Steak with feisty green olive tapenade and garlic mayo

“If you are anything like me, you will smoke out the whole kitchen in the cooking process of this recipe. Fear not, though — the reward is great. All steaks are best when prepped and seasoned simply, cooked quickly and given plenty of time to rest. Do those three things and no amount of smoke will dampen the result. Serve these tasty strips of steak and the indulgent dips with some flatbread and a tangle of watercress.”

by Flora Shedden 

stealw.olivetapenade

Serves 4 people

INGREDIENTS
2-4 sirloin steaks, about 750g in total | Olive oil | 1 tsp each of black and pink peppercorns, cracked | Watercress, to serve
FOR THE TAPENADE
200g pitted green olives | 1 small green chilli | Juice of ½ lime | 1 tbsp white wine vinegar | 2 tbsp olive oil | 1 small bunch of fresh coriander
FOR THE GARLIC MAYO
2 smoked garlic cloves | 2 tbsp good olive oil | Smoked salt (normal if you can’t find) | 100g mayonnaise

01 Set a griddle pan over a high heat, ready to cook the steaks.

02 Lay out a large sheet of greaseproof paper and drizzle a little oil over half the paper. Sprinkle over some cracked pepper. Place the steaks on top in a single layer,…

 

6 Lebensmittel, die nicht halten, was sie versprechen

Schwarze Oliven

Bei schwarzen Oliven handelt es sich nicht immer um natürlich gereifte Oliven. Oft werden grüne Oliven einfach nur schwarz eingefärbt. Das muss bei loser Ware oder in der Gastronomie allerdings kenntlich gemacht werden. Auf verpackten Oliven darf dieser Hinweis jedoch fehlen. Wer es ganz genau wissen will, schaut am besten in die Zutatenliste: Eisen-II-Gluconat (E579) und Eisen-II-Lactat (E585) deuten auf dieses Verfahren hin.

wasabiWasabi

Ihr denkt, dass in Wasabi automatisch auch echter japanischer Meerrettich steckt? Dann liegt ihr (in den meisten Fällen) falsch. Wilder Wasabi wächst nur in Japan und ist äußerst anspruchsvoll. Aus diesem Grund kostet das Gewürz auch zwischen 150 und 200 Euro pro Kilo. Die im Supermarkt erhältlichen Wasabi-Nüsse oder Erbsen enthalten zwischen 0,003 und 2 Prozent des Originalprodukts.

Aufgrund der schlechten Verfügbarkeit und des Preises wird wilder Wasabi (Hon Wasabi) oft mit westlichem Wasabi (Seiyo Wasabi), ein Meerrettich-Senf-Gemisch, ersetzt. Der Unterschied: Hon Wasabi ist mintgrün, Seiyo Wasabi froschgrün.

Weiße Schokolade

Weiße Schokolade ist eigentlich überhaupt keine Schokolade. Wenn man sich die Zutatenliste anschaut, wird der weißen Schokolade das Kakaopulver und die Kakaomasse entzogen – die für normale Schoko unabdingbar sind. Zur eigentlichen Herstellung wird lediglich Kakaobutter, Zucker und Milch verwendet. Genau gesagt, dürfte sich diese Nascherei also nicht Schokolade nennen. Wir finden: Mit dieser Mogelverpackung können wir leben.

(Source: http://www.brigitte.de)

Black olive and lemon paté

A fabulous quartet of flavours – the richness of the cream cheese is cut through with the acidity of lemon and the earthy tang of olives.

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Serves 4
100g olives, pitted
250g cream cheese
Juice of 1 lemon
Black pepper

1 Add the pitted olives to a blender and blend until almost smooth.

2 Transfer the olive mix to a fine sieve and sit it over a bowl to drain any excess liquid – around 5 minutes should do it. However, if your olives were in liquid it might take a little longer.

3 Next, add the cream cheese to a mixing bowl with the olives, lemon juice and black pepper. Carefully fold together until incorporated.

4 Place a round pastry cutter in the centre of a serving plate, add the paté and tamp down. Remove the ring and serve with some dressed leaves and hot toast.
Andrew Dargue, vanillablack.co.uk

(Source: https://www.theguardian.com)

Antipasto platter

By Madiha Hamid – Published: January 15, 2015

37Method

For the dressing:

•  Mix all the ingredients and whisk them lightly.
•  Keep tasting the mixture every few minutes to check for sourness or sweetness. The dressing should be tangy in taste.
•  Adjust the mixture by adding sugar or honey.

For the vegetables:

•  Marinate the sliced vegetables in the dressing for about an hour or so. Allow them to sit in the refrigerator for the juice to sink in.
•  Sprinkle the veggies with oregano and fresh parsley for added taste.

On the side

•  Cut some pita bread into small, triangular pieces and toast it.
•  Add a small bowl of hummus or salsa sauce to dip the vegetables in.

The concept of antipasti

Antipasto (plural: antipasti) is the Italian name given to the foods offered before a main meal — an appetiser, if you will. This is a delightful way to set the stage for the coming feast and invite family and friends to the dinner table. The presentation of antipasti — the different colours, artful composition, varied tastes and the care taken in its presentation  — serve as reminders for guests that it is time for relaxation, pleasure and indulgence.
According to Italian tradition, the ingredients of antipasti are selected on the basis of colour, flavour and how well they complement one another and the main course. A typical antipasti platter includes olives, pepperoni, anchovies, mushrooms, artichokes, cured meats, pickles, different cheeses and vegetable slices dipped in oil or vinegar. It can be served hot or cold, in bite-size plates or as elegant centrepieces from which everyone is served. In Italy, the most common antipasto dish includes a simple display of cured meats like salami or mortadella slices along with hard cheeses garnished with olives, onions, peppers or sun-dried tomatoes.
The Italians generally save antipasti for special occasions and big parties and celebrations. In Milan, enjoying an aperitif (alcoholic drinks served before a meal) has become a sort of institution. The Milanese consider drinking wine while nibbling on some potato chips, olives and peanuts an hour before the main course an essential for the good life. In fact, it would be unthinkable for the Milanese to start a dinner without an aperitif!.

Winter vegetables for antipasti?

Indulge in your favourite cured meats and cheeses, served with a mix of the best vegetables and fruits the winter season has to offer. These include:

(Source: http://tribune.com.pk/story/818737/antipasto-platter/)

Olive Pate with Yogurt and Thyme

ntip-pasta-elias-giaourti-thumariIngredients
16 small Cretan barley rusks
40 olives Throumpes Cretan or Chalkidiki
2 tbsp. Yogurt Organic
1 tbsp. Olive oil
coarse salt
fresh pepper
thyme

Method
Pit the olives and put them in the blender.
Add the Yogurt , thyme, olive oil, salt, pepper and beat until homogeneous.
Put some dips in each barley rusks, add a little more thyme and …
Bon appetit … !!!

Try this recipe with Inolivia – Chalkidiki Green Olives

Olive, Basil and Almond Tapenade

Description This recipe is adapted from “My Paris Kitchen” by David Lebowitz (Ten Speed Press, 2014). Recipe tested by Linda Mutschler Read more A festive menu for a tree-trimming party Makes 8 to 10 servings

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Ingredients:

2 cups pitted green olives
½ cup untoasted almonds
1 small clove garlic
Juice of ½ lemon
1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and squeezed dry
½ cup loosely packed basil leaves
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt to taste
Crackers or bread slices to serve
______________________________________________________________

Preparation:

Put the olives, almonds, garlic, lemon juice and capers in the bowl of a food processor. Coarsely chop the basil leaves, add them to the food processor, and pulse the machine a few times to start breaking them down. Add olive oil and a sprinkle of salt. Pulse the food processor until mixture forms a coarse paste but still has texture.

Transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve with crackers or bread.

(Source: http://www.jsonline.com)

20-prix-pharmacie

Patricia Chuey: Make your sandwich sensational

With quality bread and delicious, nutritious fillings, they don’t have to be just for lunch

The sandwich is believed to have originated in the 1700s. While playing cards, the Earl of Sandwich, John Montagu, became so engrossed in his game that he couldn’t pull himself away for dinner. To eat during the game without a mess, he requested that his meat be served between two slices of bread. This new style of eating meat and bread together became so popular that it was named the “sandwich” in honour of the earl.10219737

Some people love sandwiches; entire restaurant chains thrive on the concept. Others have had their fill and quit sandwiches forever when grade school ended. Sandwiches can be good, bad or ugly in terms of taste and nutritional value. A carefully constructed sandwich can be as satisfying and nourishing as a slow-cooked meal and bring variety to the dinner routine.

To make a dinner-worthy sandwich, choose whole-grain bread or a fibre-rich gluten-free version, a whole grain pita, tortilla or even lettuce leaves. Pair it with a protein such as nut butter, chickpea or other bean spread, eggs, fish, turkey or lean meat. Then, load on the vegetables or plan a tasty vegetable side — or do both. Whether a chicken pesto panino, smashed chickpeas and avocado on sasquatch loaf or the ideas here, have fun creating and naming a specialty sandwich for your family.

Grilled Chicken, Roasted Red Pepper and Olive Tapenade Sandwich

Serves 4

1/2 cup green or black pitted olives | 1 clove garlic, minced | 1/2 Tbsp olive oil | 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice | 2 tsps capers | 8 slices of multi-grain rye or quality bread | 500 g cooked, sliced grilled chicken | 1 cup fresh or roasted red bell pepper slices

Make tapenade: In a food processor or blender, combine olives, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice and capers and mix to a coarse paste.

Toast the bread. Spread on the tapenade and top with chicken and roasted red peppers. Serve accompanied with A Side of Green Beans.

Per serving (varies based on type of bread): 387 calories, 26 g carbohydrate, 5 g fibre, 490 mg sodium, 8.5 g fat, 38 g protein

(Source: http://www.theprovince.com)cost-of–without-insurance

Olive Tapenade and Mushroom Bruschetta

Olive-Tapenade-and-Mushroom

…The Chili Cheese Toast, which was recommended to us, was strictly okay: the green olives and green bell pepper did add to the flavour. But the Olive Tapenade and Mushroom Bruschetta is a delight. Loaded on the bruschetta, moist and bursting with flavours, it was devoured.

(Source: http://www.mid-day.com)

Olive Tapenade with green & black olives

I find this tapenade to be very addicting! I like to eat it with a neutral tasting cracker, such as Blue Diamond Nut-Thins and Le Pain de fleurs Buckwheat Crispbread are also really good.
127-olive-tapenade
Olive Tapenade with green & black olives
Low-FODMAP, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free
makes about 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients
1 can (dr. wt. 6 oz.) pitted, whole black olives, drained
1 can (dr. wt. 6 oz.) pitted, whole green olives, drained
2 tablespoons drained capers
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon garlic oil (try my quick or oven-roasted recipes)
1 1/2 teaspoons anchovy paste
3 large, fresh basil leaves (or 1/2 teaspoon dried)

Directions
Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender. Whirl until it forms a smooth paste (about 1 minute in a food processor). You can serve this at room temp but I actually like to eat it chilled. Serve with crackers or as a sandwich spread. Store any leftovers in the fridge.

(Source: http://www.deliciousasitlooks.com)