Tipp: So erkennen Sie gefärbte schwarze Oliven

Eisensalze statt Sonnenreife

Schwarze Oliven gelten als reif, aromatisch und mild. Aber Vorsicht: In den meisten Fällen ist die Farbe künstlich. Hier erfahren Sie, wie Sie zuverlässig eingefärbte schwarze Oliven erkennen.

schwarze_oliven-cab0b5676347ee05

Schwarze Oliven gelten als kulinarische Verkörperung der typischen, mediterranen Ruhe. Denn Oliven bekommen die dunkle Farbe nur, wenn Sie in den warmen Sonnenstrahlen langsam reifen. Erst sind die Steinfrüchte grün, später violett und schließlich, wenn sie vollkommen sonnenverwöhnt sind, schwarz. Denn tatsächlich ist die Farbe der Oliven nur der Indikator des Reifegrades, die Sorte der Pflanze spielt hierbei keine Rolle. Jede schwarze Olive war einst grün – und mit genügend Zeit verdunkelt sich auch jede grüne Olive am Baum. Ein langsames, unhektisches und entspanntes Reifen, das Sie schmecken: Sind die grünen Oliven noch intensiv, leicht bitter und manchmal etwas scharf, schmecken ihre dunkleren Pendants deutlich milder und komplexer. Gleichzeitig haben schwarze Oliven eine zartere Konsistenz. Kein Wunder also, dass schwarze Oliven als qualitativ hochwertiger gelten.

(Source: http://www.ekitchen.de)

Lesvos to Present the Best of Greek Food

In Agia Paraskevi, the local Museum of Industrial Olive Oil Production will be hosting the olive oil cooking event, combining tradition and modern cooking trends. Olive oil, whole olives and olive paste will have a central role in the recipes, while the dishes will be presented in traditional clay utensils. The event will be accompanied by speeches regarding the pottery art of Lesvos.

athinorama-e1520325125849

 

(Source: http://greece.greekreporter.com)

Deviled Eggs with Olives and Rosemary

Upgrade classic deviled eggs with olives, which also give the dish a health boost: they’re loaded with vitamin E  and you get a lot of good, healthy fats and great flavor. 

seamus-muller-deviled-eggs-today-180301-tease-01_62314cc7ee29ddcc5391f52726f57e6d.today-inline-large

Ingredients

12 large eggs | 3 tablespoons crème fraîche, plus more if needed | 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard | 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper | 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil | Juice of 1⁄2 lemon | 1/4 cup fresh rosemary leaves | Coarse sea salt to taste | Chopped Halkidiki olives (pitted) to taste | Paprika to taste

Preparation

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fill a large bowl with ice and water.
2. Add the eggs and cook for 8 minutes. Drain the eggs and transfer to the ice water. When cool, peel and cut each egg in half lengthwise. Transfer the yolks to the bowl of a food processor; refrigerate the whites.
3. Add the crème fraîche, mustard, cayenne, olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary, and a pinch of salt to the food processor. Process until smooth, scraping the bowl occasionally. The mixture should be soft enough to pipe through a piping bag, but not too loose. If it’s stiff, pulse in another tablespoon of crème fraîche.
4. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag or resealable plastic bag with a hole snipped in one corner.
5. Arrange the egg whites cut-side up in a single layer on a serving platter. Pipe the yolk mixture into the egg white cavities.
6. Top each with chopped Halkidiki olives.
7. Sprinkle with paprika and serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Greek Feta & Olive Spread

This appetizer includes all the classic Greek ingredients, and comes together quickly.

SpicyFetaDipBoardCloseINGREDIENTS

  • 1 package (6 ounce) feta cheese, crumbled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 2 ounces sun-dried tomatoes, softened
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon black olives, drained and chopped
  • In a food processor, place the feta cheese, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, sun-dried tomatoes and oregano. Using the pulse setting, blend the mixture until smooth. Transfer to a medium bowl.
  • Blend in the olives by hand or with a spoon.
  • Refrigerate until serving.

(Source: https://www.epicurious.com)

“Have an Olive Day” Launches with EU Support

Have an Olive day

The European Union has teamed up with Spanish Inter-Professional Table Olive Organization, INTERACEITUNA, and Michelin-starred chef José Andrés to launch an olives campaign directed at U.S. consumers. The goal of the campaign—“A tasty message from Europe. Have an Olive Day”—is to raise awareness of the versatility, flavor, nutrition, and rich history of olive production in Europe, especially in Spain, the world leader in production and exports of table olives.

The campaign will run through 2019 and will seek to educate U.S. consumers on the different variations of European olives and their culinary uses. It will focus on U.S. regions with high olive consumption, including New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia.

(Source: https://www.specialtyfood.com)

Olive production down 30%

Production of olives for olive oil in Portugal is expected to have fallen by 30 percent in 2016 to less than 500,000 tonnes, and the autumn/winter grain growing area to have fallen to an “all-time low” according to projections from the National Statistics Institute.

page20_OLIVEIRAS

According to INE, the drop in olive production for oil was the result of “adverse weather and the annual production rotation of traditional olive groves,” and expects total production of about 491,000 tonnes
(-30 percent against 2015), but “good quality” olive oil.
As for autumn/winter grains there was a “general reduction of installed areas,” compared to the previous year due to periods of intense cold and a lack of rain.
INE’s projections point to drops of around 5 percent in rye area, 10 percent in common wheat, triticale and barley and of 15 percent for durum wheat, with a total grain area of around 130,000 hectares, “which is the lowest recorded in the last three decades, in a year in which weather conditions made it possible for planting to go ahead as normal.”

(Source: http://theportugalnews.com)

Chilli Salmon Delight

str2_amy0210_jg_2-770x4702 servings

2x160g salmon fillet; salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste; a dash of cayenne pepper; olive oil for drizzling; 2 cloves garlic, crushed; some shredded purple cabbage; 1 mini yellow capsicum, halved and sliced; fresh salad leaves like curly endives, etc.

Balsamic dressing
3 tbsp balsamic vinegar; 1 tbsp honey; salt to taste; 1 tbsp olive oil; 1 tsp capers, chopped; 3 green olives, sliced

For the dressing

In a small mixing bowl, combine the balsamic vinegar, honey and salt. Stir to dissolve the salt before drizzling in the olive oil; whisk with a fork or small wire whisk until emulsified. Toss in the capers and green olives. Set aside.

To cook

Preheat a grill pan over medium high heat. Sprinkle salmon with salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper. Drizzle with olive oil and cook for 2-3 minutes each side, or until cooked to your liking. Remove from grill. Add the garlic cloves and grill according to your taste. Remove garlic.

To assemble

Divide the cabbage, capsicum and salad leaves between two serving plates. Place a slice of salmon and a garlic clove on each plate and drizzle the balsamic dressing over the salad. Serve.

(Source: http://www.star2.com)

Black olive and lemon paté

A fabulous quartet of flavours – the richness of the cream cheese is cut through with the acidity of lemon and the earthy tang of olives.

e6f707da-71b5-420b-a4df-7b3c9dc3dd68-2060x1568

Serves 4
100g olives, pitted
250g cream cheese
Juice of 1 lemon
Black pepper

1 Add the pitted olives to a blender and blend until almost smooth.

2 Transfer the olive mix to a fine sieve and sit it over a bowl to drain any excess liquid – around 5 minutes should do it. However, if your olives were in liquid it might take a little longer.

3 Next, add the cream cheese to a mixing bowl with the olives, lemon juice and black pepper. Carefully fold together until incorporated.

4 Place a round pastry cutter in the centre of a serving plate, add the paté and tamp down. Remove the ring and serve with some dressed leaves and hot toast.
Andrew Dargue, vanillablack.co.uk

(Source: https://www.theguardian.com)

Grilled Whole Mackerel With Lemon, Oregano, and Olives

Grilling a whole fish sounds daunting, but it’s incredibly simple and requires almost no preparation before cooking it.

This recipe is courtesy of Epicurious.

Grilled Mackerel Flickr MainDirections

Whisk together lemon zest, juice, salt, and pepper. Pour in the olive oil in a stream, whisking until combined well. Whisk in olives and chopped oregano.

With a sharp paring knife, make 1-inch long slits at 2-inch intervals down the middle of the fish, on both sides. Brush the fish all over with vegetable oil, and season with salt and pepper. Season fish cavity with salt and pepper, and fill the cavity with 3 lemon slices and 3 oregano sprigs. Arrange remaining lemon slices and oregano sprigs on top of fish and tie fish closed with kitchen string.

Preheat grill to medium-high heat for cooking. If using a charcoal grill, open the vents on the bottom of the grill before lighting the charcoal.

Grill fish on lightly oiled grill rack, covered only if using gas grill, for 15 minutes. Turn fish over using a metal spatula and tongs, and grill for 15 more minutes, until just cooked through.

Transfer fish to a large serving platter, remove kitchen string, and pour lemon-olive sauce over the top before serving.

(Source: http://www.thedailymeal.com)

한국에서 Inolivia

Southe Korea이제 우리 Inolivia 홈페이지가 한국어로도 안내가 되어 있음을 알려 드립니다. 그래서 한국분들도 이제 한국어로 올리브에 대해서 배우고 우리의 제품을 음미하실 수가 있습니다.

우리 홈페이지 www.inolivia.com  당신을 초대합니다.

Inolivia 마케팅