum Vergleich: 100 Gramm Kartoffelchips haben etwa 535 Kalorien.


Eingelegte Gurken

Gurken, die man selbst eingelegt hat, sind ein wunderbar würziger und gesunder Snack für zwischendurch – und noch dazu kalorienarm. Auf 100 Gramm Cornichons kommen lediglich 15 Kalorien, aber auch eingelegte Honiggurken sind mit 70 Kalorien immer noch ein leichter Snack. Dasselbe gilt für Mixed Pickles, bei dem ihr bedenkenlos den ganzen Abend zugreifen könnt.


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Amazing Health Benefits Of Olives

Written by: Bindu Published: Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 2:01 [IST]
olivesforovaries-15-1455537537Olives are one of the most widely enjoyed foods across the globe. Olives are the fruits that come in a wide range of varieties. They are bitter in taste and are highly used in the preparation of salads. Olives are one of the healthiest foods that one can opt for. Even olive oil is known for its wide range of health and beauty benefits. Hence, all in all, this is one fruit that is packed with goodness for the body. The health benefits of olives are numerous. They help eliminate excess cholesterol in the blood, control blood pressure and are a good source of dietary fibres as an alternative for fruits and vegetables. Olives are the greatest sources of vitamin E. This vitamin acts as an antioxidant and protects the cells from free radical damage. Regular consumption of olives reduces the effect of degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and benign diseases. Olives prevent blood clots that can lead to further diseases. They also protect the cell membrane from cancer. Likewise, there are various benefits of consuming olives. Therefore, in this article, we at Boldsky will be listing out some of benefits of consuming olives on a regular basis. Read on to know more about it.

For Cardiovascular Health: Olives have a diverse range of antioxidants that protect the cells from oxidative stress. The antioxidants in them protect the cardiovascular health by neutralising free radicals. The monounsaturated fatty acids present in olives are good for reducing the risk of cardiac diseases.

Cancer Prevention: Olives lower the risk of cancer by providing a rich supply of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. They lower the risk of breast cancer and its re-occurrence.

waist-22-1450760664Weight Loss: Olives assist in weight loss too. Their monounsaturated fatty acids help in weight loss and weight management. According to a research conducted, a diet rich in olives is beneficial in reducing weight.

Digestive Health: Maslinic acid and triterpenoid compound present in the olive skin help fight cancer cells. This acid hampers the growth of colon cancer cells. Since olives are a good source of fibre, they promote the digestion process.
: Olives are a rich source of iron, an essential mineral component of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin carries oxygen from the lungs and transports it throughout the body.


Thanksgiving salad


thanksgiving salad tll 1109MARINATED FETA:
1 pound block feta cheese
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup roughly chopped or torn fresh basil
1/2 teaspoon black pepper 

2 cups sliced fennel (halved lengthwise, cored and thinly sliced lengthwise with a sharp knife)
3/4 cup chopped feathery fennel fronds
1 3/4 cups pitted whole Italian oiled-cured black olives (substitute Kalamata if desired)
8 navel oranges, divided use
6 blood oranges or ruby red grapefruit
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon honey
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Continue reading

Nutrition News: Super-Healthy Olives


Feel Good About Olives

Are olives a food you can feel good about eating? A panel of nutritionists and diet experts polled by Time magazine all say olives make a very healthy snack indeed. They point out that about four large olives have only about 20 calories, are nutritionally rich and contain about two grams of healthy monounsaturated fat, which benefits your heart, your brain and your belly. What’s more, olives are packed with antioxidants like biophenols, which keep bad cholesterol from building up in your artery walls. They’re also anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial, and aid in disease prevention. Plus, as a fermented food, they offer gut-friendly bacteria. One drawback: Because they are cured, olives may be high in salt, so the experts suggest you compensate by cutting out another salty snack. A small price to pay …


Inolivia at World Food Expo Korea 2015

InoliviaKoreaFoodExpoWe, at Inolivia, are pleased to announce the participation and presentation of our products in the World Food Expo Korea 2015. Inolivia olives won positive comments and taste compliments. Korean expo visitors awarded our effort to introduce Inolivia’s pure & rich flavors in the Korean market. Thank you all!