Oliven: So gesund sind die Öl-Früchte

Sie sind ein leckerer Snack und nebenbei ein natürliches Schmerzmittel: Oliven. Was die mediterrane Köstlichkeit in unserem Körper bewirkt, lesen Sie hier.

Sättigende Ballaststoffe, viele gesunde Fettsäuren und eine natürliche Schmerzarznei: All das steckt in Oliven.

Sättigende Ballaststoffe, viele gesunde Fettsäuren und eine natürliche Schmerzarznei: All das steckt in Oliven.

Olivenöl gilt schon lange als Gesundheitselixier. In der Ernährung schützt es Herz und Kreislauf, in der Kosmetik sorgt es für gesunde Haut. Aber wussten Sie schon, wie vielseitig die Olive uns tatsächlich schützt?

Für ein langes Leben: Oliven sind reich an Vitamin E und sekundären Pflanzenstoffen, die die Zellen schützen. Das beugt nicht nur Krebs  vor, sondern hält Geist und Körper zusätzlich bis ins hohe Alter jung und fit.

Natürliches Schmerzmittel: Britische Forscher haben herausgefunden, dass frisch gepresstes Olivenöl ähnlich wirkt wie der Schmerzmittel-­Inhaltsstoff Ibuprofen. Es aktiviert ein Enzym, das Entzündungen hemmt.

Ob grün oder schwarz: Oliven sind kalorienarm und machen gesund

Gegen Depressionen: Hochwertiges Olivenöl senkt dank der enthaltenen ungesättigten Fettsäuren erwiesenermaßen das Risiko, an einer Depression zu erkranken.

Grün oder Schwarz? Schwarze Oliven liefern mehr sekundäre Pflanzenstoffe. Grüne enthalten mehr Wasser und sind kalorienärmer. Doch Vorsicht: Viele vermeintlich schwarze Oliven sind in Wahrheit gefärbte grüne. Dann steht “geschwärzt” auf der Verpackung.

Übrigens: 100 Gramm Oliven enthalten rund 115 Kilokalorien (kcal). Das ist weniger als ein Viertel dessen, was in der gleichen Menge Kartoffelchips steckt!

Mehr lesen: http://www.lifeline.de

한국에서 Inolivia

Southe Korea이제 우리 Inolivia 홈페이지가 한국어로도 안내가 되어 있음을 알려 드립니다. 그래서 한국분들도 이제 한국어로 올리브에 대해서 배우고 우리의 제품을 음미하실 수가 있습니다.

우리 홈페이지 www.inolivia.com  당신을 초대합니다.

Inolivia 마케팅

Chicken pita pockets & Greek salad make for healthy diabetes meal

Bright and bold, a salad for the season

Recipe for Fennel Salad with Oranges and Olives

BY ELLIE KRIEGER, THE WASHINGTON POST

Salad probably is not the first thing that comes to mind when you are planning a winter meal. Cold weather calls for hearty, belly-warming soups, stews and casseroles, of course. But to accompany those stick-to-your-ribs dishes, there is no better match than a salad made with seasonal produce — one that provides crisp, bright contrast and has substance enough to stand up to them.

10799145This salad is a quintessential example, a combination of bold, fresh tastes and colours that come together as a perfect foil for a hot one-pot main course. The thinly sliced fennel at its base is cool and refreshing, but it is not shy like a tender spring lettuce. Rather, it provides a definitive anise flavour and a big crunch that plays off the sweet-tart juicy citrus, one of the season’s produce highlights.

This time of year, oranges are plump and perfect, and there is a remarkable variety to choose from. If you can find them, get blood oranges, whose flesh has a stunning red hue and a generous pucker. Cara Cara navel oranges, a bit sweeter and gloriously pink inside, are also a special treat. If neither of those is available, regular old navel oranges work just as well.

Salty olives and slices of red onion add punches of contrasting flavour, and a citrus vinaigrette ties it all together. Pair this salad with hearty Mediterranean-style stews, soups, bakes and braises, and it will brighten your day as much as the hot dish warms it.

FENNEL SALAD WITH ORANGES AND OLIVES

6 servings

From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.

4 blood oranges (may substitute 3 Cara Cara or other navel oranges)
2 medium fennel bulbs, cored and thinly sliced, plus a few fronds reserved for garnish
1/2 cup pitted black olives, such as Kalamata or Sicilian cured olives, cut in half
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Flavonoids: Are you eating enough berries and onions for healthy aging?

LESLIE BECK – Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014, 2:52 PM EST

If oranges, apples, berries and onions – foods rich in flavonoids – aren’t part of your regular diet, consider adding them to your menu. According to researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, doing so will help you remain healthy, mentally sharp and physically active when you’re older. For women, at least.

he-aging-cranberries03lf1Flavonoids are bioactive compounds found in fruits, vegetables, legumes, tea, chocolate and red wine. The 4,000-plus different flavonoids found in foods can be divided into subclasses; those we most commonly consume include anthocyanins, flavonols, flavones and flavanones.

The many benefits attributed to a flavonoid-rich diet include a lower risk of stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and certain cancers as well as better cognitive performance.

For the study, published last week in the online version of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers set out to determine if women who consumed plenty of flavonoids in their 50s maintained good health and well-being in their 70s. Among 13,818 women, those who consumed the most – versus the least – flavonoids at midlife had significantly greater odds of being a “healthy ager,” even after accounting for diet quality, physical activity, smoking, education and family history.

Women were considered healthy agers if, at aged 70 or older, they were free of major chronic diseases (including cancer, heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, kidney failure, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis) and had no cognitive impairment, physical disabilities or mental-health problems. The remaining women were classified as “usual agers.”

When it came to food sources of flavonoids, a regular intake of oranges and onions (at least five servings a week versus less than one per month) was linked to a greater likelihood of healthy aging. Eating berries at least twice a week compared with less than once was also protective.

As powerful antioxidants, flavonoids do their work in the body by preventing damage caused by free radicals, unstable molecules that can harm cells. Cumulative free radical damage is implicated in aging, memory decline, depression and many chronic diseases.

Flavonoids also decrease inflammation, relax blood vessels and help prevent blood clots that could lead to heart attack or stroke. As well, flavonoids have been shown to activate the brain’s natural house-cleaning process, helping remove toxins and other compounds that can interfere with cognitive function.

A flavonoid-rich diet may help you live more healthily as you age, but other foods are important, too. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, the best sources of antioxidants, has consistently been tied to good health. While many fruits and vegetables deliver flavonoids, many are also excellent sources of other antioxidants such as vitamins C and E and beta-carotene.

Include 7 to 10 servings (combined) in your daily diet. One serving is equivalent to one medium-sized fruit, ½ cup chopped fruit or berries, ¼ cup dried fruit (unsweetened), ½ cup of cooked or raw vegetables, one cup of salad greens or ½ cup of 100-per-cent vegetable or fruit juice. (Limit intake of fruit juice to one serving a day.)

Oily fish, flax and chia seeds, avocado, walnuts, pecans, cashews hazelnuts, olives and olive oil contain healthy fats that dampen inflammation, a major contributor to age-related disease.

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How to choose a good table olive

Featured-Image1Learn these important points on how to choose a good table olive

Olives are one of those unique foods that don’t only taste delicious, but also offer many health benefits. It is however important to learn how to choose a good table olive, since they vary extensively in appearance, flavour and texture.

We asked the South African Olive Industry Association how to choose a good table olive. Here are a few pointers:

How to choose a good olive1. Looks
The first characteristic to take important notice of is of course the appearance of the olive. The olive must always looks physically appealing and it must make you want to eat it immediately. Physical defects are not good.

2. Aroma
Next important point is smell. A good olive will always smell great. The aroma will give a good indication of how the processing was managed as most of the volatile components are a result of the fermentation process. If not fermented, the aroma is usually that of the added ingredients, like garlic, herbs and various other flavourings. An off-fermentation will be noticeable on the nose, and any off-odour is totally unacceptable in quality table olives.

3. Taste
Right so now we get to the taste. As with anything, taste and flavour are very subjective, so we always suggest that newbies to olives start with a blander product, just like they start new wine drinkers with a sweeter wine. Once hooked on these little delicacies, then move onto products with more flavour, the natural olive flavour in particular. A fully fermented table olive should display a balance between the natural flavour of the fruit, the natural lactic acid and the added salt and vinegar.

4. Texture
A good table olive should have a degree of firmness in the flesh, without being tough or woody. The skin should not be too tough and the flesh should detach from the pit quite easily. The texture is determined by many factors, but most importantly is when the olives are harvested and cultivated. The methods of processing play an important role, which can either maintain the texture of the olive or compromise it.

5. Final tip
It’s important to experience as many different styles and flavours as possible and in so doing, build up a profile of the olives you like.

For more information please visit www.saolive.co.za or find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/SaOliveIndustryAssociation 

Inspired sandwich fillings to jazz up your lunch break

Bar lack of time, one of the biggest deterrents to preparing your own packed lunch is not feeling inspired about what you’re making. This doesn’t just apply to lunch: most people will have reached for the takeaway leaflet after quickly surveying the fridge and not being able to stomach yet another omelette.

So, speed and making something a bit different are both key, and while it’s hard to beat a sandwich for lunchtime convenience, the fillings can be predictable. Tuna mayo, BLT, chicken salad … even the newer fillings – falafel salad, which by some law of sandwich-making is always dry – have started to get samey.

d9de5df6-2595-4c51-9dbe-2d00a4319f53-384x720Here are some quick and different filling ideas to jazz up your lunch break and help you find a new favourite. We’ve suggested baguettes, as the frozen home-baked ones are a godsend when you’ve run out of fresh bread. Plus, if you are assembling at home, they are far less likely to go soggy, due to their sturdy crust.

If you are able to do some quick assembly at work, then this could be the egg sandwich for you. Cook 2 eggs in boiling water for exactly 7 minutes then submerge in cold water. Wrap in a clean kitchen towel or put in a container ready to take to work. In one plastic container, combine crumbled feta, chopped green olives and parsley leaves. In another place sliced pickled beets. Come lunchtime, spread a split baguette with mayo, and top with slices of your egg. Season with salt and pepper, then top with beets and the salad.

Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing are authors of The Little Book of Lunch (Square Peg)

(Source: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/feb/22/lunch-box-sandwich-fillings-olives-feta-sardines-liver-pate)

Blistered Eggplant with Tomatoes, Olives and Feta

eggplant-tomatoes-olives-fetaIngredients

  • 1 large eggplant (about 1 3/4 pounds), cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 3/4 pounds mixed tomatoes, small ones halved or quartered, large ones cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 6 ounces feta, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup mixed olives
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • Bread, such as a baguette, for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat broiler with rack 6 inches from heat source. Place eggplant rounds on a wire rack set on a rimmed baking sheet. Broil until eggplant is blistered and deep brown on one side, 10 to 12 minutes. Flip and broil until blistered on other side, 10 to 12 minutes. Immediately transfer to a large bowl, toss with oil, and cover with a plate. Let stand until softened, 10 minutes.
  2. Arrange eggplant and tomatoes on a platter, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper and drizzling with oil before adding next. Top with feta, olives, and parsley, and serve with bread.

Head Over Heels For Olives

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

str2_pxvillage_ev_3Olives are often used for flavoring or garnishing food, while olive oil is often used to cook other foods. However olive is eaten, it has high nutritious value. These black or green nut-shaped fruits have powerful anti-inflammatory properties that can protect you against heart diseases, cancer, and other inflammatory diseases like asthma and arthritis. Studies have also found that when unhealthy fats in one’s diet is replaced (yes, unhealthy fats still need to be eliminated) with healthy olive fats or olive oil, LDL cholesterol levels could drop by 18%. A double-blind-placebo-controlled study also found that extracts of olive leaves helped reduce blood pressure in those with hypertension. Olives are rich in an omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid. A study published in the Annals of Oncology reported that oleic acid found in olive oil can help significantly cut the expression of a breast-cancer-promoting-gene by up to 46%. Studies have also found that diabetic patients who ate meals with olive oil gained better control of their blood sugar than those who ate low-fat meals without olive oil. Beside being an excellent source of healthy fats, olives are also filled with iron, vitamin E, and fiber.

References
[1] Collins, Elise Marie. An A-Z Guide to Healing Foods: A Shopper’s Companion. San Francisco, California: Conari Press, 2009. Print.
[2] Murray, Michael, ND., Pizzorno, Joseph, ND., and Pizzorno, Lara, MA, LMT. The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books, 2005. Print.


Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

(Source: http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/healthonlifesjourney/2014/12/head-over-heels-for-olives.html#ixzz3Tbbmrv5P)

Puttanesca, the healing pasta sauce

It’s called puttanesca, which means the sauce of the ladies of the night. It’s spicy, sharp, intensely flavorful, and very, very good for you. Ingredients include olive oil, tomato sauce, onions, garlic, hot chile peppers, capers, anchovies and olives. In addition to packing a powerful taste punch, it’s exceptionally beneficial, proving the notion that food can also be medicine.

puttanescaLet’s run through this marvel of culinary pharmacology. First of all, you start with olive oil, extra virgin. This is heart-healthy oil, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is the primary killer of adults worldwide. Rich in mono-unsaturated fats, olive oil is a key part of a heart-healthy diet.

Tomato sauce provides the base for a good puttanesca, and it also provides lycopene, a red antioxidant pigment that helps to protect cells overall, and has specific protective benefits for the prostate gland, helping to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

Onions seem common, and often people don’t think about them much. But they are exceptionally good for reducing serum triglycerides, for thinning blood, and for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Onions are highest in the super-antioxidant quercetin, which not only inhibits the aging process, but has anti-cancer properties as well.

Garlic is legendary for keeping vampires away, but its best role is in fighting bacteria. Used as an antibiotic, garlic kills almost every bacteria that can contaminate food. Studies show that garlic also helps to reduce high blood pressure, acting in a manner similar to that of blood pressure medications, by decreasing peripheral vascular resistance.

Hot chile peppers do more than add some zip to a dish. They also act as vasodilators, improving the rate and volume of blood flow, thereby improving nourishment to all parts of the body. Additionally, hot chiles are thermogenic, which means that they burn calories. In fact, hot chiles can help you to burn an average of 20 percent more calories after eating. On top of that, hot chiles cause the brain to produce feel-good endorphins, thus enhancing mood.

Capers, which come from a Mediterranean bush, not only add a bit of salty flavor to the sauce, but also possess anti-cancer properties. Capers help to reduce the risk of ulcers by inhibiting the ulcer-causing H. pylori bacteria, and they additionally improve blood sugar by reducing high blood sugar after a meal. As if that weren’t enough, capers are a traditional remedy for the relief of rheumatic pain, due to their anti-inflammatory action.

Anchovies add a bit of fish flavor and protein to puttanesca sauce, and are also rich in heart-healthy Omega 3 fatty acids. Omega 3’s help the body to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system, improve skin and metabolism, enhance mental health and cognitive function, and are anti-inflammatory, thus reducing the risk of most major chronic degenerative diseases. Mashed up in puttanesca, anchovies add a special tang.

Lastly olives round out puttanesca, providing many of the same cardio benefits as olive oil, in addition to adding flavor and texture.

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How AGE affects our taste in food: We only start liking olives, anchovies and blue cheese in our twenties, survey reveals

Survey: People are 22 on average before they enjoy strong-tasting foods
People start tolerating garlic at 19 but are 28 before they eat goats cheese
Previous research explains we lose taste buds as we get older, meaning we can tolerate stronger and complex tasting food

Sophisticated adults love to dine on olives, blue cheese and anchovies – but many hated these foods as a child. Now, experts have discovered the ‘gastronomic watershed’ – the age at which we start to like ‘grown-up foods’. A survey discovered the average person is aged 22 when they start to appreciate more complex, stronger flavours like goats cheese, chilli sauce and avocado. The research identified 20 foods we are unlikely to enjoy until we hit our late teens and early 20s.

bluecheese

olives stuffed

garlicanchovies

The average person is aged 22 when they start to appreciate more complex, stronger flavours like goats cheese, olives and anchovies, a survey has revealed.

Previously, scientists have theorised our changing tastes are due to how the number of taste buds in our mouths declines with age. Babies are born with innate cravings for sweet things, as our mother’s milk is packed with sugar and fat. Infants have around 30,000 tastebuds in their mouths, so strong tastes will be much more intense for a child. This explains why nursery food is so bland and why children might find strong tasting foods overpowering. By the time we become adults, only a third of these taste buds remain, mostly on our tongues. This explains why we can then tolerate and enjoy stronger tastes.  According the survey, many of us find it difficult to appreciate the taste of strong tasting fish like mackerel during childhood and even throughout our teen years. And mature cheeses fared no better, with most people aged 21 before they appreciated parmesan and aged 22 before they liked to eat blue cheese. Similarly, most people didn’t appreciate a spicy curry until their late teens. Unsurprisingly a host of vegetables featured high up on the list, with spinach and peppers both beginning to appeal to our taste buds at the age of 21. Chilli sauce, gherkins, garlic and horseradish sauce featured in the list of 20 ‘grown-up’ foods, as did kidney beans. But goats cheese proved to be the most disliked childhood flavour, with the average person not fully appreciating it until they hit 28. Other flavours that failed to please our palate during our younger years were olives, which we only begin to enjoy at the ripe old age of 25, and oysters, a taste we acquire at 24. The survey asked 1,950 British adults about which foods they hated as a child but now find delicious.

Overall the stats show that despite the majority of us finally embracing the full range of tastes and flavours by the time we reach our 20s, there are likely to still be two foods on average we still refuse to eat as adults. The research also revealed that school meals play a major part in helping us form early opinions of foods and tastes we then form an opinion of through life. The data showed one in three adults has eaten food they didn’t like for fear of upsetting the host. More than one in ten have done so during a meal at the in-laws, while business lunches and dinners with friends or close family have also led to people having to ‘grin and bear it’. The most common situation in which we begin to enjoy a food we disliked in the past is during meals with friends. Trying new foods on holiday and meeting someone who has a broader knowledge of foods and flavours were also given as reasons. Nutritional Therapist Karen Poole explained: ‘Our relationship with food develops at a very early age and can affect how we eat and what we eat throughout our lifetime. ‘Our tastebuds are the initial way we learn to recognise food as either friend or foe and bitter or strong foods can often be a warning to leave well alone, and later on determine what we like and what we are happy to avoid. ‘Biologically, as we age, the rate of renewal and regeneration of our tastebuds slows down and the overall number is reduced and this may also influence our reaction to certain foods and make stronger tastes more interesting and enjoyable. ‘Its natural as we grow up to broaden our horizons across many fields so there are many external factors also that contribute to people becoming more adventurous at these particular ages’. The survey was carried out by Butterkist.

(Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

Easy Valentine’s Day recipe: Heart-Shaped Savoury Bruschetta

Published Wednesday, Feb 11 2015, 17:35 GMT  |  By

Whether you’re taken and want to spoil your loved one, or fancy hosting a Valentine’s get together for your besties, these cute heart-shaped bruschettas are perfect for the occasion.

This super speedy method involves cutting bread into heart shapes, which are grilled in the oven before being topped with a yummy blend of tomatoes, cheese and olives. Fresh and packed with favour, these savoury treats will go down a storm with those special people in your life.

Valentine's bruschetta

© Primula

Ingredients

  • Slices of thick white or brown bread
  • 80g Primula Cheese with chives
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 300g fresh plum tomatoes
  • 2 Spring onions – peeled and finely sliced
  • 50g black olives – finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil – finely chopped
  • Salt & black pepper
  • 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Garnish : fresh basil leaves

Method

1 Cut the bread into 12 heart shaped slices.
2 Brush one side of each heart with the olive oil and place oiled side up under a preheated hot grill until golden brown. Allow to cool.
3 In the meantime, skin the plum tomatoes by cutting a small cross in the base of each tomato and place them into a bowl. Pour boiling water over the tomatoes to cover them and leave to blanch for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon take the tomatoes out of the hot water, allow to cool. When cool enough to handle, gently peel off the tomato skins.
4 Cut out the stem base and cut into quarters, squeeze out the juice and the seeds and chop the tomatoes into ¼” dice. Drain on kitchen paper.
5 Place the chopped tomatoes, chopped olives, sliced spring onions and chopped Basil into a mixing bowl and season well.
6 Cut the garlic clove in half and rub garlic on to each slice of toasted baguette, then pipe each slice with the cheese around the edge of the bread. Lay the slices on to a serving dish.
7 Spoon the tomato mixture on to the slices and garnish with extra Basil leaves.

(Source: http://www.reveal.co.uk)

Chicken Niçoise recipe

An exciting twist on the traditional tuna dish

feathers017.jpg

INGREDIENTS
1 tbsp olive oil | 4 chicken breasts | Sea salt, freshly ground black pepper | 4 eggs | 10 anchovy fillets | ½lb green beans, trimmed, blanched | ½lb yellow beans, trimmed, blanched | ¼ red and yellow peppers, cut in strips | 3 red and yellow teardrop tomatoes, sliced in half | ½ cup Niçoise olives | Low-fat vinaigrette | Sprigs of parsley

for the tapenade

3 anchovies | 1½ garlic cloves | ½ tsp rosemary | Extra virgin olive oil, to cover | 4oz sun-dried tomatoes (chopped) | 4oz Kalamata olives (rough chopped) | for the Potato confit | 1lb new potatoes | Oil to cover | 1 garlic clove, crushed | Small bunch thyme

METHOD
Preheat oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan. Season the chicken breast with salt and pepper. Place the chicken breasts skin side down for 8-10 minutes.
When the skin is crispy, flip the chicken and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Place in the oven for 10-15 minutes depending on the size of the chicken breast. Cook until the juices run clear. Rest for 8 minutes, then slice on an angle.
Bring enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Place the eggs in the boiling water for 6½ minutes. Shock the eggs in an ice bath for 10 minutes.
Peel and cut off the tip of the egg. Season with salt and pepper.
Make the tapenade. In a food processor, purée the anchovies, garlic and rosemary together with a small amount of olive oil to form a smooth paste.
Combine this with the sun-dried tomatoes and olives in a small pan. Cover with olive oil and slowly bring up to temperature. The mixture should not simmer, but should be hot. Once hot, remove from heat and transfer to a container to cool down.
Place the potatoes in a small pan. Cover with oil. Add the thyme and garlic. Cook gently until fork tender.
Strain potatoes and cool on a baking tray. Slice the potatoes in half.
Toss all the ingredients except the chicken, egg and tapenade in a splash of vinaigrette. Season.
Fan the chicken on the plate and place all the other ingredients around the chicken. Garnish with the tapenade, and serve.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

Roast vegetable, haloumi and rice salad

This hearty roast vegetable, haloumi and rice salad tastes equally good warm or at room temperature

991590-jan9_taste 

Ingredients:

  •  2 cups brown medium grain rice
  •  1L Campbell’s Real Stock Vegetable
  •  1 large eggplant, halved lengthways, cut into 2cm thick slices
  •  2 zucchini, thickly sliced
  •  1 red capsicum, cut into chunks
  •  5 garlic cloves, sliced
  •  1/2 cup fresh oregano
  •  1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  •  1 lemon
  •  3/4 cup pitted Sicilian olives or Chalkidiki
  •  250g haloumi, sliced
Step 1 :Place rice and stock in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil over high heat then reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 25 minutes or until cooked and stock has been absorbed. Remove from heat and stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff up rice with a fork.
Step 2: Meanwhile, preheat oven to 220C (200C fan-forced). Place eggplant, zucchini, capsicum, 2 sliced garlic cloves and ¼ cup oregano on a large oven tray. Drizzle with half the oil, season and toss to coat. Roast for 30 minutes or until tender.
Step 3: Toss rice and roasted vegetables in a large bowl and arrange on a platter.
Step 4: Peel rind from lemon in large strips. Juice the lemon.
Step 5: Heat remaining oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Cook rind, olives and remaining garlic and oregano, stirring for 3-4 minutes or until garlic is golden. Set aside with a slotted spoon. Cook haloumi in same pan over medium-high heat for 1-2 minutes each side or until golden. Return olive mixture to pan with lemon juice and swirl pan to coat. Top rice salad with haloumi mixture, making sure you pour the pan juice evenly over the rice.
Originally published on taste.com.au

Antipasto platter

By Madiha Hamid – Published: January 15, 2015

37Method

For the dressing:

•  Mix all the ingredients and whisk them lightly.
•  Keep tasting the mixture every few minutes to check for sourness or sweetness. The dressing should be tangy in taste.
•  Adjust the mixture by adding sugar or honey.

For the vegetables:

•  Marinate the sliced vegetables in the dressing for about an hour or so. Allow them to sit in the refrigerator for the juice to sink in.
•  Sprinkle the veggies with oregano and fresh parsley for added taste.

On the side

•  Cut some pita bread into small, triangular pieces and toast it.
•  Add a small bowl of hummus or salsa sauce to dip the vegetables in.

The concept of antipasti

Antipasto (plural: antipasti) is the Italian name given to the foods offered before a main meal — an appetiser, if you will. This is a delightful way to set the stage for the coming feast and invite family and friends to the dinner table. The presentation of antipasti — the different colours, artful composition, varied tastes and the care taken in its presentation  — serve as reminders for guests that it is time for relaxation, pleasure and indulgence.
According to Italian tradition, the ingredients of antipasti are selected on the basis of colour, flavour and how well they complement one another and the main course. A typical antipasti platter includes olives, pepperoni, anchovies, mushrooms, artichokes, cured meats, pickles, different cheeses and vegetable slices dipped in oil or vinegar. It can be served hot or cold, in bite-size plates or as elegant centrepieces from which everyone is served. In Italy, the most common antipasto dish includes a simple display of cured meats like salami or mortadella slices along with hard cheeses garnished with olives, onions, peppers or sun-dried tomatoes.
The Italians generally save antipasti for special occasions and big parties and celebrations. In Milan, enjoying an aperitif (alcoholic drinks served before a meal) has become a sort of institution. The Milanese consider drinking wine while nibbling on some potato chips, olives and peanuts an hour before the main course an essential for the good life. In fact, it would be unthinkable for the Milanese to start a dinner without an aperitif!.

Winter vegetables for antipasti?

Indulge in your favourite cured meats and cheeses, served with a mix of the best vegetables and fruits the winter season has to offer. These include:

(Source: http://tribune.com.pk/story/818737/antipasto-platter/)

Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour

Bonnie Stern | January 16, 2015 | Last Updated: Jan 16 3:52 PM ET

SICILIAN CAPONATA
This Sicilian cooked vegetable salad gets its flavour from the combination of vegetables and the sweet and sour mixture of sugar amd vinegar. We learned a version of this at Maria Grammatico’s La Scuola de Cucina in Trapani. Serve as a salad, a side dish or a sauce for pasta.

stern1

Peter J. Thompson/National Post Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour.

-1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil or more
-2 lbs round Sicilian eggplants, or regular eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes with skin
-4 ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
-16 cippoline onions, peeled and halved or quartered
-1 cup puréed San Marzano tomatoes (freeze the rest and use in soups or sauces)
-1/2 cup each black and green olives, pitted
-2 tbsp capers, rinsed
-2 tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar
-2 tbsp sugar
-kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
-1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1. Heat oil in a large deep skillet on medium-high. Add eggplant, in batches if necessary, and cook 10 to 15 minutes until browned. Remove eggplant to a large bowl. Add more oil to the pan if necessary.
2. Add celery to pan and cook 5 to 6 minutes until partially tender and golden brown. Add to the eggplant.
3. Add onions to pan and cook 10 to 15 minutes until tender and browned. Add celery and eggplant back to pan along with tomato purée, black and green olives and capers. Add 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Cook gently 10 minutes.
4. Bring vinegar and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan. Stir into vegetables. Cook a few minutes.
5. Add parsley and cool. Season to taste. Serve at room temperature.
Makes approximately 6 cups

(Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/16/bonnie-stern-my-souvenirs-of-sicily-include-these-six-savoury-and-sweet-recipes-i-brought-home/)

Blood oranges with fennel, watercress, olives and burrata recipe

Make the most of the short blood-orange season with this vibrant salad that uses flesh and juice to maximum effect.
blood-orange-salad_3158739b
Assemble at the last minute, before the dressing stains the burrata and fennel too much.
SERVES 6
INGREDIENTS
For the dressing:
6 tbsp blood-orange juice (basically the juice of 1 or 2 blood oranges)
1 tbsp pomegranate molasses
2 tsp runny honey
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil (fruity rather than grassy)
For the salad:
5 blood oranges
1 large fennel bulb
125g (4½oz) watercress, coarser stems removed
about 30 top-quality black olives
2 x 200g (7oz) tubs burrata, or good-quality mozzarella
extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling

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Lamb Chops with Aubergine, Feta and Anchovies

SCA_14-01-2015_OUR_MORETON_BAY_04_lamb chops_t620INGREDIENTS:
1 tbs pesto, zest and juice of 1 lemon, 2 cloves garlic, 8 lamb loin chops, fat removed
Salad: ¼ cup olive oil, 1 eggplant cut into 5mm slices, 250g cherry tomatoes, 150g green beans cut in half and blanched, 150g feta, ½ cup black olives, 4 anchovies, chopped, ¼ cup basil leaves, 1 tbs olive oil, 1 tbs balsamic vinegar, salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

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Roasted Vegetable Salad With Olives and Cheese

635566601426725714-phxdc5-61j5qx1o6nb3k3wq7hf-original¾ cup olive oil | ¼ cup balsamic vinegar | 1 large red onion, cut into ¾-inch-thick rounds | 12 baby beets, stems trimmed to 1 inch, peeled, halved lengthwise | 3 small zucchini, each cut lengthwise into 4 slices | 1 small eggplant, diced into 1-inch pieces | 2 large red bell peppers, cut into 2-inch-wide strips | 6 slices country-style French bread | Additional olive oil | 10 cups mixed baby greens | 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil | 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives or green onions | 1 tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram | ¾ cup chilled fresh mild goat cheese (such as Montrachet), crumbled (about 3 ounces) | ½ cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese (about 2 ounces) | ¾ cup brine-cured black olives (such as kalamata)

Heat grill on medium-high heat. Whisk ¾ cup oil and vinegar in medium bowl until well-blended. Place onion, beets, zucchini, eggplants and red bell pepper on baking sheet. Brush both sides with some of the vinaigrette. Sprinkle vegetables with salt and pepper. Grill vegetables until just cooked through, about 10 minutes per side for beets, 6 minutes per side for onion and 4 minutes per side for zucchini, eggplant and peppers. Remove the vegetables according to individual cooking requirements. Vegetables can be grilled 1 hour ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Brush bread with additional olive oil; sprinkle with pepper. Grill bread until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes per side.

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spaghetti with fresh tomato, olives & tuna

INGREDIENTS
  • h300_w300_m5_bwhite375 g packet spaghetti
  • 425 g can tuna in springwater, drained, flaked
  • 3 tomatoes, diced
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/3 cup pitted kalamata olives, thinly sliced
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 long red chilli, seeded, finely chopped
  • 1 lemon, juice
  • 80 g low-fat fetta, crumbled
  • salad, to serve
PREPARATION
  • 1Cook spaghetti in a large pan of boiling, salted water, according to packet instructions. Drain well and return to pan.
  • 2Toss remaining ingredients, except fetta, through pasta. Season to taste.
  • 3Serve pasta sprinkled with feta. Accompany with salad, if desired.
NOTES
  • This would also be delicious with pan-fried prawns instead of tuna.

(Source: http://www.msn.com)