US-Handelsministerium nimmt sich spanische Oliven vor

Zwei US-Produzenten behaupten in einer Klage, dass spanische Oliven um bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden. Das US-Handelsministerium will den “unfairen Handel” stoppen.

oliven_1500025337079693Nach Holz aus Kanada und Zucker aus Mexiko nimmt die US-Regierung jetzt spanische Oliven ins Visier. Das Handelsministerium in Washington teilte am Donnerstag mit, es habe eine Untersuchung gestartet, ob Olivenimporte aus Spanien “unfair subventioniert” sind. Das Ministerium gehe damit einer Klage von zwei US-Olivenproduzenten nach.

Sie behaupten, dass spanische Oliven in den USA bis zu 200 Prozent unter Marktwert verkauft werden.

Handelsminister Wilbur Ross erklärte, die Regierung werde “rasch handeln, um jeglichen unfairen Handel zu stoppen”. Bis zum 7. August will das Ministerium entscheiden, ob Unternehmen und Beschäftigte in den USA tatsächlich geschädigt werden. Ab September könnte die Regierung vorläufige Strafzölle gegen spanische Oliven verhängen, im November dann endgültige.

Oliven-Exporte in Höhe von 71 Millionen Dollar

Spanien exportierte im vergangenen Jahr Oliven im Wert von knapp 71 Millionen Dollar (62 Mio. Euro) in die USA, wie das Ministerium mitteilte. Es handelte sich um “alle Farben, alle Formen, alle Größen” von reifen, verpackten Oliven. “Spezial-Oliven” etwa für den Martini gehören nicht dazu, auch mit Knoblauch oder Käse gefüllte Oliven nicht.

Die USA streiten sich bereits mit Kanada um den Import von Nadelbaumhölzern und den Export von US-Milchprodukten dorthin. Der Zuckerstreit mit Mexiko ist mittlerweile beigelegt – der Preis für Zucker aus Mexiko, der in die USA geliefert wird, wurde leicht angehoben.

US-Präsident Donald Trump hat auch in der Handelspolitik die Parole “Amerika zuerst” ausgegeben. Die Regierung will mehrere Freihandelsabkommen neu verhandeln. Multilaterale Abkommen mit vielen Mitgliedsländern sieht sie kritisch.

(Source: http://diepresse.com)

Everything you wanted to know about olives

– The olive tree, Oleaeuropaea, is native to countries in Asia and Africa and along the Mediterranean Sea.
– Unripe olives are green in color and as they ripen they turn black or dark purple.
– Olives are a fruit, not vegetables as many people believe.
– Olive oil contains no cholesterol, salt or carbohydrate.
– Olives are rich in vitamin E and healthy fats.
– An olive tree can live up to 600 years.
– It can take up to 10 years for an olive tree to bear fruit.
– Globally, people consume approximately 2.25 million tonnes of olive oil each year.
– Spain, Italy and Greece are the top olive producing nations in the world.
– Since 1990, consumption of olive oil in the United States has increased significantly. In the last two decades, its consumption has increased from 30 million gallons to nearly 70 million gallons a year.
– 2,550 olive branches were used at the 2004 Olympics Games when the tradition of crowning Olympians with an olive wreath was reintroduced.

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Hear what our expert has to say

“Olives, whether eaten whole or as olive oil, offer exceptional health properties. Olives contain an abundance of antioxidants, protective disease fighting compounds found in plants. Few other foods with high fat content offer such a wide range of antioxidant nutrients. All these elements combine to reduce excessive inflammation and keep the body healthy. They also work to neutralise the damaging effects of free radicals on the body’s cells, which can contribute to disease and ill health. Despite being high in fat, olive oil is a better choice compared to other oils for your heart. The majority of fat found in olives is monounsaturated fatty acid and oleic acid, both healthy forms of fat. These elements suppress the production of unhealthy cholesterol which has been shown to play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Even though monounsaturated fat is good for your heart, it is still high in calories. So it should be consumed only in moderate amounts if you are concerned about weight gain and excess calorie intake.

Care must be taken when using olive oil for frying. Shallow frying is safe; but with deep frying and intense heating the olive oil is heated beyond its smoke point and starts to break down chemically. This results in the oil losing most of its antioxidants, releasing toxic chemicals in the form of smoke and producing free radicals (atoms that damage healthy cell).”

Contributed by Aisha Pookunju, Dietitian at Hamad Medical Corporation

(Source: http://thepeninsulaqatar.com)

Spanish Scientists Awarded for Research on Olive Cultivation

By IVÁN L. GIMENO on October 30, 2014
Filed in European Union

The results of the second Scientific Research in Olives and Olive Oil Awards, sponsored by the Caja Rural of Jaén Foundation, were announced during a conference in the Andalusian capital today. The Spanish scientific researchers Mercedes Campos and Mario Porcel were awarded the €5,000 prize.

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Geolit, the technological and scientific park of Jaén located in Mengíbar, was the venue of this event, whose jury decided to elect the research “Bioecological Study of the Chrysopidae Family in Olive Orchards: a Population Growth and Conservation Perspective,” written by both scientists as the winning choice.

The second prize was granted to the work of three young Spanish scientists, Javier Sanz, Manuel David García and Manuel Barneo for their study “Jaén´s Mountain Oliva Oil: Quality and Value Chain,” awarded with €2,000. Finally, the jury also decided to give a special mention to the research “Prospective, Study and Evaluation of the Mosses as Vegetal Cover in Jaén´s Oliva Oil Fields,” written by the team composed by Susana Rams, Milagros Saavedra and Cristina Alcántara.

This is the second edition of the awards, which are recognized in the Spanish olive oil industry. It is promoted by Caja Rural of Jaén Foundation to recognize studies by researchers who are contributing to advances in scientific knowledge related to the olive. It includes aspects such as how the elaboration process of the olive oil contributes to the social, economic and environmental improvement of the country

Aspects like the quality and the adaptation of the methodology in the research to obtain valid results, and their relevance to people and their usefulness were key to select the winners. The jury was presided by Manuel Parras (rector of the Jaén University) and included Francisco Molina (secretary of the Caja Rural of Jaén Foundation), Mercedes Fernández (head of the technical and chemistry & standardization units of the International Olive Council), Gabriel Beltrán (in charge of the research department at IFAPA) and Carlos Piniña (representative of the Andalusian Agricultural Engineers College).

A conference with the title “Jaén´s Olive Oil and Sovena Group: Leading the Present and Building The Future,” was also conducted at the event by Luis Folqué.

(Source: http://www.oliveoiltimes.com)