Educational Games for Olive and Olive Oil

“In the areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, people have not been living alone. For thousands of years, they have been living together with a different kind of population, a population that constantly grows and expands over the plains, the slopes and the mountains of the hinterland of the Mediterranean countries. This is the population of the olive trees,” as we learn from the back cover of a new book, On the Olive Routes by Nikos Michelakis, Angela Malmou, Anaya Sarpaki, and George Fragiadakis.

OliveGames and Routes

Above there is a series of educational games and digital books created under the Project of Raising Youth Awareness for Olive and Olive Oil from Association of Cretan Olive Municipalities in cooperation with the International Olive Council (http://www.olivegames.gr/).

(Source: http://www.oliveoiltimes.com)

Ελιόπιτες

Τα νόστιμα αυτά ψωμάκια είναι ωραίος μεζές για ούζο και τσίπουρο, ενώ μπορούν να αντικαταστήσουν και το ψωμί συνοδεύοντας λαδερά φαγητά. Βέβαια, μπορείτε να τις απολαύσετε και με ένα φλιτζάνι τσάι.

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ΣΥΝΤΑΓΗ: 

Υλικά για τη ζύμη

  • 5 φλιτζάνια αλεύρι για όλες τις χρήσεις
  • 1 φλιτζάνι χυμό πορτοκαλιού
  • ξύσμα από 1 πορτοκάλι
  • 1 φλιτζάνι ελαιόλαδο (ή ½ φλιτζάνι ελαιόλαδο + ½ φλιτζάνι καλαμποκέλαιο)
  • 1 κουτ. γλυκού αλάτι
  • 2 κουτ. γλυκού μπέικιν πάουντερ
  • 1 κουτ. σούπας ζάχαρη

Υλικά για τη γέμιση

  • 2 φλιτζάνια ελιές Χαλκιδικής, χωρίς κουκούτσια
  • 2 κρεμμύδια μεγάλα, ψιλοκομμένα
  • 1/3 φλιτζανιού δυόσμο ψιλοκομμένο (ή 2 κουτ. σούπας αποξηραμένο)
  • 1 φλιτζάνι αμύγδαλα χονδροκομμένα
  • σουσάμι

Διαδικασία

Ετοιμάζετε τη ζύμη. Σε ένα μπολ ανακατεύετε το αλεύρι με το μπέικιν πάουντερ, το αλάτι και τη ζάχαρη. Προσθέτετε το ξύσμα, το λάδι και το χυμό πορτοκαλιού και ζυμώνετε. Αν χρειαστεί, προσθέτετε λίγο χλιαρό νερό. Η ζύμη πρέπει να είναι σφιχτή και ελαστική. Την πλάθετε μια μπάλα, τη σκεπάζετε με μεμβράνη και την αφήνετε 1 ώρα να «ξεκουραστεί».

Για να ετοιμάσετε τη γέμιση, σε ένα μπολ ανακατεύετε τις ελιές με το κρεμμύδι, τα αμύγδαλα και το δυόσμο.

Προθερμαίνεται τον φούρνο στους 180°C. Σε επίπεδη, αλευρωμένη επιφάνεια ανοίγετε με τον πλάστη τη ζύμη σε χοντρά φύλλα και τα κόβετε σε λωρίδες. Απλώνετε λίγη από τη γέμιση κατά μήκος κάθε λωρίδας και τυλίγετε σε ρολό, σαν φραντζολάκια.

Αραδιάζετε τα ρολά σε λαδωμένο ταψί, τα ραντίζετε με λίγο νερό και τα πασπαλίζετε με σουσάμι. Ψήνετε στον φούρνο για 35 λεπτά περίπου, μέχρι δηλαδή να ροδοκοκκινίσουν οι ελιόπιτες. Τις κόβετε λοξά και τις σερβίρετε.

(Source: http://www.olivemagazine.gr)

Chicken pita pockets & Greek salad make for healthy diabetes meal

Slow-cooked Greek Easter lamb with lemons, olives & bay

This authentic dish of meltingly tender leg of lamb is roasted with garlic, lemon and potatoes for an irresistible Sunday lunch centerpiece.

slow-cooked-greek-easter-lamb-with-lemons-olives-bay

Ingredients

  • 1 garlic bulb, separated into cloves, half peeled and sliced, half unpeeled
  • 8-10 fresh bay leaves
  • 3 lemons, cut into quarters lengthways
  • 2½ kg leg of lamb
  • 50ml Greek extra virgin olive oil, plus 4 tbsp for the potatoes
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1kg Cypriot potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways (if you can’t find these, any large, waxy variety is fine – try Desirée)
  • 140g Greek Chalkidiki olives (or other large pitted green olives)
  • 125ml red or dry white wine

Method

  1. Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Arrange the unpeeled garlic cloves, 3 bay leaves and the lemon quarters in a large roasting dish and cover with 200ml cold water. Sit the lamb on top, drizzle with the olive oil and rub it in all over.
  2. Using a small sharp knife, cut small incisions in the lamb skin, then tuck the remaining peeled and sliced garlic and bay leaves into these slits.
  3. Season the lamb well and sprinkle over the cinnamon. Cover tightly with foil and place in the oven. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Leave to cook for 4 hrs, skimming the fat from the juices and removing the foil for the final 30 mins of cooking.
  4. After 1 hr, put the potato wedges in a large roasting tin, coat them in 4 tbsp olive oil and season well. Roast in the oven with the lamb for 11/2-2 hrs.
  5. Transfer the cooked lamb to a large piece of foil, wrap tightly and leave to rest for 20-30 mins. Check the potatoes are cooked (if you need to, turn the oven up to 220C/200C fan/gas 7 to finish cooking). Add the olives and wine to the pan juices, simmer them and keep warm until ready to carve. Serve the lamb thickly sliced with the olives, potatoes and Tahini & lemon sauce (see ‘goes well with’), with the meat juices poured over at the last minute.

Chicken Niçoise recipe

An exciting twist on the traditional tuna dish

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INGREDIENTS
1 tbsp olive oil | 4 chicken breasts | Sea salt, freshly ground black pepper | 4 eggs | 10 anchovy fillets | ½lb green beans, trimmed, blanched | ½lb yellow beans, trimmed, blanched | ¼ red and yellow peppers, cut in strips | 3 red and yellow teardrop tomatoes, sliced in half | ½ cup Niçoise olives | Low-fat vinaigrette | Sprigs of parsley

for the tapenade

3 anchovies | 1½ garlic cloves | ½ tsp rosemary | Extra virgin olive oil, to cover | 4oz sun-dried tomatoes (chopped) | 4oz Kalamata olives (rough chopped) | for the Potato confit | 1lb new potatoes | Oil to cover | 1 garlic clove, crushed | Small bunch thyme

METHOD
Preheat oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan. Season the chicken breast with salt and pepper. Place the chicken breasts skin side down for 8-10 minutes.
When the skin is crispy, flip the chicken and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Place in the oven for 10-15 minutes depending on the size of the chicken breast. Cook until the juices run clear. Rest for 8 minutes, then slice on an angle.
Bring enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Place the eggs in the boiling water for 6½ minutes. Shock the eggs in an ice bath for 10 minutes.
Peel and cut off the tip of the egg. Season with salt and pepper.
Make the tapenade. In a food processor, purée the anchovies, garlic and rosemary together with a small amount of olive oil to form a smooth paste.
Combine this with the sun-dried tomatoes and olives in a small pan. Cover with olive oil and slowly bring up to temperature. The mixture should not simmer, but should be hot. Once hot, remove from heat and transfer to a container to cool down.
Place the potatoes in a small pan. Cover with oil. Add the thyme and garlic. Cook gently until fork tender.
Strain potatoes and cool on a baking tray. Slice the potatoes in half.
Toss all the ingredients except the chicken, egg and tapenade in a splash of vinaigrette. Season.
Fan the chicken on the plate and place all the other ingredients around the chicken. Garnish with the tapenade, and serve.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

Linguine with swordfish and olives

INGREDIENTS

16bb593f992107536b77302246b8185b2295073263-1409814400-54080f80-360x2511 large onion, chopped
120ml extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, crushed
5g chilli, chopped
60g green olives
200g fresh swordfish, diced
½ glass white wine
12 cherry tomatoes
4 tbsps chopped basil
2 tbsps chopped parsley
2 tbsps chopped coriander
400g linguine

METHOD

Sauté the onion slices in a frying pan with a little extra virgin olive oil until these turn slightly soft. Add the garlic, chilli, olives and the swordfish and sauté for one minute. Then add the white wine and cook until all the wine is absorbed. Add the cherry tomatoes, half the basil, parsley and coriander and allow to simmer for five minutes.

Cook the pasta in boiling water. Take a tablespoon of the pasta water and add it to the sauce, add a pinch of salt and cover. Drain the pasta and transfer to the pan over low heat.

Mix the pasta in the sauce and simmer for a few minutes. Add more fresh herbs, but keep some aside to garnish.

Serve the pasta on warm plates, garnish with the remaining herbs and drizzle some herb oil.

Joe Vella is an Executive chef, Hilton Malta.

(Source: http://www.timesofmalta.com)

Savory Chocolate-Olive Cookies

By  | August 20, 2014

Best served as an appetizer or snack, these delicate cookies shine their brightest when paired with an equally salty olive-infused hummus on the side. Don’t be afraid to really drive the theme home with a robust tapenade. An intense dark chocolate can stand up to anything you throw at it. The saying really is true; chocolate goes with everything, or perhaps more accurately, everything goes with chocolate.

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Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 Cup Non-Dairy Margarine
  • 1/4 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Cups All Purpose Flour
  • 2 Tablespoons Cornstarch
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Dried Tarragon
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 Cup Oil-Cured Olives, Pitted and Chopped
  • 2.5 Ounces 90% Cacao Dark Chocolate, Chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

Continue reading

5 reasons why eating olives is a must

Almost everyone loves olives be it on your favourite pizza, sandwich or salad. Not only do they taste good but are loaded with a number of health benefits.

Here are a few reasons as to why olives are a must in your diet regularly:

  • olive-smallOlives are a rich source of vitamin E and monounsaturated fatty acids, which help reduce risk of heart disease by lowering blood press and LDL cholesterol.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties and hence helps in easing pain.
  • Loaded with fatty acids and antioxidants, olives are an excellent food for your hair and skin.
  • Eating olives help boost haemoglobin level in the body as it is a rich source of iron.
  • Eating a cup of olives can help regulate blood pressure.

(Source: http://zeenews.india.com)

Fair time: How about a deep-fried olive on a stick?

The lakes area’s own Helmer family were noted in this month’s Better Homes and Gardens to mark the arrival of state fair season, also known as food-on-a-stick season. The Helmers will be back at the Minnesota State Fair with their deep-fried olives, which won best new food chosen by WCCO television, last year.The queen green olives are stuffed with cream cheese and deep fried in a special seasoned batter. Carol Helmer said many people didn’t realize the olive was a fruit.

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The Helmer family has worked in the concession business for more than 20 years. Fred and Carol Helmer had a retail store providing frozen foods before they moved into the concession business. Their deep-fried fruit was years in the making to perfect the right mix and taste. Then the Helmers were faced with the daunting task of being accepted as a concession stand by the fair.

They applied for 14 years before they were finally accepted in 2007.

They had a brightly colored concession trailer custom made for them and developed an entire list of fruit snacks on a stick. Their idea for fried and fresh fruit brought a new element to fair foods.

They said the idea for fried fruit came when their daughter Alison, then age 14, dropped her lunch of grapes into batter and deep fried them.

Grapes, strawberries, pineapple, banana, apples and peaches are all on the list to be placed in a sweet batter and deep fried. Carol Helmer described the result as a warm pie on a stick. Toppings include powdered sugar, cinnamon with sugar or chocolate. They expanded the menu to include fruit smoothies with or without ice cream and fresh fruit bowls, and then added a fruity salsa served cinnamon and sugar chips.

Fried Fruit on-a-Stick is near the State Fair Grandstand. Working the fair continues to be a family affair for the Helmers.

 

 

 

Dirty Martini, with fried blue cheese stuffed green olives and honey

A number of chefs at independent or small chain restaurants are also innovating with salt and sweet as a way to add interest and increase sales at the bar.
TAMO_dirty-martini_600
At Tamo Bistro & Bar at the Seaport Hotel in Boston, chef Robert Tobin accidentally created the Dirty Martini, a salty and sweet combo of fried blue cheese stuffed olives served with honey harvested from the hotel’s rooftop beehives. Initially, Tobin was just making the fried blue cheese stuffed olives, but after a first taste he thought they were too salty. He tried several variations in cheese, olives and crust, but nothing solved the problem. Then, while making a spicy-and-sweet dip, Tobin tried some honey and knew it was a perfect solution.

Continue reading

In Praise of the Olive

Olive-tree communication‘‘… the fruit of the olive tree is a great boon for everything needed in life…’’
S O L O N
Athenian lawgiver, 640 – 560 B.C.

Since antiquity the olive tree has a permanent presence in the landscape of Greece, in the daily life and habits of its people. The culture of the olive tree and its products deeply influenced the civilization of ancient and modern Greeks, and has played an important role not only in the Greek economy, but in all the aspects of Greek civilization, historical, folkloric, traditional, medicinal and artistic.
During older times had been by mistake claimed that its cultivation was transferred in Greece from Palestine. New elements from an analysis of pollen gives evidence for the olive trees presence on the Hellenic space since the Neolithic era. Systematic cultivation of olive trees has been certified during the Minoan period in different places in Greece.
Furthermore, the small plates of Linear A and B from the palaces of Knossos, Pylos and Mycenae testify its economic importance during 14th & 13th centuries B.C. Ancient vessels from Crete with olives and olive-kernels, the depiction from 16th century B.C. of an olive grove at the Cretan Knossos Palace, the traces of oleaster and the fossilized leaves found on the island of Aegean, Santorini – dating back some 50,000 / 60,000 years, the golden glasses with the anaglyph olive-trees from the 16th B.C. Mycenean tomb of Vafi in Sparta-Laconia, the planted by the mythical hero Hercules olive tree in the holy location of Olympia, the mythological tradition of Athena’s and Poseidon’s conflict for the name of Athens city and the offer of olive tree / symbol of reconciliation and peace, against the horse / symbol of war, and the salty water/symbol of sea, the golden holy olive tree of Apollo in Delos, the crowned by olive-branch statue of Zeus in Olympia – a Feidias’ sculpture, the Panathenaic amphorae with the cultivation of olive trees, leave no doubt as to the role of the olive in ancient Greece, and that the present day perceptions of the olive are profoundly shaped by the ancient past. Continue reading

Olive Tapenade with green & black olives

I find this tapenade to be very addicting! I like to eat it with a neutral tasting cracker, such as Blue Diamond Nut-Thins and Le Pain de fleurs Buckwheat Crispbread are also really good.
127-olive-tapenade
Olive Tapenade with green & black olives
Low-FODMAP, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free
makes about 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients
1 can (dr. wt. 6 oz.) pitted, whole black olives, drained
1 can (dr. wt. 6 oz.) pitted, whole green olives, drained
2 tablespoons drained capers
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon garlic oil (try my quick or oven-roasted recipes)
1 1/2 teaspoons anchovy paste
3 large, fresh basil leaves (or 1/2 teaspoon dried)

Directions
Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender. Whirl until it forms a smooth paste (about 1 minute in a food processor). You can serve this at room temp but I actually like to eat it chilled. Serve with crackers or as a sandwich spread. Store any leftovers in the fridge.

(Source: http://www.deliciousasitlooks.com)

Warm Citrus Olives with Rosemary and Garlic

Don’t weekends go way too fast? After a long week at work, I completely look forward to Friday night. It is the beginning of the weekend. In addition we have our Friday night tradition of wine and appetizers. Our Friday night this week was filled with friends and great cheeses. DSC01532
Our dear friend brought a very special bottle of wine to celebrate Friday night. It was a bottle I have never had before and now has become a new favorite. Seven Stones Winery sits east of St. Helena. Ronald and Anita Wornick didn’t take long after they purchased 45 acres for their family estate, to take on the exceptional task of creating some of the best wine. They only produce 400 cases, and dedicate to a single varietal –Cabernet Sauvignon.DSC01512

As quoted on their website – “Seven Stones is comprised of just under three acres of vines and a winery on the Wornick family estate in St. Helena. From small, meticulously cultivated vineyard parcels, we produce a limited amount of some of Napa Valley’s most sought after Cabernet Sauvignon.”DSC01507 Continue reading

Olive oil ice cream recipe

olive-oil-ice-crea_2985678bMAKES 1.2 litres (2 pints)

INREDIENTS
875ml (1½ pints) full-fat milk
250ml (9fl oz) double cream
220g (8oz) caster sugar
10 egg yolks
½ tsp vanilla extract
good pinch sea-salt flakes, plus more to serve
75ml (2¾fl oz) extra-virgin olive oil (a fruity one), plus more to serve

METHOD
Begin by setting a bowl in a sink of ice-cold water.

Continue reading

Warm Spicy Citrus Castelvetrano Olives | Friday Night Bites

When I am at , nine times out of ten, I make my way to the olive bar.  They house one of the best selections in the Bay Area of olives without having to venture to a specialty shop in San Francisco.  One of my absolute favorites is the Castelvetrano Olive.  It is grown exclusively in western Sicily among the Belice river valley, near the town of Castelvetrano.  The prime time for harvesting is the beginning of October through mid November.  DSC02515

Contrary to popular belief, this olive is not actually cured, but goes through a similar process as to the California style black ripe olives.  The olive is washed in lye, or caustic soda for up to 12 hours.  It takes the bitterness out of the olive and then it is continually washed in fresh water to remove the lye.  Then it is either refrigerated or canned.  This process produces an intense green color and sweet flavor profile.   A great pairing to this beautiful olive is parmesan-reggiano, mozzarella, marcona almonds and Genoa salami.

I wanted to create a quick recipe that was packed with flavor we could enjoy for our Friday Night Bites.  Hubby doesn’t like anything with a pit or bones, so luckily Whole Foods had the pitted version of the Castelvetrano olive.  The idea of serving warm olives with garlic, citrus, spicy red pepper and fresh thyme simply resonated with me.  The flavor combination was simply divine, fresh and a perfect little bite.  I actually serve with a small fork so you can get the different bits of flavor in one bite.  The zest of the orange and lightly toasted slice of garlic with a fleck of spicy red pepper was a wonderful treat for my mouth. If you want to kick up your olives and impress your guests, this is the recipe for you!

Warm Spicy Citrus Castelvetrano Olives

DSC025002 Cups Castelvetrano Olives

6 Garlic Cloves, peeled and sliced thin

1/3 Cup Olive Oil

Zest of one Orange

1 Tablespoon Fresh Thyme Leaves

¼ teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes

In a medium skillet, add the olive oil and olives and heat on medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes.  Add the red pepper flakes and garlic and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes.  Be careful not to have the heat too high or the garlic will burn.  Right before serving, add the orange zest and thyme leaves and toss.  Serve in a bowl and enjoy!

(Source: http://authenticsuburbangourmet.blogspot.gr)-def50

Sofrito Zucchini pasta with Beans and lightly fried Plantains

This bowl of zucchini pasta with sofrito sauce is so easy to make and packed with flavor and smells that’ll sneak up your nose and put a smile on your face. It’s satisfying, interesting, and much different than a traditional Italian pasta sauce. Unlike a traditional Italian tomato sauce, sofrito is made of yellow onions and red and green peppers. I tossed in some chopped manzanilla olives for saltiness and spiced it up with smoked paprika and gave it a delectable aroma with some chopped cilantro.

Sofrito-Zucchini-Pasta-With-Beans-and-Lightly-Fried-Plantains-934x800
Oh, and the plantains. I really tried my hardest not to fry the plantains, but I couldn’t resist. I only used a half tablespoon of olive oil, so I call that “lightly fried.” I chose plantains that were green but ripe and soft, so they were slightly sweet. Once fried in the olive oil with some salt and pepper, their sugars popped through and when topped on the savory and spiced zucchini pasta, they tasted fantastic.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 green plantain
  • 2 half-tablespoons of olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1/4 cup chopped yellow onion
  • 3 tbsp chopped red bell pepper
  • 3 tbsp chopped green bell pepper
  • 2 round red tomatoes, chopped (or 1/2 a 14-oz can of diced tomatoes)
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 3 tbsp chopped manzanillo olives or Chalkidiki green olives
  • 1 heaping tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 1.5 medium zucchinis, spiralized
  • 1/3 cup pink beans or beans of choice

Continue reading

Roast string beans for an unexpected burst of flavour

We’re used to seeing green string beans as a side dish, but the white variety is often forgotten. Similar in taste and texture, I like changing it up with this uncommon pick.

These beans are filled with antioxidants and can be stored for at least a week if unwashed and placed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper. Roasting the beans along with the garlic, tomatoes and black olives gives you a true Mediterranean feel. Great as a side dish or salad on its own.beans

Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 425 F. Line two baking sheets with foil and lightly coat with cooking spray.
2. 
Place the garlic cloves and tomatoes on one of the foil-covered baking sheets. Place the string beans on the other sheet. Spray both sheets of vegetables with vegetable oil.
Bake for 10 minutes, then remove the tomatoes. Continue baking for another 10 minutes until the beans are slightly browned and the garlic is soft. Carefully squeeze out the garlic cloves. Continue reading

7 Easy Summer Recipes

David Leite is the publisher of the James Beard Award-winning website  and the author of The New Portuguese Table cookbook.

I don’t know about your home, but there’s a very handsome hammock in our backyard, strung between two trees, looking to all the world like a giant smile. And The One and I would very much like to spend the better part of the month in it, which is why these 7 easy summer recipes are worthy of your printer. (Now if only I could find a way to move the kitchen closer to the hammock. Time to call Contractor Dan.)rigatoni-artichokes-olives

1. Rigatoni with Artichokes, Garlic, and Olives What would summer be without pasta, I ask you? And this rigatoni recipe (pictured above) is packed with high-octane flavors. Besides artichokes, garlic, and olives, you’ll also find orange zest, rosemary, and a bit of butter. And Fatty Daddy here would never be caught melting over a pot of boiling water in August heat with guests nipping at his heels, and neither should you. What I love about this is you can make the pasta ahead of time: Cook as directed, drain it, toss it lightly with olive oil, dump it into a zip-top bag, and chuck it in the fridge. When dinnertime rolls around, whip up your sauce and add the cold pasta to the pan and stir until heated through.

2. Cantaloupe Soup with Prosciutto-Mozzarella Sandwiches  Let’s face it. There aren’t a ton of recipes that come together in minutes and have sass and surprise to spare. But this cantaloupe soup is an exception. The ingredients list: cantelopes, mint, salt, and pepper. That’s it. On the side, a gussied-up ham and cheese sammie. Boo-yah!

3. Lobster Salad Okay, before you start squirming around the kitchen howling like Woody Allen in “Annie Hall,” you don’t have perform crustacean murder to make this recipe.  Most markets will either cook your lobsters for you or have the meat already cleaned and packaged. Just ask.  Either way, you’ll love the combination of chunks of lobster, lightly dressed with mayonnaise, red onion, and basil, and the cherry tomato salad.  And the best thing for all you low-carb and/or Paleo folks, there’s nary a top-split roll in sight.

4. Tomato and Green Bean Salad Fresh, fresh, fresh. That’s what comes to mind when I think of this tomato salad. It’s called Tomatosalata me Fasolakia in Greek. Toss in toasted chunks of day-old bread that are brushed with extra-virgin olive oil, and you’ve got yourself a Greek version of the Italian favorite panzanella. And here’s a fun idea: Grab a copy of “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” throw pillows around the family room for atmosphere, and invite your guests to lounge while supping on their salad. Serve grilled lamb chops as a main course and somepastelli (sesame, pistachio, and honey candy) as a sweet finish.

5. Smoky Gazpacho Sorry for two tomato recipes, but it is August, after all. Because this gazpacho, rich with smoky flavor–not from smoked paprika, as many think–but from tomatoes, cucumber, bell pepper, onion, and garlic that are lightly smoked on the grill, was such a favorite of my recipe testers, I’d be strung and quartered if I didn’t include it. Serve it room temp or just slightly chilled so as not to mute the smokiness of the dish. And this concludes the tomato portion of our program. We now return to our regularly scheduled recipes.

6. Parmesan-Crusted Chicken This one’s for the kids–no matter their age. It’s a simple dip (in egg white), flip (in Parmesan cheese), and bake (in the oven) recipe. And what I like about it, besides how quick it is to make, is that it’s not first slathered with mayonnaise before being coating with cheese. Not that I have anything against mayo, mind you, but I’d rather pull it out for the aforementioned lobster salad.

7. Thai Grilled Pork If you’re like me, you just roll your eyes at any summer recipe with more than a handful of ingredients. And when I think Thai, I think bigshopping lists. But not with these little lovely pork skewers. They’re a cinch to put together. The marinade, made with cilantro root (more on that in a minute), garlic, fish sauce, soy sauce, sugar, and coconut cream, is what gives the pork flavor and keeps it moist.  This recipe plays nicely with a green papaya salad and sticky rice. If you can get cilantro with its roots still attached, just wash, scrape, and finely chop it. If not, plain ole cilantro leaves will do.

(Source: http://parade.condenast.com)

 

 

Great colours and flavours salad


Mixed Tomato Salad with Cucumber & Olives

Tom salad1A bright and colourful cornucopia of mixed summer vine ripened and cherry tomatoes, this vibrant Mixed Tomato Salad with Cucumber and Olives is delicious as it spectacular. Tossed with diced English or Persian cucumber, tangy Kalamata olives, crunchy red onion, a handful of fresh herbs and dressed with a simple oil and vinegar or homemade vinaigrette, this light and refreshing Mediterranean-style salad celebrates the richness of summer’s bounty. Garnish with fresh feta, crumbled goat cheese, creamy Buffalo mozzarella or large curls of shaved pecorino for an extra blast of flavour and texture.

Mixed Tomato Salad with Cucumber & Olives (Serves 8-10)

Tom salad2
4 red hot house tomatoes
4 yellow hot house tomatoes
2 cups red, yellow and orange cherry tomatoes, halved
1 english cucumber, quartered and sliced 
1/4 cup diced red onion
1/2 cup pitted, sliced Kalamata olives
1/4 cup mixed herbs, such as cilantro, chives and basil
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tbsp dried Greek oregano
Maldon salt and fresh ground black pepper

tom salad3In a large bowl toss to combine the tomatoes, cucumbers, red onion, olives and herbs and drizzle with olive oil and red wine vinegar. Arrange the dressed salad on a large platter and garnish with Greek oregano, Maldon salt and black pepper to taste.

(Source: http://scrumpdillyicious.blogspot.gr)