Nutrition News: Super-Healthy Olives

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Feel Good About Olives

Are olives a food you can feel good about eating? A panel of nutritionists and diet experts polled by Time magazine all say olives make a very healthy snack indeed. They point out that about four large olives have only about 20 calories, are nutritionally rich and contain about two grams of healthy monounsaturated fat, which benefits your heart, your brain and your belly. What’s more, olives are packed with antioxidants like biophenols, which keep bad cholesterol from building up in your artery walls. They’re also anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial, and aid in disease prevention. Plus, as a fermented food, they offer gut-friendly bacteria. One drawback: Because they are cured, olives may be high in salt, so the experts suggest you compensate by cutting out another salty snack. A small price to pay …

(Source: http://blog.foodnetwork.com)

Inspired sandwich fillings to jazz up your lunch break

Bar lack of time, one of the biggest deterrents to preparing your own packed lunch is not feeling inspired about what you’re making. This doesn’t just apply to lunch: most people will have reached for the takeaway leaflet after quickly surveying the fridge and not being able to stomach yet another omelette.

So, speed and making something a bit different are both key, and while it’s hard to beat a sandwich for lunchtime convenience, the fillings can be predictable. Tuna mayo, BLT, chicken salad … even the newer fillings – falafel salad, which by some law of sandwich-making is always dry – have started to get samey.

d9de5df6-2595-4c51-9dbe-2d00a4319f53-384x720Here are some quick and different filling ideas to jazz up your lunch break and help you find a new favourite. We’ve suggested baguettes, as the frozen home-baked ones are a godsend when you’ve run out of fresh bread. Plus, if you are assembling at home, they are far less likely to go soggy, due to their sturdy crust.

If you are able to do some quick assembly at work, then this could be the egg sandwich for you. Cook 2 eggs in boiling water for exactly 7 minutes then submerge in cold water. Wrap in a clean kitchen towel or put in a container ready to take to work. In one plastic container, combine crumbled feta, chopped green olives and parsley leaves. In another place sliced pickled beets. Come lunchtime, spread a split baguette with mayo, and top with slices of your egg. Season with salt and pepper, then top with beets and the salad.

Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing are authors of The Little Book of Lunch (Square Peg)

(Source: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/feb/22/lunch-box-sandwich-fillings-olives-feta-sardines-liver-pate)

Slow-cooked Greek Easter lamb with lemons, olives & bay

This authentic dish of meltingly tender leg of lamb is roasted with garlic, lemon and potatoes for an irresistible Sunday lunch centerpiece.

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Ingredients

  • 1 garlic bulb, separated into cloves, half peeled and sliced, half unpeeled
  • 8-10 fresh bay leaves
  • 3 lemons, cut into quarters lengthways
  • 2½ kg leg of lamb
  • 50ml Greek extra virgin olive oil, plus 4 tbsp for the potatoes
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1kg Cypriot potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways (if you can’t find these, any large, waxy variety is fine – try Desirée)
  • 140g Greek Chalkidiki olives (or other large pitted green olives)
  • 125ml red or dry white wine

Method

  1. Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Arrange the unpeeled garlic cloves, 3 bay leaves and the lemon quarters in a large roasting dish and cover with 200ml cold water. Sit the lamb on top, drizzle with the olive oil and rub it in all over.
  2. Using a small sharp knife, cut small incisions in the lamb skin, then tuck the remaining peeled and sliced garlic and bay leaves into these slits.
  3. Season the lamb well and sprinkle over the cinnamon. Cover tightly with foil and place in the oven. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Leave to cook for 4 hrs, skimming the fat from the juices and removing the foil for the final 30 mins of cooking.
  4. After 1 hr, put the potato wedges in a large roasting tin, coat them in 4 tbsp olive oil and season well. Roast in the oven with the lamb for 11/2-2 hrs.
  5. Transfer the cooked lamb to a large piece of foil, wrap tightly and leave to rest for 20-30 mins. Check the potatoes are cooked (if you need to, turn the oven up to 220C/200C fan/gas 7 to finish cooking). Add the olives and wine to the pan juices, simmer them and keep warm until ready to carve. Serve the lamb thickly sliced with the olives, potatoes and Tahini & lemon sauce (see ‘goes well with’), with the meat juices poured over at the last minute.

Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour

Bonnie Stern | January 16, 2015 | Last Updated: Jan 16 3:52 PM ET

SICILIAN CAPONATA
This Sicilian cooked vegetable salad gets its flavour from the combination of vegetables and the sweet and sour mixture of sugar amd vinegar. We learned a version of this at Maria Grammatico’s La Scuola de Cucina in Trapani. Serve as a salad, a side dish or a sauce for pasta.

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Peter J. Thompson/National Post Sicilian caponata: proof that veggie dishes can have plenty of depth of flavour.

-1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil or more
-2 lbs round Sicilian eggplants, or regular eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes with skin
-4 ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
-16 cippoline onions, peeled and halved or quartered
-1 cup puréed San Marzano tomatoes (freeze the rest and use in soups or sauces)
-1/2 cup each black and green olives, pitted
-2 tbsp capers, rinsed
-2 tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar
-2 tbsp sugar
-kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
-1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1. Heat oil in a large deep skillet on medium-high. Add eggplant, in batches if necessary, and cook 10 to 15 minutes until browned. Remove eggplant to a large bowl. Add more oil to the pan if necessary.
2. Add celery to pan and cook 5 to 6 minutes until partially tender and golden brown. Add to the eggplant.
3. Add onions to pan and cook 10 to 15 minutes until tender and browned. Add celery and eggplant back to pan along with tomato purée, black and green olives and capers. Add 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Cook gently 10 minutes.
4. Bring vinegar and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan. Stir into vegetables. Cook a few minutes.
5. Add parsley and cool. Season to taste. Serve at room temperature.
Makes approximately 6 cups

(Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/16/bonnie-stern-my-souvenirs-of-sicily-include-these-six-savoury-and-sweet-recipes-i-brought-home/)

Olives can enliven a host of dishes

Citrus-Marinated Olives

Take these olives along on your next picnic.

ingredients

  • 1035981 1/2 cups Kalamata olives or other brine-cured black olives
  • 1 1/2 cups cracked brine-cured green olives (Try Inolivia)
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 6 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange peel
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper

preparation

Combine all ingredients in large heavy-duty resealable plastic bag. Shake bag to blend ingredients. Refrigerate at least 1 day and up to 3 days, turning bag occasionally. Transfer olives and some marinade to bowl. Let stand 1 hour at room temperature before serving.

(Source: http://www.epicurious.com)

Olive oil about to get a lot more expensive

NEW YORK, Dec 7 — New research from Harvard University suggests it could put years on your life.

But a Mediterranean diet rich in pungent olive oil does not come cheap, and it is just about to get a lot more expensive. Disastrous olive harvests in much of southern Europe have sent wholesale prices shooting up, meaning consumers around the world are going to have to get used to paying substantially more for a culinary staple prized equally by gourmets and physicians. Nowhere has the impact of freakish summer weather been felt more painfully than in Tuscany and Umbria, where the subtly aromatic, extra-virgin oils reaped from timeless landscapes provide the industry’s global benchmark for quality. In Spain, which last year accounted for half the world’s production of all grades of olive oil, a toxic cocktail of scorching temperatures, drought and bacteria is expected to halve output this year.

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A silent press

A different bacteria threatens to decimate olive groves in southern Italy. In the heartland of poshly-packaged oils that connoisseurs discuss like fine wines, it was a humble fly that wreaked havoc after being handed optimal breeding conditions by the erratic climate. At Fiesole, in the heart of Tuscany’s “Chiantishire”—so called because of its rich British ex-patriots—Cesare Buonamici’s olive processing facilities should be whirring at full capacity. Instead, thanks to the olive fly, the sophisticated presses and extraction machines lie dormant for lack of the organically-cultivated fruit that would normally keep them busy until nearly Christmas. “Our production has been halved,” the former engineer says gloomily. Figures from the International Olive Council suggest wholesale prices of Italian oil have risen 37 per cent from 2013, but Buonamici warns the rise for top quality oils like his will be steeper. “Those are the prices ex-press,” he told AFPTV. “For the final consumer the increase is likely to be more than 60 per cent.”

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Braised chicken with olives and pine nuts

Chicken joints braised in white wine, with a lively garlic and orange-zest finish

This is Sicilian inspired and can be sweet-sour (in which case add the raisins) or simply savoury (in which case leave them out). Apart from a quick browning on the stove top, this dish really looks after itself. (Serves 4)

INGREDIENTS
Braised_chicken_wi_3098301b1½ tbsp olive oil
8 chicken thighs, or a chicken jointed into 8 pieces
3 medium red onions, peeled and cut into half-moon-shaped wedges about 1cm (½in) thick at the widest part
2 celery sticks, trimmed and diced
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 small dried chillis, crumbled
500g (1lb 2oz) baby waxy potatoes, halved
250ml (9fl oz) white wine
finely grated zest of ½ orange, plus juice of 1
75g (2¾oz) raisins, soaked in boiling water for half an hour, then drained (optional)
2 tbsp capers, rinsed
75g (2¾oz) green olives
30g (1oz) pine nuts, toasted

for the gremolata
2 garlic cloves
zest of 1 small orange, removed in strips (cut away any bitter white pith)
leaves from about 10 stems of mint, torn

METHOD
Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4.Heat the olive oil in a wide oven-proof sauté pan or shallow casserole (large enough to hold the chicken in a single layer – or use two) and brown the chicken on both sides, seasoning as you go. You are just trying to get a good colour, not cook the chicken through. Remove the joints to a dish as they’re ready.

Pour off all but 1 tbsp of oil from the pan and add the onions. Cook over a medium heat to colour, then add the celery, cooking for two minutes before adding the garlic and chilli. Cook for a further minute, add the potatoes and toss them around, then add the wine, orange juice and zest, and the raisins (if using). Put the chicken back (plus any juices that have run out of it), skin-side up in a single layer. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat to a simmer. Season well and transfer to the oven for 40 minutes.

Add the capers and olives 15 minutes before the end of the cooking time, stirring them in around the chicken joints. The cooking juices will have reduced, the potatoes should be tender and the chicken will be cooked through.

Meanwhile make the gremolata by chopping the garlic and orange zest finely, then mix with the mint. Toss this over the chicken with the toasted pine nuts just before serving. A big watercress salad is all you need on the side – everything else is in the pan.

(Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk)

All about olives

Olives add flavor to dishes, especially holiday appetizers

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6 high fat foods you should be eating

WHETHER we’re trying to lose weight or just avoid gaining it, many of us think steering clear of dietary fat is the first step. Rather than cut out all fat, however, we’d be better served if we focused on what types of fat we’re getting.

The body needs some fat — just not too much. Fat gives your body energy, keeps your skin and hair healthy, helps you absorb certain vitamins and even keeps you warm, among other responsibilities.

A diet high in saturated fat — found in animal products and some vegetable oils — can lead to heart problems, but eating the right amount of unsaturated fats can protect the heart.

Unsaturated fats — including monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — are considered good-for-you fats. Polyunsaturated fats include the famed omega 3 and omega 6 fats, both considered essential fatty acids, because our bodies can’t make them on its own. Polyunsaturated fats can help lower total cholesterol, while monounsaturated fats can raise “good” cholesterol, or HDL, and lower “bad” cholesterol, or LDL.

The average adult should get about 20 to 35 per cent of their daily calories from fat and less than 10 per cent of their daily calories from saturated fats. A gram of fat contains nine calories, so a daily diet comprised of 2000 calories would even out to about 44 to 78 grams of total fat a day.

So where can you find these unsaturated fats? Look no further than the six healthy picks below.

Olives (And Olive Oil)

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Mixing 10 large olives into your next salad will add about 5 grams of fat, 3.5 of which are monounsaturated and .4 of which are polyunsaturated.

Not an olive fan? The oil is an even more concentrated source of healthy fats — just don’t be too heavy-handed on your pour: A single tablespoon contains over 13 grams of fat, nearly 10 of which are monounsaturated and about 1.5 are polyunsaturated.

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Scallop and Olive Eyeball Mousse

Looks like eyeballs tastes like fish, need we say more? Though might sound like a DIY bush tucker trial, this canapé is deceptively delicious and will kick the sophistication of your no doubt zombie-themed soiree up a notch or two.

Ingredients

  • Scallops500g sea scallops / 2 large egg whites / 85 g double cream / 1 tsp salt / 1 tsp white pepper / 250 g pitted green olives or pimento- stuffed olives / 1 garlic clove, crushed / 100 g mayonnaise / 1/2 tsp smoked paprika / 1 tsp fresh lemon juice / 80 ml extra-virgin olive oil / 10 slices white bread / 4 tbsp unsalted butter / 2 tbsp black olives, diced

Method

  1. In a food processor, combine the scallops, egg whites, salt and white pepper and blend until smooth.
  2. With the machine on, add the cream in a thin stream.
  3. Scrape the puree into a bowl and refrigerate until chilled, about 30 minutes.
  4. Tear four 12-inch sheets of cling film.
  5. Spoon 1/4 of the puree onto each sheet in a 6-inch square.
  6. Slide the green olives lengthwise onto four 6-inch wooden skewers.
  7. Lay one skewer down in the center of each square.
  8. Roll the puree around the olives skewers and tightly roll up the cling film to form cylinders; twist the ends and secure with twist ties.
  9. Wrap each cylinder in another sheet of cling film and refrigerate until chilled, about 30 minutes.
  10. Bring a large, deep frying pan of water to a simmer.
  11. Add the cylinders, cover with an inverted heatproof plate to keep them submerged and poach over moderately low heat until firm, 15 to 20 minutes.
  12. Let cool, then refrigerate until completely chilled.
  13. Crush the garlic with a pinch of salt in a medium mixing bowl.
  14. Whisk in the mayonnaise, paprika and lemon juice, then whisk in the olive oil in a thin stream.
  15. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees (gas mark four).
  16. Brush the bread on both sides with the melted butter.
  17. Using a 2-inch round cutter, stamp out as many rounds as possible from the bread.
  18. Transfer the rounds to a baking sheet and toast until golden, about 15 minutes.
  19. Unwrap the cylinders and remove the skewers.
  20. Using a sharp knife, cut the cylinders into slices about inch thick.
  21. Place a piece of black olive in the center of each green olive.
  22. If desired, use a slightly smaller round cutter to stamp the mousse slices into perfect rounds.
  23. Spoon the sauce onto the toasts, top with the mousse rounds and serve.

(Source: http://sosogay.co.uk)

Citrus Salad

Ingredients

12 baresane olives – 12 cerignola olives – 1 Tbsp bomba calabrese – 1/2 cup olive oil, divided – 2 navel oranges – 2 blood oranges – 4 clementines – 1 lemon – 2 ruby grapefruits – 1/2 pomegranate – Salt (we use Maldon) and freshly ground black pepper – 1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves – 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves

citrus recipes

Instructions

  • Smash olives with side of knife and remove pits.
  • In a medium bowl, combine olives, bomba, and half the olive oil. Stir well and set aside to marinate.
  • Slice the top and bottom off navel oranges and blood oranges. Remove the peel and white pith carefully with knife. Slice across cross-sections and set aside.
  • Peel clementines, individually segment slices, and set aside.
  • Slice the top and bottom off lemon and grapefruit. Remove peel and all white pith carefully. Slice each segment from membrane and set aside.
  • Slice pomegranate in half. Over a bowl of cold water, hit pomegranate with the back of a spoon so each individual seed falls into the water. Remove any white particles. Strain seeds and set aside.
  • On a large, flat serving plate, randomly arrange all citrus fruits and segments, and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds. Spoon olives over fruit and drizzle with remaining olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and top with parsley and mint.
  • Serve immediately.

(Source: http://canadaam.ctvnews.ca)

Is gourmet food worth the extra dollar?

By Holly Dove

Our taste team finds some nice surprises in a gourmet versus budget food test

When it comes to “party” food, such as salami or olives, many might like to pay the extra few dollars to get added flavour and better quality. But when it comes to the bare essentials, budget food such as milk might taste just as good, if not better, than its gourmet rival. This week the Weekend Herald put gourmet food to the test against budget counterparts as a group of discerning food-lovers – including a Ponsonby chef – took part in a blind tasting. The seven-strong team tried a combination of essential foods and “party” foods – milk, olives, cheese, chips, salami, bananas and peanut butter. Comparing budget, mid-range and high-end foods the tasters sampled food from each category while blindfolded.

Without the packaging and brand-name hype, they were able to judge food based solely on taste – with no distractions.

The winners

Mainland Tasty Cheese, valued at $7.70 for 250g

Mid-range price.

“More crumbly [than the other contestants] and lots of flavour”, according to Herald’s Bite food editor Jo Elwin.

Ponsonby chef Dean agreed with the top spot, grading it a four out of five and describing it as “vintagey”.

Waitrose Halkidiki

olives valued at $8.99 for 300g.

High-end price.

A unanimous winner here, the Waitrose olives were described by tasters as big, juicy and full of flavour. “Succulent and herby”, said Dean, while fellow taster Lizzie Sullivan said they were “delicious and flavourful.”

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Olive bread is perfect for fall

A mix of olives with an undercurrent of rosemary makes a savory loaf that’s a perfect complement to autumn soups and stews.

If extending an olive branch is a symbol of peace, imagine the reaction you’ll get when you extend a loaf of savory olive bread, each slice an attractive mosaic of ingredients. On the other hand, if there’s not enough to go around, war may break out. Worth the risk.

ows_141339677056209As with any recipe defined by a main ingredient — in this case, olives — it’s best to seek out good quality olives. Bypass the jars and cans and peruse the olive bars found in many grocery stores, which also lets you buy only the amount you need. While Kalamata are the most common black olives in olive breads, some may prefer the smaller Niçoise with their concentration of flavor. There are a broad range of green olives, from quite fruity to deeply briny. Avoid any stuffed varieties, though; the fillings will create wet pockets in the bread and compete with the olives’ flavor. This recipe uses a mix of purple-black Kalamatas and plump, green Sicilians. Experiment! Some will ows_141339672622626favor an all-Kalamata loaf, while others go only green. The dough also incorporates some olive oil into the mix. In this case, a basic olive oil suffices because the bread bakes at a high temperature; save your spendier oil for fresh vinaigrette. This recipe also uses a kneading technique that’s becoming more popular, a bonus with this soft dough. Instead of massaging and pummeling the dough on a counter and being tempted to add more flour, place the dough in an oiled bowl, then with wet hands use a stretch-and-fold action, pulling one end up and over, repeating on all four “sides” of the bowl. Do this three times in 15-minute intervals and you’ll feel the dough start to develop its body, becoming smoother and more easily handled. It’s actually pretty cool. (And if that sounds time-consuming, it’s little different from baking several pans of cookies.) Set the dough aside to rise for about an hour, shape and let rise for another 30 to 40 minutes, then bake. Sharing such a loaf with people you love is the very definition of “breaking bread,” which is one of the most peaceable things we can do.

(Source: http://www.startribune.com)

Olive Tapenade and Mushroom Bruschetta

Olive-Tapenade-and-Mushroom

…The Chili Cheese Toast, which was recommended to us, was strictly okay: the green olives and green bell pepper did add to the flavour. But the Olive Tapenade and Mushroom Bruschetta is a delight. Loaded on the bruschetta, moist and bursting with flavours, it was devoured.

(Source: http://www.mid-day.com)

Health benefits of olives

September 16, 2014, by Katie Wilhelmi RD, LD , The Journal

I love olives. They are one of my favorite foods. Ironically, my 2-year-old also loves them. My husband claims it’s because I ate way more than my share when I was pregnant. Whatever the reason might be, I’m glad he likes them too.

Olives are a main ingredient on any pizzas we make at our house. They are common on holiday tables and at parties on traditional relish trays. But olives are also an ideal ingredient to add flavor and variety to foods all year long.

Olives come in many different shapes, colors, sizes and flavors. The difference between black and green olives is simply the ripeness. Green olives are unripe and black olives are fully ripe. Olives, both ripe and unripe, are cured or pickled before eating. The reason for this is that fresh olives are too bitter to eat because they contain oleuropein. Oleuropein is full of antioxidants that actually make the olives good for us.

Olive-varieties

Even though olives have a high fat content – 15 to 30 percent – the majority of fat is heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. Olives are also considered a good source of vitamin E and contain the natural antioxidants found in oleuropein. Four or five medium to large ripe olives have only 25 calories and 2 grams of fat. Because of the curing process, olives do contain sodium. Rinsing olives first before eating will help reduce some of the sodium.

If you are looking for new ways to try serving olives one way is to make a tapenade. Tapenades are an olive puree or paste blended with seasonings and herbs. All you need is a food processor, blender or knife with a cutting board to prepare a basic tapenade. Tapenades are the perfect building blocks to use with baguettes, crackers or pita chips for holiday parties. For another fun appetizer idea using olives try the stuffed olive recipe below.

Gouda-Stuffed Olives (Serves 24).

All you need

1 oz Gouda cheese | 1 (6-oz) can large black ripe pitted olives, drained | 3 oz thinly sliced prosciutto or deli ham

All you do

1. Cut Gouda cheese into small (1/4-inch) pieces; stuff one piece into each olive.

2. Cut prosciutto into 3-by–inch strips; fold each strip lengthwise once to form 3-by–inch strips.

3. Wrap a strip of prosciutto around each olive; secure with a toothpick.

4. Cover and chill up to 24 hours before serving.

Nutrition per serving: Calories 20, Total fat 1.5 g, Sodium 150 mg, Total carbohydrate 0 g

This information is not intended as medical advice. Please consult a medical professional for individual advice.

Katie Wilhelmi is a registered dietitian at the New Ulm Hy-Vee.

(Source: http://www.nujournal.com)

(Like: https://www.facebook.com/inolivia.gr)

Parmezan Chicken with minted Zucchini

SERVES: 4,  PREP: 20 mins, COOK: 15 mins, SKILLS: Basic

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INGREDIENTS

– 1/4 cup plain flour, – 1/2 cup plain Greek-style yoghurt, – 1 cup panko breadcrumbs, – 1/2 cup finely grated parmesan, – 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, – 4 x 125g uncrumbed chicken schnitzels, – 1/4 cup olive oil, – 4 zucchini, cut into ribbons, – 400g can cannellini beans, drained, rinsed, – 1/2 cup marinated pitted green olives, halved lengthways, – 2 tablespoons small fresh mint leaves, torn, – 60g baby rocket leaves, – 2 tomatoes, seeded, finely chopped

METHOD

1. Place flour on a plate. Season with salt and pepper. Place yoghurt in a shallow bowl. Combine breadcrumbs, parmesan and parsley on a plate.

2. Coat 1 piece of chicken in flour, shaking off excess. Dip in yoghurt. Coat in breadcrumb mixture. Place on a large plate. Repeat with remaining chicken, flour, yoghurt and breadcrumb mixture.

3. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook chicken for 4 to 5 minutes each side or until golden and cooked through. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towel.

4. Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook zucchini for 2 to 3 minutes or until just softened. Remove from heat. Add beans, olives, mint and rocket. Season with salt and pepper. Toss gently to combine. Serve chicken with zucchini mixture and sprinkle with tomato.

*Recipe by Liz Macri.

(Source: http://www.heraldsun.com.au)

Olives and oranges

Olive and orange have a lot in common. The O — obviously. The spherical shape — sorta. And the intensity of flavor. Olive hits the low notes on the palate; orange the high.

Together, they strike a rich chord. One I found refreshingly fresh. Proving me late to the party. Olive and orange have been palling around the Mediterranean for a long time. The team adds complexity to stews, sharpness to salads and intrigue to metaphor.

Olive, with its connection to the olive branch, is a natural stand-in for peace. Orange, with its sunny disposition, doubles for optimism. Together the salty-and-sweet, little-and-big, rich-and-acidic odd couple both taste good and do good. Definitely refreshing.

Orange Olives

1008_OLIVE_ORANGE_TB2 cups brine-cured olives

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves

1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

1/2 teaspoon white-wine vinegar

Drain olives and tumble into a bowl. Pour in warm water to cover. Soak 15 minutes. Drain. Pat dry.

Roll olives into a medium skillet along with oil, thyme, zest, garlic and fennel seeds. Cook over medium-high heat until garlic turns fragrant, about 4 minutes. Pull pan off heat; stir in vinegar. Pack into a 1-pint jar (I’m crazy about those Weck canning jars). Serve warm or cold.

Adapted from Bon Appetit.

(Source: http://www.providencejournal.com)